Conferences/Seminars/Lectures

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2022 LIDS Student Conference
Jan/26 Wed 08:45AM–05:30PM
Jan/27 Thu 09:00AM–05:30PM

The annual LIDS Student Conference is a student-organized, student-run conference that provides an opportunity for graduate students and postdocs to present their research to peers as well as to the community at large. This year, we are delighted to welcome four distinguished plenary speakers and accompanying student sessions in Machine Learning and Statistics; Information and Networks; Control Theory and Applications; Algorithms, Optimization, and Game Theory.

This year's plenary speakers are:

  • Yuejie Chi
    Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University

  • Na Li
    Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Mathematics
    School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)
    Harvard University

  • Angelia Nedich
    Professor in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering
    Arizona State University

  • Adam Wierman
    Professor in the Department of Computing and Mathematical Sciences (CMS)
    California Institute of Technology

For more information, including the full schedule of events, visit: https://lidsconf.mit.edu/2022/

**NOTE: This year's conference will be virtual. Registration is requested.**

A Taste of Programming with SICP JS
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–12:00PM

With visiting professor Martin Henz. We can understand some computer programs in the way we solve math equations: by performing one simple algebraic step after another, until we reach an answer. This Independent Activity introduces programming in this way, inspired by the first chapter of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, JavaScript edition (SICP JS). We start from first principles, by looking at functions that you know from mathematics, but before long, you will program interesting graphics and sound patterns using the Source Academy, a website built for SICP JS. The Activity offers entertaining and thought-provoking insights into the essence of computation, and at the same time an introduction to programming using the popular programming language JavaScript.

Syllabus:

Day 1: The elements: See the basic ingredients of all computer programs
Day 2: A picture language: Program graphical patterns by wishful thinking
Day 3: Functions: Experience the magic of higher-order programming
Day 4: A curve language: Program fractals and three-dimensional curves with functions
Day 5: The lambda calculus: Explore the essence of computation
Day 6: Functional sound processing: Make some noise

For more details and to register see https://www.eecs.mit.edu/academics/iap-offerings/iap-2022/.

AI Challenges
Jan/05 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM

This will be a project-based IAP course that aims to develop new AI for a series of problems. Students will work closely with MIT faculty/staff in small teams and will be provided with data, project ideas, and computing resources. There will be numerous opportunities for successful and interested students to continue their research with ongoing research projects after the IAP course through UROPs, theses projects, etc.

email vijayg@ll.mit.edu if you are interested in attending this course.

AI challenges such as ImageNet, CIFAR, Graph Challenge, Moments in Time have resulted in major advances in image recognition, graph processing, and video action recognition. These and many other challenge problems are characterized by: 1) open datasets, 2) clear problem statements and 3) baseline implementations. Inspired by these challenges, through the USAF-MIT AI Accelerator, we are developing challenge problems to bring AI innovations to domains such as:

1) Datacenter Monitoring: Develop AI that can detect failures and workload characteristics in an operational datacenter
2) Reinforcement Learning Applications: Develop AI for aerial vehicles for games and novel environments
3) Magnetic Navigation: Develop AI for aerial vehicles for navigation in GPS denied environments by leveraging novel ML techniques alongside physical modelling.
4) Flight Maneuvers: Develop AI to detect good and bad flight paths from a flight simulator.

This will be a project-based IAP course and our team will provide significant guidance to students in developing AI capabilities for the above domains. Students will work closely with MIT faculty/staff in small teams and will be provided with data, project ideas, and computing resources. There will be numerous opportunities for successful and interested students to continue their research with ongoing research projects after the IAP course through UROPs, theses projects, etc.

 

AI and Our Human Future
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–02:00PM

From health care, to transportation, to social media, the rapid adoption of artificial intelligence across many fields has transformed the economic and social structures of people’s daily lives. In doing so, AI not only has impacted our society in unforeseen ways, but is altering how we experience reality.

In this fireside chat, Daniel Huttenlocher and Eric Schmidt will sit down with moderator Asu Ozdaglar for a discussion on how AI is changing our relationship with knowledge and society and what this technology means for us all.

Speakers

  • Daniel Huttenlocher, Dean, MIT Schwarzman College of Computing
  • Eric Schmidt, Co-founder of Schmidt Futures and former CEO & Chairman of Google
  • Asu Ozdaglar, Deputy Dean of Academics for MIT Schwarzman College of Computing and Head of MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (moderator)

This event will be live streamed. Registrants will receive a confirmation email with access instructions prior to the event.

AI and Our Human Future: IAP Discussion Seminars with Dean Dan Huttenlocher and Eric Schmidt
Jan/25 Tue 01:30PM–03:00PM

EVENT LIMITED TO MIT STUDENTS.  Daniel Huttenlocher, Dean of the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing, and Eric Schmidt, Co-founder of Schmidt Futures and former CEO and Chairman of Google/Alphabet, will be holding discussion seminars with small groups of undergraduate and graduate students.

Following a fireside chat on January 24, these seminars aim to explore in more depth how the on-going development and adoption of AI not only has impacted our society but even how we experience reality.  (The podcast Hidden Forces provides an overview of Huttenlocher and Schmidt’s perspective on this topic.)

Students: To be eligible for participation in these discussion sessions, you must register your interest by Friday, January 14, by sending the following to our_ai_future@mit.edu:

  • your name
  • your department/program and what degree you are pursuing
  • a one-page essay on your thoughts on the discussion and/or issues you would be interested in exploring

Selected participants will be notified by Tuesday, January 18.

AI in Finance - NLP, Graphs & Personalization
Jan/19 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

MIT - Capital One Tech Talk
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://mit.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJArdu6sqT4jGd21CF4Emoytg1ocGfy7B9zc

Speakers: Abhijit Bose, Aamer Charania & Giri Iyengar

Abstract:
Join us to hear how AI is transforming the financial services industry with firsthand views from Capital One.

A few years ago, Abhijit Bose was leading Facebook’s East Coast AI Research, leading computer vision models to spot sunglasses on people’s faces. Now he is heading Capital One Machine Learning! Hear what attracted him to Capital One and how he envisions AI transforming the financial services industry. Abhijit will be joined by two MIT alumni - Aamer Charania and Giri Iyenga. Aamer, who leads development of machine learning services at Capital One, will talk about NLP/Conversational AI and Graphs. Giri, who leads enterprise marketing technology, will share his views on Personalization at scale.

The talk will be beneficial for folks interested in AI applications for finance in general, or like to hear about NLP/Conversational AI, Graphs or Personalization at scale.

Speaker Bios:

Abhijit Bose (https://www.linkedin.com/in/abose/)

Abhijit Bose is the Managing Vice President for Capital One’s Center for Machine Learning (C4ML). Prior to joining Capital One, Abhijit served as Facebook’s Head of Engineering (Montreal, NYC, Pittsburg) for Facebook AI Research.

With over 20+ years of data science expertise, Abhijit encompasses an impressive technical and academic career history. He obtained a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering, received his dual-Masters in Mechanical Engineering as well as Computer Science, and received his dual-Ph.D in Computer Science and Engineering Mechanics.

Before joining Facebook, Abhihit was the Managing Director of Data Science for JP Morgan's Digital Organization. He’s also worked for IBM, Google, and American Express. Abhijit and his wife live in New Jersey with their 6-year-old twins. When he’s not working, Abhijit
enjoys spending time volunteering with his family at their local animal shelter, as well as hiking and touring state parks.

Aamer Charania (https://www.linkedin.com/in/aamercharania/)

Aamer Charania leads the development of enterprise Machine Learning products and services at Capital One. Before joining Capital One, he led AI initiatives at Humana and Verizon. Prior to that, he was a research assistant at MIT.

Aamer enjoys giving back to the community. He is the founder of Dallas AI (http://www.dallas-ai.org/), the largest nonprofit AI meetup group in North Texas, with over 3,700 members. Aamer is also a board member of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Big Data Advisory. In addition, he is an MIT Alumni Career Advisor, MIT Educational Counselor and former President of the MIT Alumni Club of Dallas & Fort Worth.

Aamer has been awarded over 10 patents. He holds a Masters in Engineering from MIT, a Masters in Computer Science from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and an MBA from Southern Methodist University.

Giri Iyengar (https://www.linkedin.com/in/giyengar/)

Giri Iyengar leads the Enterprise Marketing Tech teams as part of Enterprise Products and Platforms Technology Organization. He is responsible for the Capital One Site, Messaging, Content Management, and Experimentation Technology Platforms at Capital One.

Prior to Capital One, Giri was the head of Engineering for eBay's Advertising group where he led research and development of several innovative ML driven advertising products for eBay's buyers and sellers. He also created the first ever Computer Vision team at eBay that allows billions of products to be searched using your smartphone pictures. After his PhD from MIT, he started his career as a Machine Learning Researcher at IBM Watson Research Center where he worked on Speech Recognition, Computer Vision and other Machine Learning technologies.

Activating a National Ecosystem for Manufacturing Advanced Functional Fibers and Fabrics
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–02:00PM

Recent breakthroughs in fiber and textile materials and manufacturing processes is enabling the transformation of traditional fibers, yarns and fabrics into highly sophisticated, integrated, and networked systems. Advanced Functional Fabrics of America (AFFOA), one of the 9 Department of Defense-sponsored Manufacturing USA Institutes, sits at the nexus of innovation of traditionally disparate fields – that of textiles and micro-electronics - facilitating transition of innovation across the manufacturing “valley of death” and bringing the commercialization of advanced functional fabric systems closer to reality. This presentation will include an overview of AFFOA’s advanced fabrics ecosystem, and specific examples on how the Institute facilitates the manufacturing evolution of selected functional fabric systems will be provided. Situated a short what from MIT Campus and founded by MIT innovators, AFFOA is excited about partnering with MIT faculty, staff, and students to transition their ideas from the lab into high-impact, commercial reality.

 

Register Now
MIT Kerb Required

Adventures in Scanning Electron Microscopy
Jan/24 Mon 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 09:00AM–05:00PM

Adventures in Scanning Electron Microscopy is an activity offered by Donald Galler. The activity offers training and introduction to electron microscopy. No prerequisities. Advanced signup required; signup deadline January 2, 2022. Signup link.

American Perceptions of Climate Change (IAP Workshop)
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

Over 50% of Americans are worried about climate change – but why is the rest of the country not? Do they just not get it? Are they duped by misinformation and corporate propaganda? What role does the media play? And how do we get more Americans to support taking action on climate change?

Join this workshop on public perceptions, engagement, and communications in America today.


Reviewing American Perceptions on Climate Change
Thurs. Jan 27, 1:00 - 2:30 PM, Virtual

Led by Laur Hesse Fisher, Program Director, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative

The first session will review academic literature and real-world projects on understanding and engaging with Americans across the political spectrum on the topic of climate change. Weaving presentation and discussion, it will draw upon learnings from the fields of political science, psychology, sociology, and communications to unpack how – and why – Americans think the way they do about climate change, what more we need to know, and what more we need to do. The session will also review:

  • How Americans’ understanding of climate change it is (and is not) evolving
  • Deniers, skeptics, alarmists – is there room for nuance?
  • Republicans and climate change: policy, politics & activism
  • Climate journalism in today’s media environment
  • High school climate change education in the U.S.
  • Lab- and field-tested strategies for climate change engagement and communications

 

**Please note that the second day of this workshop has been cancelled. The first day will run as planned.** 

Arcadia Science: A New Institutional Model for the Research and Translation of Biological Discovery
Jan/20 Thu 12:00PM–01:30PM

Dr. Prachee Avasthi, PhD, Arcadia Science, Co-founder, Chief Scientific Officer, and Director of Cell Biology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Arcadia Science is a new for-profit research institute distinct from traditional academic and biotech environments. Their mission is to uncover novel biology of non-model organisms and to directly commercialize impactful discoveries. Composed of scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs, Arcadia Science is creating a unique environment to empower curiosity-driven discoveries that are also financially self-sustaining. Join us for this moderated Q&A with their Co-Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Prachee Avasthi, to learn more about Arcadia Science.

Session organizers: Chris Giuliano and Alex Chan

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/96281958467

Password: MITBiology

Aren't We Better Off Without Christianity?
Jan/20 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

40 years ago, sociologists believed that as the world became more modern, more educated, and more scientific, religious belief would naturally decline. Many western intellectuals thought this was both inevitable and desirable: religion would not survive in the modern world, and we modern people would be better off without it. Doesn't Christianity hinder our pursuits of modern values? What is our reality today? Is Christianity positive or negative for individuals and society? And what shapes how we determine what makes us “better off”?

Dr. REBECCA McLAUGHLIN, Ph.D. in English literature from Cambridge University, Theology degree from Oak Hill College in London. Speaker, Writer, and author of Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion. Find out more about Rebecca at www.rebeccamclaughlin.org.

Author Rights Workshop
Jan/20 Thu 03:00PM–04:30PM

When you publish in scholarly journals, you’re usually required to give up some rights in your work. In this seminar, MIT librarians Katharine Dunn and Katie Zimmerman will show you what to look for in author contracts and discuss ways to retain rights to share and reuse your work, including via MIT's open access policies.

 

Katharine Dunn is a scholarly communications librarian at MIT, helping researchers and students make their work more openly available.
Katie Zimmerman is the Director of Copyright Strategy for the MIT Libraries, helping the libraries and the MIT community make informed copyright decisions.

Basics of Copyrights, Data, and Software
Jan/14 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM

It has been said that content is king. Copyrighted works – whether media, software, or art – are a major portion of the world’s creative, intellectual, and economic output. As such, copyright issues affect musicians, artists, authors, and software programmers alike. 
 
This popular talk offers a fun and interesting look at the protection of your creative works of authorship whether developed in the lab at MIT or elsewhere.
 
Join Daniel Dardani, Technology Licensing Officer and intellectual property expert, for an overview of copyright law and consider its history, practice, and relevance to your world and to the MIT community.  Daniel will explore topics including: the nature of originality, fair use, open source, how copyrights can be licensed in the digital age, and others.

Basics of Fair Use
Jan/07 Fri 03:00PM–04:30PM

New things are built on what came before.  If your work uses copyrighted material, you should know about fair use.  What are your rights with regard to prior works?  What requires permission and what doesn’t?  This session will cover the basics of fair use for copyrighted works, so that you know your rights whether you are text mining the scientific literature, adapting a song, or sharing an image you found online. 

Basics of Obtaining a Patent
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:30PM

The issuance of a patent is often seen as an inventor's most notable achievement, but do you know what it takes to apply for and be issued a patent? This session will review the criteria required and the process by which inventions are assessed by the USPTO to determine if creative works are patentable.
 
Jonathan Hromi, Associate Director, IP, Laura Lapsley, Senior IP Paralegal, and Caitlyn Ward, Technology Licensing Associate, all of the MIT Technology Licensing Office (TLO), will discuss the basics of the patent application process, the history and context surrounding patents as a means of protecting commercialization rights, as well as share about the policy and practice of MIT's patenting activities. They'll share insights into how the TLO engages in this process in support of entrepreneurial engagement at MIT.

Beyond the Lab: Journey from Scientist to Founder with E14 Fund
Jan/24 Mon 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 04:00PM–06:00PM

Are you a scientist or engineer curious about starting a deep tech company? Do you want to visit MIT startups in action and learn from founders who have successfully launched ventures out of their labs? Do you want to connect with venture investors dedicated to supporting MIT founders? This course will cover the basics of launching your founder journey and will include trips to Boston-area startups across growth stages. You will join a cohort of future founders with continued opportunities to engage beyond IAP. This course is designed for any student or postdoc thinking about starting a company and we hope to build a diverse cohort of participants across backgrounds and interests. The course is sponsored by E14 Fund, the early stage venture capital firm from and for the MIT startup community.

If you are interested in this course, please complete this form (https://www.e14fund.com/iap) by December 2nd to apply to join the Beyond the Lab cohort for IAP 2022 (January 24th - 28th). This course is designed for any student or postdoc thinking about starting a company and we hope to build a diverse cohort of participants across backgrounds and interests.

If you have any questions or want to be added to the E14 startup community slack channel, please email iap@e14fund.com.

Big Data and Machine Learning in Investing
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

Abstract: We outline how we use Big Data and Machine Learning in our everyday investing process at BlackRock. On the Data side, we strive to incorporate a vast amount of granular information – while making the availability of this information fast and scalable for downstream models. We will give a few examples of what challenges we encounter in our data process and how we address them. On the Machine Learning side, we will discuss what makes the financial domain so special when applying ML, and which situations are more favorable for applying machine learning models. We will also present a few live applications of Machine Learning in investing, including liquidity and trading modelling, managing risk, as well as extracting alpha insights.

 

Participants:

Ganeshapillai Gartheeban, PhD, Director, is a member of the Global Equity Research team within BlackRock's Systematic Active Equity group where he focuses on extracting patterns from large scale heterogeneous datasets.

Prior to joining the firm in October 2014, he was doing in his PhD at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he worked on developing machine learning algorithms for various problems in medicine, systemic risk in financial systems, and sports. Primary motivation of his research is to discover novel approaches to automatically recognize patterns in large datasets and develop tools to answer questions that affect people. His PhD thesis was on learning cross-sectional connections in financial time series, and was supervised by Professor John Guttag and Professor Andrew Lo.

 

Stefano Pasquali, Managing Director, is the Head of Liquidity Research Group at BlackRock Solutions. As Head of Liquidity Research, Mr. Pasquali is responsible for market liquidity modelling both at the security and portfolio level, as well as estimating portfolio liquidity risk profiles. His responsibilities include defining cross asset class models, leveraging available trade data and developing innovative machine learning based approaches to better estimate market liquidity. Mr. Pasquali is heavily involved in developing methodologies to estimate funding liquidity and better estimate funds flows. These models include: the cost of position or portfolio liquidation, time to liquidation, redemption estimation, and investor behavior modelling utilizing a big data approach.

Previous to Blackrock, Mr. Pasquali oversaw research and product development for Bloomberg's liquidity solution, introducing a big data approach to their financial analytics. His team designed and implemented models to estimate liquidity and risk across different asset classes with a particular focus on OTC markets. Before this he led business development and research for fixed income evaluated pricing.

Mr. Pasquali has more than 15 years of experience examining and implementing innovative approaches to calculating risk and market impact. He regularly speaks at industry events about the complexity and challenges of liquidity evaluation? particularly in the OTC marketplace. His approach to risk and liquidity evaluation is strongly influenced by over 20 years of experience working with big data, data mining, machine learning and data base management.

Prior to moving to New York in 2010, Mr. Pasquali held senior positions at several European banks and asset management firms where he oversaw risk management, portfolio risk analysis, model development and risk management committees. These accomplishments include the construction of a risk management process for a global asset management firm with over 100 Billion AUM. This involved driving projects from data acquisition and normalization to model development and portfolio management support.

Mr. Pasquali, a strong believer in academic contribution to the industry, has engaged in various conversations and collaborations with universities from the US, UK, and Italy. He also participates as a supervisor in the Experiential Learning Program and Master of Quantitative Finance Program based at Rutgers University, along with tutoring students in research activities.

Before his career in finance, Mr. Pasquali was a researcher in Theoretical and Computational Physics (in particular Monte Carlo Simulation, Solid State physics, Environment Science, Acoustic Optimization). Originally from Carrara (Tuscany, Italy), he grew up in Parma. Mr. Pasquali is a graduate of Parma University and holds a master’s degree in Theoretical Physics, as well as research fellowships in Computational Physics at Parma University and Reading University (UK).

Stefano lives in New York since 2010. In his spare time, he tries to devote to his passions which are music, traveling and spending more time as possible to the sea and sailing boat.

Alex Remorov, PhD, is a Vice President at BlackRock's Systematic Active Equities (SAE). In this role, Alex builds systematic alpha strategies for hedge funds and long-only portfolios by leveraging machine learning, alternative data, and investment intuition.

Alex earned a BSc in Mathematics and Statistics from the University of Toronto and a PhD in Operations Research from MIT. He has carried out academic research on systematic trading strategies, behavioural biases, and investor decision-making. During this time Alex also did short stints at Manulife Investment Management in Toronto, as well as at Goldman Sachs in New York and London.

BioBots (BioMakers Workshop)
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM

The BioMakers IAP Google Calendar (Check for Updates)

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 1-4 pm starting Jan 6th (+ Friday session 1/14 1-2 PM)

Workshop Contact: Rachel Shen (rs2000@mit.edu), biomakers-exec@mit.edu 

Description:  Biological robots, or biobots, use living cells to sense, process, and respond to their environments. The BioBots workshop is a workshop that meets twice a week during IAP in which students make rings of muscle tissue that are able to generate a force around a soft skeleton. This is a great way to learn more about tissue culture.

 

Biocementing with Microbes (BioMaker Workshop)
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/17 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM

Description: This workshop introduces students to the process of biocementing with microbes. Today, the production of cement for concrete accounts for 8% of global CO2 emissions. Microbially Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) is a promising biocement alternative. The process makes use of microbes to catalyze calcium carbonate crystals that can bind aggregate together.

 

In this workshop, you will learn lab protocols for using the bacteria to biocement aggregate including cultivating the microbe, preparing solutions to induce crystal formation, and biocementing loose sand. We will test different experimental parameters to characterize and optimize the process as well as 3d printing custom designs to make your own fun biocemented sample!

 

More info

 

For more information email lmzalez@mit.edu andcurth@mit.edu

Sign-up Deadline: December 30

 

Book Discussion: The Territories of Science and Religion
Jan/04 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM
Jan/11 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM
Jan/18 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM
Jan/25 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM

Are science and religion inherently opposed?  Have they always been?  Not necessarily, argues distinguished scholar Peter Harrison in The Territories of Science and Religion.  He demonstrates that the concepts of science and religion, as we understand them, are relatively recent, and that the boundaries between them have historically been dynamic and even permeable.  Come join fellow members of the MIT community to read and discuss Harrison’s book and examine how very different approaches to reality have related to and mutually enriched each other, and how they may do so again.

Building the Independent Nation: Morocco’s architectural heritage, 1940-1980
Jan/18 Tue 05:00PM–06:30PM

This lecture will highlight some of the built experiences in Morocco between 1940 and 1980, assessing its significance within the long cultural history of Morocco. It concludes with a discussion of architectural heritage preservation, posing such questions as what are the criteria for determining what should be documented and preserved, and what are the challenges in doing so?

The lecture is intended for all audiences interested in architecture and planning, as well as those interested in learning more about Moroccan architecture and culture. The presentation will be followed by an extended Q&A.

Speaker Biography:
Lahbib El Moumni is an architect and professor at the school of Architecture in Casablanca, Morocco. In 2016 he and fellow architect Imad Dahmani founded Association MAMMA (Mémoire des Architectes Modernes Marocains) to highlight the built heritage of Morocco from the last 15 years of the Protectorate through 1980. The work of MAMMA includes researching and archiving architectural heritage of this period, as well as raising awareness of it through conferences, workshops, exhibitions, and seminars on the architecture, art, and history of Modern Morocco.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/ModernMorocco 

Cancelled -- Gene Regulation and Expression Talk Series: "Single-cell Epigenomics: Gene Regulation at Unprecedented Resolution"
Jan/18 Tue 12:00PM

Dr. Jason Buenrostro, Assistant Professor at Harvard University

Chemical Engineering Chocolate Experiment 
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM
Join ChemE on a chocolate adventure where you can learn all about how chocolate is made and experiment with the properties of chocolate and how it relates to taste and texture. This virtual hands-on experience is open to first years only! 
 
Delicious chocolates will be delivered to you – ChemE flavored! 
Make sure to RSVP to claim your chocolate and your seat: https://forms.gle/2ifxk5ScyL3N5sMs5
Date: Wednesday, January 19th 
Time: 1:00-2:00 PM
virtual event
 
Registration or event questions: Sharece Corner scorner3@mit.edu
Commercialization of MIT Technology
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

Have you ever wondered how technology that’s developed in universities and other academic institutions gets translated into a product to benefit the public? This process is known as technology transfer, and research organizations all over the world utilize teams of tech transfer professionals to evaluate new inventions, protect intellectual property through a patenting process, and license the technology to third parties, such as start-up companies or corporations, for further investment in development and commercialization.

At MIT, the Technology Licensing Office (TLO) supports MIT inventors throughout this process and plays a vital role in the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

You'll hear from Technology Licensing Officers Lauren C. Foster and Deirdre Zammit and learn the strategic approach MIT takes to move innovations from the research bench to the marketplace.

Computational Access and Use of Texts and Data behind Paywalls: Challenges and Resources 
Jan/25 Tue 11:30AM–01:00PM

The rise of applied data science, digital humanities, machine learning, and artificial intelligence has resulted in an increased need for computational access and reuse of research data and publications, many of which are only available behind paywalls and governed by restrictive terms of use. What can you do with proprietary sources, how do you gain access, and how can you make your own research output from such sources shareable are questions that many are asking. Join three experts from the MIT Libraries in this session to learn about the copyright and contractual implications of paywalled data sources and how you can use them and share your results.

MIT Kerberos Required to register. 

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Teaching and Research using the Wolfram Language
Jan/14 Fri 04:00PM–05:00PM

In this session Prof Abbot will present a range of examples to demonstrate why the Wolfram Language is an unparalleled teaching and research tool. Topics to be covered: (1) Using the simple and powerful free-form input functionality; (2) Discussing the consistent syntax and excellent interactive documentation; (3) Examples of high-level numerics, symbolics, visualization, and graphics; (4) Demonstrating the easy access to a wide range of curated data sources and code repositories; (5) Showing how to write papers and theses as Notebooks; and, finally, (6) Setting and assessing open-ended research-style exam questions.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98175785044

Activity Leaders:
Paul Abbott,  Professor of Physics, The University of Western Australia
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Accelerating Chemistry Research and Learning Chemistry with Computational Thinking and Computable Knowledge
Jan/12 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

Designing active-learning modules that function across in-person, hybrid and remote learning spaces remains challenging and nontrivial for chemical educators at all levels. One route to future-proof modules is via interactive electronic notebooks. Example notebooks bridging multiple learning spaces are discussed along with strategies for incorporation across the curriculum.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98501491458

Activity Leaders:
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science
Jason Sonnenberg, Wolfram Research

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Create an Animation, Simulate a Research Model, or Solve a Problem-Set Problem in 60 Seconds, and Other Mathematica Tips and Tricks
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

Mathematica and its underlying language, the Wolfram Language, is useful to very quickly create calculations and visualizations to support any type of course involving computation (not just Mathematics). Students will learn how to perform calculations with standard Wolfram Language syntax or with Wolfram|Alpha style (i.e., using natural language processing to replace rigid syntax), create animations or interactive GUIs, efficiently learn and use the Wolfram Language, and share ideas or projects over the web with anyone which include live computations. Several additional examples will be shown involving data analysis, writing efficient code, and other newer aspects of Mathematica. Students will receive a copy of the examples in Wolfram Notebook format to use as a guide, and no prior experience with Mathematica is required.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/97381356971

Activity Leaders:
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science
Kelvin Mischo, Coauthor of Hands-on Start to Wolfram Mathematica, 3rd Edition

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Using The Wolfram Language and Mathematica for your Problem Sets, Research, and Learning
Jan/14 Fri 03:00PM–04:00PM

Millions of students all over the world use the Wolfram Language as a reliable and powerful tool for doing computations in calculus. During this talk, I will give an overview of recent initiatives to build on these computational capabilities and transition the Wolfram Language to a system for learning the fundamental concepts, theorems and applications of calculus. These initiatives include a successful program for solving all the exercises in a popular calculus textbook using the Wolfram Language,  fully refreshed documentation pages with textbook-style examples for single and multivariable calculus,  large benchmark comparisons  for limits, integrals and other basic calculus operations, and free online courses along with cohort-based study groups for calculus and related areas of the undergraduate curriculum. The overall goal of this program is to apply the Wolfram Language for making calculus education accessible and enjoyable for students everywhere.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/93353326576

Activity Leaders:
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science
Devendra Kapadia, Wolfram Research

Computational modeling tools for promoting low-carbon electricity
Jan/24 Mon 09:00AM–01:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 09:00AM–01:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 09:00AM–01:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 09:00AM–01:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 09:00AM–01:00PM

Monday, January 24-Friday, January 28, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm ET each day (5 classes)
Location: E51-376
Register by January 19. Email Pablo Duenas (pduenas@mit.edu) and Karen Tapia-Ahumada (katapia@mit.edu)
More information

This 5-session intensive activity presents power system analysis techniques that will help in modeling and understanding the role of electric power systems in a carbon-constrained economy. The massive deployment of intermittent renewable energy sources (RES), the anticipated surge of active demand response or the development of smart grids are among the challenges that must be faced by the mathematical models for optimization, analysis and simulation of the complex decision-making processes in power systems. Apart from a theoretical description of the models, the instructors will provide the students with a collection of prototypes that will allow them to run study cases and to understand the effect of the different mathematical formulations on the outcomes. The use of these models in some real-world applications will also be presented.
 
Part I: Economic dispatch
      1. Economic dispatch and unit commitment with RES
      2. Stochastic unit commitment with RES
Part II: Operation planning
      3. Mid-term hydro-thermal coordination
      4. Deterministic and stochastic model
Part III: Microgrids
      5. Microgrid design
      6. Resiliency through multi-microgrid 
Part IV: Generation expansion planning 
      7. Generation expansion planning
      8. GenX model
Part V: Transmission expansion planning 
      9. Transmission expansion planning
    10. openTEPES model
 
Prerequisites: None (some GAMS/Python familiarity is helpful)
Limited enrollment: 30 participants

 

Conflict of Interest and Startups at MIT
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

MIT’s sponsored research exceeds $750M annually, with funding received from federal agencies, private foundations, and industry. MIT also has a global reputation for its startup, innovation, and entrepreneurial culture with 30+ startups launched annually in collaboration with the MIT Technology Licensing Office (TLO).
 
This seminar is designed to build your financial conflict of interest (fCOI) knowledge base by presenting the history and evolution of the financial conflict of interest in research regulations, providing an overview of the COI process at MIT, and outlining the benefits of a collaborative process with the TLO.
 
Rupinder Grewal, MIT COI Officer, and Linda Chao, Technology Licensing Officer, will provide historical context and insight into topics, including the discussion of these and other questions:
 

  • Given the financial drivers of the for-profit world, how does MIT ensure that objectivity is maintained in its fundamental research activities? 
  • How does MIT protect research results from influence when an Investigator has outside financial interests?
  • What kinds of fCOI situations arise in our environment and how do we manage them?
  • How do researchers navigate potential COI issues in startup activities?
Cybersecurity: 5th Generation of Security
Jan/28 Fri 01:00PM–03:00PM

Cybersecurity mechanisms to date are inadequate.   Moving Target Defenses ─ the Fourth Generation of Security - while beneficial, is incomplete. Third Generation ─ Tolerance and Survivability - solutions have been characterized as Hope and Pray.  

Data Security grapples with distributed networks for Supply Chains, Remote Work Environments, International Trade, Ransomware, and the Insider Threats.  

Can the next generation of security address cyber challenges of Misaligned Incentives, Information Asymmetry, and Externalities? Is Cybersecurity still a TECHNOLOGY discussion? Will vulnerabilities impose new compliance and monitoring requirements, or drive new information sharing partnerships?  The presentation highlights critical infrastructures, as well as commercial and government perspectives.

Leading the discussion will be:

Everardo Ruiz, Ph.D, SDM ’00 and 
COL (Ret) Robert Banks, Ph.D.

This event is in-person and space is limited. Registration is available via Eventbrite.

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/11 Tue 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98703478477

(registration not required).

To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/19 Wed 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/95624917949 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/20 Thu 05:30PM–06:00PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/93930057732 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/27 Thu 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98566612079 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Developing Industry-Sponsored Research Agreements
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

Are you interested in following an academic research career solving challenging problems across the globe? Industry sponsors around the world can be a rich source of scientific problems and funding for your academic research at MIT or elsewhere. But, have you wondered how to go about securing funding and an agreement? Or, have you found it challenging to get a sponsored research agreement in place?

 

Our talk will introduce you to key concepts and policies that are involved in developing an agreement with your sponsor. We will explore topics including: technology readiness level (TLR), statement of research work, confidentiality, background/foreground IP, and much more in relation to agreements. Understanding these policies will help smoothen the process at MIT (and elsewhere) and shorten the time to secure an agreement with your industry sponsor.

About the speakers:

Grace Leung joined OSATT in March of 2020. As a Catalyst, Grace works with MIT researchers in engaging with industrial sponsors and collaborators, negotiates the appropriate agreements, and establishes major research alliances. Prior to joining MIT, Grace held positions in technology licensing and business development at Mass General Brigham and Harvard University. She led negotiations and executed early-stage technology licenses and industrial sponsored research agreements, and established intellectual property protection and marketing strategies of life-science innovations. Grace holds a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology and Microbiology from Tufts Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

Michael Leskiw is an Alliance Manager in MIT’s Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer (OSATT). Michael’s portfolio extends to international engagements with foreign governments, as well as several high-visibility major agreements with multi-national corporations. Michael has been at MIT since 2004 and previously worked in MIT’s sponsored programs office, and prior to that on the operational side ramping up MIT’s largest international research center (based in Singapore) and a collaborative project helping to start a new university in Moscow. Michael is a licensed attorney in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Subarna Basnet PhD, is a Catalyst at Office of Strategic Alliance and Technology Transfer (OSATT), and an expert in technology & design innovation. Previously, as the Director for Design Science, Technology, and Innovation at the MIT International Design Center (IDC), he led efforts in developing research and educational programs for the Center. Prior to MIT, Subarna served in the industry (Bose, Xerox, Softech) for over 20 years, contributing in diverse areas, ranging from research, design and development, manufacturing, and sales. Subarna holds a PhD from MIT in Mechanical Engineering.

Leah Keating is a Senior Strategic Transactions Officer and OSATT’s RAS Liaison. Leah’s responsibilities include supporting and improving coordination between RAS and the OSATT Strategic Transactions Team, as well as negotiating and reviewing research and other sponsored agreements of all kinds. She works closely with teams in RAS and OSATT to support interoffice and inter-team communications and operations, and on developing new or improved agreement workflows. Prior to MIT, Leah was the Director of Research Administration for Harvard Law School for 4 years, where she managed all operations of HLS research administration. efore joining HLS, she was the Associate Director for Technology Transactions for the Office of Technology Development (OTD) at Harvard. At OTD, Leah worked closely with the Office of Sponsored Programs, the sponsored research administration offices for Harvard Medical School. Leah holds a B.A. in French from Hamilton College and a J.D. from Suffolk University Law School.

 

Register Now
 

Do Right by Your Research Data
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM

Congratulations—you’ve got research data! This session will walk you through the dos and don’ts associated with research data and artifacts, all of those associated bits of information necessary to understand research data. These can include structured data, images, unstructured data, metadata, analysis scripts, analysis environment, and much more. We’ll cover the tools and resources available to you for making decisions about your research data (and associated bits) with regard to use agreements, security requirements, and copyright and licensing. We’ll also explore some case studies and do a practical applications exercise.

 

Amy Nurnberger is the Program Head for Data Management Services at MIT libraries. Amy also serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Learning Analytics program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Within the broader research data community, Amy is a co-chair of the Research Data Alliance (RDA)/World Data Services Publishing Data Workflows Working Group and the RDA Education and Training on Handling Research Data Interest Group, and she is the elected co-chair of the RDA Organizational Advisory Board. She also sits on the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee and the editorial board of Patterns - The Science of Data.

Emergency Preparedness for Your Home
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:00PM

People and families that plan for emergencies will:

  • Help keep people safe;
  • Limit property damage;
  • Know what to do during and after a disaster;
  • Better manage their savings;
  • Support community preparedness; and
  • Help their community get back up and running after a disaster.

Taking simple actions to protect against disaster helps you, your family, your community, and your country in important ways.  This training will help guide you through the initial stages for developing your own resposne plans for your home and loved ones.

Experimental Apparatus Design
Jan/19 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–04:00PM

In this course you will work with a team to generate concept documents for idea generation, to evaluate concept documents, to create mini-proposals for an apparatus to test your idea, review mini-proposals, and finally how to produce Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) or Manuals as needed to document how to maintain and operate the apparatus. Intended for Graduate Students, Senior Undergraduates, or Postdoctoral Researchers interested in developing physical experimental equipment.

Leader: Brian Neltner

Participants must attend all 4 sessions.

Enrollment limit: 12. Deadline Jan 14, 2022. To enroll, contact Brian Neltner, neltnerb@mit.edu

Freezer Challenge 2022 Information Session
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–11:00AM

Looking for ways to reduce the environmental impact of scientific research, save energy on freezers, improve access to your samples, and get recognized for your efforts?

 

Join us during this information session to learn more about the 2022 International Laboratory Freezer Challenge and how you can participate and implement optimal cold storage management practices. All labs with freezers / refrigerators are encouraged to participate and get recognized in the 2022 International Laboratory Freezer Challenge, organized by My Green Lab with the International Institute for Sustainable Laboratories (I2SL). 

 

Presented / sponsored by: MIT Safe and Sustainable Labs (S2L) Program

A joint initiative between Environment, Health and Safety (EHS), Department of Facilities (DOF), and Office of Sustainability (MITOS) in alignment with MIT's Climate Action Plan.

Gene Regulation and Expression Talk Series: "Fundamental Principles During the Egg-to-embryo Transition"
Jan/11 Tue 12:00PM–01:00PM

Dr. Andrea Pauli, Group Leader at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Vienna

Hands on Full Duplex Radio - IAP
Jan/25 Tue 01:00PM–03:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–03:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–03:00PM

Design, build and test your own full-duplex radio with real-world hardware/software engineering!

 

Full-duplex technology is revolutionizing the wireless world! This system concept is fundamentally different that traditional radios that divide transmission and reception in either time and/or frequency. Future networks will leverage this emerging technology to improve efficiency and enhance mobile user experiences. This course will introduce students to the various self-interference cancellation techniques that enable full-duplex operation in wireless systems and will allow them to create their own full-duplex radios through hands-on engineering with real-world hardware/software.

Email Ken Kolodziej to register for the class.

Hands on Holography IAP
Jan/19 Wed 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 09:00AM–12:00PM

This course will explore the fascinating applications of holography. What is holography? It is not merely art; holography encompasses a variety of measurement and recording techniques at the intersection of wave-propagated interference and diffraction. Consequently, it enjoys utility and relevance across physics domains, from low radio frequencies through optical wavelengths, to X-ray and beyond. This course will demystify holography by covering fundamental theory coupled with hands on laboratory sessions. During the laboratory sessions students will create their own computer generated holograms and a traditional optical hologram to take home.  

Email: gregory.balonek@ll.mit.edu for information on how to register.

How Birds Work
Jan/24 Mon 11:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 11:00AM–12:00PM

Offered by Prof. Lorna Gibson. Birds are amazing. In this series of talks, we’ll look at the materials science of feathers; the mechanics of bird bones; the versatility of bird bills; as well as bird flight and migration. There will be 5, one-hour talks from Monday through Friday 11AM-12PM. Participants are welcome at individual sessions. No prerequisites. First come first served. Signup here.

How it Really Works: Planning, Funding, and Implementing Transportation Projects in the Real World
Jan/20 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

Have you ever wondered how transportation really works? (Have you ever wondered how ANYTHING really works?) Do you have strong feelings, or simply a passing interest? Come and join our discussion session! Everyone is welcome regardless of background or status -- we welcome a wide range of perspectives.

Transportation has never been more exciting: scooters, drones, autonomous vehicles, ridesharing, big data, climate change, energy, equity, economics. But actually making things happen requires an understanding of real-world decision-making, and considering these new developments in transportation gives us an opportunity to study the choices and constraints available to today's planners, all now further complicated by the uncertainties and changes posed by Covid-19 and shifting travel patterns. This session will offer a practice-oriented overview of the issues, players, and trends most relevant to contemporary transportation planning, featuring two MIT/DUSP alumni currently working in the field.

Pre-registration required: https://mit.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsce-gpjItGdH-Wh1Ip6ZHcYo9S8OZQ6Au

How to Carve Your Path in the Biopharmaceutical Industry
Jan/10 Mon 03:00PM–05:00PM

Tamara Reyes-Robles, PhD, Associate Principal Scientist, Chemical Biology, Exploratory Science, Center, Merck

Nina Leksa, PhD, Distinguished Scientist, Lab Head, Hemophilia and Musculoskeletal Disease Research Center, Sanofi

Amaris Torres Delgado, PhD, Senior Scientist, Process Development, Amgen

Cynthia Barber, PhD, Senior Director, Program Management, Vertex

Amgen, Merck, Vertex and Sanofi are multinational biopharmaceutical companies with 20,000-100,000 employees generating numerous commercially available drugs. In this session, we will chat with scientists working in each of these companies to learn about their company culture, structure, and different career paths. Join us for an engaging discussion on what it takes to succeed in biopharma and learn about the challenges and benefits of working in such well established companies.

Session organizer: Fiona Aguilar

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/94822544788

Password: MITBiology

How to Navigate the Biotech Startup Network
Jan/28 Fri 03:00PM–05:00PM

Ohad Yosefson, PhD, Associate Director of Protein Sciences, Repertoire Immune Medicines

Nathan Young, PhD, Associate Director of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, Ikena Oncology

Megan Warner, PhD, Senior Scientist, Protein Sciences, CRISPR Therapeutics

The Boston biotech sector is booming with scientific innovation, investments, and company creation. In this session, we will chat with scientists from three different biotech companies to learn how to navigate a career in a constantly evolving company while managing expectations and responsibilities. Learn about their previous experiences and job roles and inquire about their thoughts on the biotech landscape.

Repertoire Immune Medicines is a series B funded Flagship Pioneering company seeking to rationally engineer T cell receptor (TCR)-antigen interactions. Ikena Oncology is a public company focusing on genetically defined or biomarker-driven cancer targets. CRISPR Therapeutics is a public gene editing company developing treatments for hemoglobinopathies, cancer, and diabetes. All three are clinical-stage companies at the frontline of innovation.

Session organizer: Fiona Aguilar

Tentative: hybrid mode 68-181

Otherwise, Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/95349775648

Password: MITBiology

Hypocrisy: If Jesus Christ is so Good, Why is the Church so Bad?
Jan/18 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

In a recent survey at MIT, students were asked, “For you, what makes Christianity or God's existence difficult for you to believe?” The most picked answer was the hypocrisy they see in those who identify as Christian and the Church. There is no arguing that hypocrisy exists among Christians and the Church. Hypocrisy is a massive deterrent for people no matter who it comes from. If Christianity is supposed to make people better, then why associate with something that doesn’t really seem to work? Why accept it as true? How can it be worth considering when it seems like Christians don’t even follow its teachings?

LOU PHILLIPS, Traveling speaker with the Lighten Group, Theological studies at the OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS

IAP - Decoding Happiness
Jan/18 Tue 11:00AM–12:00PM

While everyone seeks happiness seldom does one find true happiness. 

Modern cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience still find it hard to explain the complete science of happiness. In a world where various companies and advertisements create hope for people to find happiness in their products, happiness is seldom found in those products, while even if found it is short-lived. In such a scenario, it is imperative for a man of intelligence to explore the science of happiness and how to find true happiness. 

Why each individual has a different degree of happiness? Why aren't we happy always to the highest degree? Is there a science to understand happiness? Is there a set of principles that would help us improve the quality and extent of happiness? If these are some of the questions that bother you, join us for a unique enlivening session to explore the timeless Vedic understanding of happiness.

When: 11 am, Tuesday, Jan 18, 2022

RSVP: tinyurl.com/mithappiness

IAP - Yoga Sutras 101
Jan/17 Mon 11:00AM–12:00PM

Yoga Sutras 101 introduces fundamental concepts of yoga principles. This is an introductory workshop is based on Patanjali's Yoga Sutras. This practical class presents the fundamental concepts of yoga, the various yoga paths, and practical insights on how to practice yoga. This workshop would also highlight some of the misconceptions of modern yoga systems and how to avoid common pitfalls in practicing yoga. 

Students will be able to learn simple, practical, and effective yoga techniques which can be applied in one's daily living. Join us to deepen your yoga practice and lead a life of joy, peace, and good health. This workshop is offered by the Vaishnava Hindu Chaplain at MIT, Sadananda Dasa, who has been a yoga practitioner for more than a decade.  

When: 11 am, Monday, Jan 17, 2022

RSVP: tinyurl.com/mityogasutras

IAP 2022: Mission Innovation Program—Dual-use Ventures: Navigating Both Commercial & Defense Markets
Jan/19 Wed 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM–05:00PM

Program Description

The Dual-use Ventures non-credit IAP course helps technology startups navigate early-stage challenges in market research, use cases, and federal funding opportunities. We provide insights into navigating SBIRs, STTRs, and other federal funding opportunities while working within the commercial marketplace so that tech founders - when thoughtful and working rigorously - can take their Minimum Viable Product from $0 in revenue to $1,500,000 in defense contracts over the course of 24 months. This program is intentional about instruction and training - our eminent goal is to help MIT-affiliated lab-based tech startups traverse the trough of disillusionment and commercialize tough tech products for the betterment of humankind. 

This course is for students, alumni, and ecosystem members who want to learn useful and actionable steps to create dual-use ventures (DuV). A dual-use venture is one that has both government and commercial (enterprise and/or consumer) customers. We’ll discuss frameworks, funding opportunities, entrepreneur roadmaps, and government resources. Topics in this course are particularly relevant to technology entrepreneurs interested in learning more about working with the Department of Defense.

MIT strives to enable higher levels of diversity and inclusion in the innovation ecosystem. Research shows that diversity is a key factor for innovation, helping unearth inherent biases in technological solutions, enabling teams to make better decisions, and driving stronger performance. We strongly encourage members of traditionally marginalized communities to participate in this course.

This series offers presentations over zoom from MIT and government speakers, a networking event, and plenty of opportunities to ask questions on topics we have found tech startups are most interested in learning more about.

                                             REGISTER

Course Thesis

Startups can be purposeful about designing their company to be ready to pursue both commercial and defense markets. This requires being informed, prepared, diligent, and ready when either market opportunity becomes available.

Key Outcomes

  • Learn about non-dilutive funding opportunities, nuances of the defense and dual-use markets, and stakeholders in the defense acquisitions system
  • Understand the need to move opportunistically across both commercial and defense markets in the early stages of ventures
  • Learn how government data rights interact with a dual-use venture’s commercially oriented IP strategy
  • Gain insights on how to protect the long-term value of your technology for both commercial and government markets
  • Achieve an actionable understanding of DOD contractual requirements for cybersecurity and information protection

Schedule
(updated regularly & subject to change)

Day 1 | Wednesday, January 19, 2022 | Dual-use, broadly…

Day 2 | Thursday, January 20, 2022 | My tech startup has a call with the military…

 Day 3 | Friday, January 21, 2022 | Startup funding pinball…

 

                                             REGISTER

SPEAKERS

IAP Course - nanoStories: Workshop on science communication at the nanoscale
Jan/04 Tue 02:30PM
Jan/06 Thu 02:30PM
Jan/11 Tue 02:30PM
Jan/13 Thu 02:30PM
Jan/18 Tue 02:30PM
Jan/20 Thu 02:30PM

Designed for students with an interest in science communication and STEAM outreach. Guided by instructors, in each two-hour class students will explore a new topic, jointly developing an instructional narrative to be told in text, video, and/or interactive multimedia. Outside of MIT labs, nanoscience and nanotechnology appear mysterious. Help us demystify them! The content of the classes will reflect research/exploratory interests of participants.

Instructors: Prof. Vladimir Bulovic, Director of MIT.nano; Dr. Annie Wang, Research Scientist; and Samantha Farrell, Administrative Assistant; and special guest speakers from MIT.nano, the MIT News Office, PBS Nova and TedX Boston. 

Tuesday & Thursday starting January 4 and ending January 20 (Jan. 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20).

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Register for this course.

Registration deadline: January 3, 2022. Open to MIT community, limited to 60 participants. To receive course credit (optional), register for 6.S090 (U, 6-units).

 

IAP Course- Hands-on Fabrication on Zoom
Jan/24 Mon 04:00PM

Learn about micro-fabrication techniques, and join us via Zoom for a live fabrication demo inside the MIT.nano cleanrooms! Learn about thin-film deposition, lithography, and etching processes at the micro- and nano-scale—and how to combine these techniques to build a semiconductor device (such as you might find in your computers or phones). For our demo, we’ll start by taking a screenshot in Zoom and then use the MIT.nano tools to turn it into a diffraction grating on a silicon wafer! At the end of the session, we’ll place the wafer inside the window of the fab, so you can come by and see it (safely from outside the building), whenever you’re back on campus!

Instructor: Jorg Scholvin, Assistant Director of User Services, Fab.nano

Monday, January 24, 2021
4:00 PM – 6:30 PM EST

Register for this course

No enrollment limit, and open to all members of the MIT community.
 
Interested undergraduates can also check out the 6.152J lab for a hands-on lab using MIT.nano this spring (you’ll be the one actually using the equipment in the lab—to design, build and test your own device ideas). Read about the Fall 2019 course at MIT News.

IAP Course: A practical introduction to biomechanics
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM

Most of us learn to breathe and walk and move at a time that we can’t recall much from and use these skills throughout our lives without really knowing how exactly they work, and how to improve them. Several scientists and artists have spent their lives deciphering how these processes work. Their insights can help you perfect your craft if you are an athlete, martial artist, performance artist, or even interested in improving your health and well-being.

In this course, you will see how motion capture and physiological recordings can be applied to understand more deeply how our body achieves tasks that seem intuitive and easy to us, and how these tools can be used in research, education, and athletic and artistic improvement.

Hosted by the MIT.nano Immersion Lab
Instructor: Dr. Praneeth Namburi, Postdoctoral Associate

January 25, 2022
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

This will be a 1-day virtual course on Tuesday, Jan 25 from 10am to 12pm. (Please note the change from the original listing.)

Register for this course.

This course is sponsored by the MIT.nano Immersion Lab, which provides space, tools, and a platform to connect scientists and engineers with artists, musicians, and performers through creative projects that bridge multiple disciplines. It also showcases the capabilities of the MIT Clinical Research Center, which supports human research and medical innovation.

Registration deadline: January 21, 2022. 

IAP Course: Eyes in the Sky
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–02:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 08:00AM–04:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 08:00AM–04:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM
Jan/24 Mon 10:00AM–02:00PM

Hands-on Workshop for using UAVs in mapping the built environment and Climate Change risk assessment (Non-credit)

Enrollment Limit: 15 students

Complete this online form to sign up

Drones are providing us with new ways to map, monitor, and measure our changing landscape. Advances in digital image processing enable one to go from flying a drone to working with accurate maps and 3D models in a matter of hours. In this workshop, students will learn how to use drones and other geospatial technologies to help them better understand our changing environment. Upon completion of this workshop, students will have theoretical and applied knowledge that will aid them to use UAVs in various applications.

In this workshop, students will gain hands-on experience with drone vehicles, sensors, image processing software and applications. With the proliferation of drones there are increasing opportunities to use drones for scientific remote sensing data acquisition and applications. This workshop focuses on understanding the fundamentals behind acquiring imagery data with drone-based cameras (e.g. multi-spectral and thermal) and processing the data for various applications.

Learning outcomes

• Understand how to use drones as a platform to acquire data
• Understand components and functions of a drone system, DJI as the main platform
• Understand the photogrammetric principles of drone-based image acquisition and processing in Drone Deploy platform
• Understand basic flight planning and data acquisition with a drone
• Develop insight into drone operation and basic maneuvering.
• Understand how to operate various drone-based sensors, RGB camera, LiDar, and Thermal.
• Develop the ability to process drone-derived raw data imagery (RGB camera, Multispectral, Thermal, LiDAR) to various applications.
• Gain oversight of the complete mission pipe-line, from planning to final product.
• Learn to present research proposals and complete a project as a team member

Format

Students will work in teams of 3-5 students to apply basic flight planning and flight procedures to a mapping problem. Each team will work with a qualified flying instructor during the data collection process to develop a flight checklist, flight plan, GCP plan and produce an 2D orthomosaic and 3D model from UAV data using drone deploy platform. Each team will present the processing output at the end of the workshop and key insights on using UAVs in urban mapping and climate change problems.

Notes

• Students will not be required to acquire their own data as the data will be acquired by the qualified drone instructors with students participating in the data collection.
• This course will not lead directly to certification of students for operating a drone.
• The course is not about flying drones, but about understanding how to acquire and process remote sensing data.

Complete this online form to sign up

Recommended Reading

Jensen, John R, 2017. Drone Aerial Photography and Videography: Data Collection and Image Interpretation. Amazon Kindle store or Apple iBooks store. NOTE: The Amazon Kindle store version is recommended as it can be viewed on either the Microsoft Windows or the Apple operating systems.

Course Instructors: Norhan Bayomi, Postdoctoral Fellow, Building Technology Program, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative; Prof. John E. Fernandez, Director of the Urban Metabolism Group (Building Technology Program), Director of MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative.

Co-Instructor: Marcela Angel, Research Associate, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative.

Schedule

Tuesday, January 18:

  • Lecture: Introduction to UAVs Platform and sensing applications (10:00 to 11:00 am)
  • Lecture: UAVs application in the Built Environment - Thermal Imaging (11:30 to 12:30 pm)
  • Tutorial: Class Structure and field study regulations (1:30 to 2:30 pm)

Wednesday, January 19

  • Drone Operations 101 (8:00 to 11:00 am Class session A)
  • Basic Flight Training (12-1pm Class session B)
  • Field Training Session (1 – 4 pm)

Thursday, January 20

  • Lecture: UAVs application in Climate Change Risk Assessment (8:00 to 9:00 am)
  • Drone Data Processing Mapping & Modelling (9:30 to 12:30)
  • Field Training Session (1 – 4 pm)

Friday, January 21

  • Lecture: UAVs Data Type and Processing Platforms (9:00 to 10:00 am)
  • Field Training: Hands on Data Collection with drones in Briggs Field

Monday, January 24

  • Projects Presentation (10-1)
  • Final Tips (1-2 pm)
IAP Course: Introduction to Blender: Modeling, materials, and simulations
Jan/19 Wed 12:00AM

Introduction to Blender: Modeling, materials, and simulations is an introductory class that provides a basic overview of the Blender software. During this two-hour session, we will introduce 3D modeling, materials, and simulations in Blender and help you kickstart your own 3D creations. This session is designed to give you the resources and skills to create your own 3D models that can be applied to game design, architecture, simulations, animations, and more. (beginners)

Hosted by the MIT.nano Immersion Lab
Instructor: Talis Reks, AR/VR/Gaming/Big Data IT Technologist

January 19, 2022
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Virtual 

Register for this course.

Registration deadline: January 8, 2022

IAP Course: Teaching with Sustainability
Jan/05 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM

Enrollment: Limited: Advance sign-up required. 

Attendance: Participants must attend all sessions.

Prereq: None.

This non-credit class will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to infuse their lessons and practices with sustainability. The class will focus on identifying goals for students and actions to get there, what it means to teach sustainably, and the opportunity to plan for future lessons using sustainability as a guide. In addition, participants will learn sustainable pedagogical practices that increase student engagement, and ultimately learning, in their classes.

Sustainability education is an emergent field focused on solving complex wicked problems that are interconnected throughout social, environmental, economic and health fields. In working to address these inherently complex and wicked sustainability problems scholars have identified the need to perturb existing education systems, advocating for education of a different kind which will create a more sustainability literate population. To achieve the lasting impact necessary for true change to occur sustainability needs to be holistically integrated throughout an academic program leveraging the knowledge of instructors to build this complex connection. This class will help participants think through what sustainability means in their area of expertise, while practicing this in terms of best teaching practices.

Anyone is welcome to participate, however, the class will be tailored to individuals who are currently teaching (i.e. graduate students, postdocs, faculty, lecturers) or those who may be teaching in the future.

Signup Deadline: December 22. E-mail the instructors to sign up.

Instructors:

  • Liz Potter-Nelson, Sustainability Education Postdoctoral Associate at ESI, epottern@mit.edu
  • Sarah Meyers, Education Program Manager at ESI, smeyers@mit.edu

Schedule:

4, 2-hour sessions, from 10am-noon

  • Wednesday, January 5th
  • Wednesday, January 12th
  • Wednesday, January 19th
  • Wednesday, January 26th
IAP Non-Credit Activity: Comics on COVID
Jan/13 Thu 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 02:00PM–04:00PM

How can a mix of words with pictures crack open new ways to understand the Covid pandemic? For two years, our bodies have been immersed in a blind, planetary-scale battle with nature’s most ruthless, efficient manifestation: the virus, a mindless mutagenic that has confounded humankind’s ability to collectively rally and oppose. As we struggle to find new ways to communicate about the toll and tragedy of this pandemic, can the comics form offer a transformative new way to understand what we have endured, what we owe one another as a species, and how to reckon with our blind spots when it comes to “following the science”? In this two-day workshop, we dive into these questions by first exploring three comics examples that try to break ground in communicating new insights about how humans interact with the inanimate or with each other. We will then reconvene to put words and pictures into action, to draw a two-page comic that tries to tell a story and capture an aesthetic sensibility—or feeling—of what it means to endure and to sacrifice, before this mutating viral arms race is finally won. 

 

Students in this class will first have a crash course 2-hour workshop in the formal features and epistemology (“how we know, what we know”) of comics: an introduction to the principles of framing, juxtaposition, closure, and threading—using words and pictures to imagine a new “linguistic method” of communicating. Then, students reconvene one week later, for a 2-hour workshop in which they design and layout a two-page rough comic in small teams, and participate in a studio critique of their experimental work.

 

Limited to 12 participants. Advance signup required; email the instructors to signup; signup deadline Jan. 7, 2021.

IAP Seminar: Investigating Leadership and Engineering through Film and Media: The Making of the Atomic Bomb
Jan/11 Tue 01:00PM–02:30PM

Speakers:
Andrew Silver, Film director, MIT and Sloan Alum
Chris Boebel, Media Development Director, MIT Open Learning

Enrollment limited: Advance sign-up required. Sign-up by 12/15

Using an award-winning BBC mini-series, along with supplemental references from film and books, participants will observe and discuss the leadership of one of the largest engineering projects in history: The “Manhattan Project” that designed and built the world’s first atomic bomb. In a small seminar setting, students will consider leadership of the project and moral responsibility in the context of the devastating use of atomic weapons at the close of World War II, clashing leadership styles between scientists and the military, and how these concerns relate to broader questions of leadership and ethics on complex scientific and engineering projects.

Interested students should contact Andrew Silver (e-mail below) for more information. View trailer.

This course will meet for two sessions:

Session One: Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Leadership “Personas,” Clashing Leadership Styles, Collaboration, and Managing Personalities
Episode 3 of “Oppenheimer” (1980), BBC-TV TV Mini-Series starring Sam Waterston

Session Two: Thursday, January 13, 2022, 1pm-2:30 pm
Morality, Ethics, and Personal Responsibility
Episode 5 of “Oppenheimer”

Both sessions will meet at MIT Open Learning, 600 Technology Square, 2nd Floor

Sponsor(s): MIT Open Learning

Contact: Andrew Silver, asilver@asilverproduction.com

IAP: (Closed) Introduction to American Sign Language
Jan/05 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/06 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/07 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/10 Mon 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/13 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/14 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/17 Mon 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM

Global Languages is happy to offer a non-credit class, Introduction to American Sign Language, during IAP 2022. Ten sessions will be held from January 5 to January 19, 10:00 – 11:30 am. This is a virtual / Zoom class. 

This non-credit IAP class is an introduction to elementary aspects of American Sign Language and to Deaf culture for those with no prior experience. Sessions will focus on gaining specific areas of basic understanding/competency which can be applied to later introductory studies of ASL. Participants will also interact with topics including the role of ASL in Deaf history, current culture, and others.

Sessions will be led by Andrew Bottoms. Andrew Bottoms was born and raised in a Deaf family from North Carolina and American Sign Language (ASL) is his native language. Bottoms graduated from Gallaudet University with two bachelor degrees, one in American Sign Language (ASL) and the other in Deaf Studies.

Enrollment is limited to 20 participants with the expectation of attendance at all 10 sessions. Open to members of the MIT community.

Registration is required. All registrants will be contacted by December 23 with confirmation of enrollment or information on placement in a wait list (in the event of over-enrollment).

Registration closed!
Please sign interest form for future activities!

Due to interest well exceeding capacity, Global Languages has closed registration for ASL in IAP. Those who submitted a registration form will be contacted regarding enrollment or placement on the wait list.

If you are interested in future activities related to American Sign Language and Deaf culture, please submit your name and email at this Interest Form.

Global Languages is appreciative of the great show of interest in ASL and we hope we can bring such opportunities to the MIT community again soon.

 

IAP: How to explain fusion energy to anyone
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:00PM

Offered by children's book author Kathryn Hulick.

Fusion energy is complicated. It involves ionized gases, superconducting magnets, tritium breeding, and more. Although the science behind all of this is indeed complex, it's also exciting. With some creativity and enthusiasm, you can explain fusion energy in a way that anybody can understand. That's exactly what Kathryn Hulick did in her new book for kids and teens, Welcome to the Future: Robot Friends, Fusion Energy, Pet Dinosaurs, and More. The book explains how ten different technologies could transform the world in the future. It also challenges readers to think about how they want the world to change. In this talk, she'll read from her chapter about fusion energy. She'll explain how she approached researching and writing about this subject, including how she decided what to include and what to leave out. She'll offer tips on how to explain scientific research to journalists, students, or the public in a way that makes eyes light up and mental gears spin. Fusion energy isn't JUST complicated -- it's also fun. 

Bio: Kathryn Hulick is the author of two books for teens, Welcome to the Future: Robot Friends, Fusion Energy, Pet Dinosaurs, and More (Quarto, 2021), about how technology could change the world in the future, and Strange But True: 10 of the World's Greatest Mysteries Explained (Quarto, 2019), about the science and history of ghosts, aliens, and other mysterious things. As a freelance science journalist, she regularly contributes to Science News for Students, Muse magazine, and Front Vision, a Chinese-language science magazine for young people.  Hulick’s favorite part of writing about science is getting to speak with researchers in many different fields. Once, she spoke with an expert on parallel universes while he was shoveling snow from his driveway. Another time, she called a biologist who was out in the field in Africa, watching a herd of elephants. In addition to writing, she enjoys hiking, gardening, painting and reading. Hulick lives in Massachusetts with her husband, son and dog. Her website is http://kathrynhulick.com/ You can follow her on Twitter @khulick or on Instagram or TikTok @kathryn_hulick

IAP: Listening to Place
Jan/05 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM

This is a three-day workshop that examines the history and use of recorded sound as a means to understand our relationship with the environment. Participants will develop both active listening and basic sound recording techniques in tandem, as interrelated tools of perception. We will discuss the relationship between objective and subjective listening as a lens for understanding how our dual role of participant/recorder determines the way we interact with the world.

The workshop will take place over three 2-hour sessions and will cover some basic aspects of the sound-recording and editing process as well as a conceptual framework with the aim of creating an audio portrait of a particular place, chosen by the participant. Participants should have access to an audio recorder, headphones and a computer for editing. Smartphones and earbuds are possible but not ideal. I am happy to discuss why and make recommendations for upgrades before or during the workshop.

Sessions will be in-person, in room 9-217 on three consecutive Wednesdays, from 2-4pm:

Wednesday, 1/5/22
Wednesday, 1/12/22
Wednesday, 1/19/22
 

IAP: Planning for Small Cities
Jan/10 Mon 12:30PM–03:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 08:00AM–03:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 12:30PM–03:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 08:00AM–03:00PM

NOTE: THE SITE VISITS WILL BE HELD IN THE SPRING ON DATES TBD. The meetings with municipal officials will be held as scheduled.

The growth of large metropolitan areas, unforeseen 50 years ago, is a major success story. However, that growth has had impacts on quality of life in these large areas. Issues of affordability, lack of sufficient transit and bicycle networks, and physical disparities between where jobs are being created and where workers live, all create challenges for cities like Boston, San Francisco, and Washington, DC.

This session will look at an emerging trend in urban development – the rise of the Small City. More than previous generations, Millennials are choosing to locate in these second- and third-tier cities as a way of balancing quality of life, employment opportunities, and the benefits of city amenities. These Small Cities – from larger ones such as Grand Rapids, MI, to smaller ones such as Portsmouth, NH – are faced with new planning opportunities and challenges as a result. How to make sure current residents can stay when new residents inevitably drive up the cost of housing and create competition for employment? What about social services and the opportunity faced by New Americans, who are also relocating to Small Cities? The pandemic and increases in working “wherever” appear to be driving this trend even more quickly.

We will meet virtually with officials and stakeholders from two sample communities – Salem, MA and Portland, ME – on two different weeks. In the Spring (date TBD) we will follow up with a walking site visit of each city to learn about how planning efforts have contributed to their evolution from failing 20th century cities to thriving 21st century destinations – and what challenges remain as these cities become more attractive places to live and visit.

Details

Jeff Levine, Lecturer

Enrollment: Limited to 10: Advance sign-up required
Sign-up by 01/03

This class will consist of four sessions:

1/10 (12:30 to 3 pm.) – Salem virtual discussions with stakeholders

TBD (approximately 8 am. to 3 pm.) – Salem site visit

1/24 (12:30 to 3 pm.) – Portland (ME) virtual discussions with stakeholders

TBD (approximately 8 am. to 5 pm.) – Portland site visit”

------

Advance sign up required: https://forms.gle/iZzEUERKxqnFLSr3A

Sponsor(s): Urban Studies and Planning
Contact: Jeff Levine, jrlevine@mit.edu

IAP: Recent exciting fusion results in ICF: how MIT-PSFC contributed
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:00AM

Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have achieved a record 1.3 megajoule energy output substantially exceeding, for the first time, the energy absorbed by the fuel that was used to initiate the fusion process. Learn about these exciting results and how the Plasma Science and Fusion Center's High-Energy-Density Physics division contributed to this success.

Speakers: Patrick Adrian and Neel Kabadi, MIT PSFC

IAP: Studying the stuff of stars in the lab
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:00AM

Instabilities in the Crab Nebula jet; magnetic reconnection in the magnetopause; collisionless shocks in the universe, caused by supersonic plasma flows. These are just some of the astrophysical events  being studied at the PSFC using high-energy-density plasmas generated by laser facilities. Learn more about these phenomena and the laser facilities that support MIT's astrophysical research.

Laboratory astrophysics: Studying the stuff of stars in the lab
Speakers: Tim Johnson and Jacob Pearcy, PSFC

IAP: The SPARC tokamak: Predicting performance in the world's first burning plasma
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–03:00PM

Speaker: Nathan Howard

The SPARC tokamak is scheduled to begin operation in 2025 and will later become the first tokamak to achieve burning plasma conditions.  Its success will pave the way to the realization of fusion as an energy source.   In this talk we will cover the need for fusion energy development and the high field path to fusion.  In particular, we will present a historical overview of the models used to predict tokamak performance and will highlight some of the cutting-edge work going on at MIT that has been used to predict SPARC and increase our confidence in SPARC’s success.

For Zoom link contact: info@psfc.mit.edu

IAP: The early 2022 fusion energy start-up landscape
Jan/27 Thu 11:00AM–12:00PM

Speaker: Sam Wurzel, Technology to Market Advisor, ARPA-E, U.S. Department of Energy

Over the past five years the number of fusion energy startups has doubled and private funding going to fusion companies has grown by a much larger factor. This talk will provide an overview of the fusion energy startup landscape, a discussion of their various approaches to fusion energy, and the historical context. For Zoom link contact: info@psfc.mit.edu 

IAP: The long road to 20 tesla on the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil: A magnet origin story
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM

The long road to 20 tesla on the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil: A magnet origin story

Speaker: Zach Hartwig

In the early morning hours of September 5 2021, the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC), a joint project of the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Commonwealth Fusion Systems, achieved a peak magnetic field in excess of 20 tesla. This moment ushered in a new era of powerful high-field superconducting magnets for science and industrial applications and enabled a long-sought paradigm shift in fusion energy towards smaller, lower cost devices. But how did this come to be? What technologies and pioneers set the stage for the TFMC? How was it possible to execute a project of this scale and innovation in only two years? And why did this happen at MIT and not somewhere else? To answer these questions, this talk will attempt to map the century-long odyssey at MIT in high-field magnet research, development, and operations that laid the foundation for the success of the TFMC Project and then, with the technical and historical context firmly established, provide a more meaningful overview of the TFMC Project itself.

IP Ownership @ MIT
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:30PM

Like many US Universities, the Institute owns intellectual property that is created during research at MIT. Having a clear understanding of the what, why, and implications of this Policy is paramount. Allison Madden, IPIA Assistant at the MIT Technology Licensing Office, will discuss these items as well as the following:

  • What does it mean for MIT to own intellectual property? 
  • What are the implications of signing the Inventions and Proprietary Information Agreement (IPIA)? 
  • How does this impact entrepreneurship and innovation at MIT?

 
This seminar offers an overview of intellectual property policy and processes at MIT and its implications for researchers contributing to discovery through MIT intellectual endeavors. Geared towards principal investigators, students, and other potential inventors.

Impact of AI in Drug Discovery
Jan/12 Wed 01:30PM–03:00PM

Dr. Pat Walters, Senior VP of Computation, Relay Therapeutics

Dr. Gevorg Grigoryan, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Generate Biomedicines

Dr. Eric Ma, Principal Data Scientist, Moderna

The impact of artificial intelligence in drug discovery is becoming more apparent as more and more biopharmaceutical companies are investing heavily in it as well as news of its significant roles in new drugs abound. The flexibility of AI has made it applicable in all areas of pharmaceutical research including small molecules, protein and RNA-based therapeutics. This session will explore this impact with three of the fastest growing biotech companies that are pushing the boundaries of AI in Biology. Our speakers are leading scientific leaders from Relay Therapeutics—a leading company in AI-based small molecule drug design, Generate Biomedicines—a company invested in using AI to design protein-based drugs, and Moderna—a nearly household name that has been at the forefront of revolutionizing vaccine research with the help of AI.

Join us for a session where we learn how these three industry leaders are integrating AI and biology for faster and more effective drug discovery. They will each give a 15-minute talk about their specific research areas and the talks will be followed by an engaging panel discussion. Come learn about how you can position yourself to be part of the AI revolution!

Session organizer: Israel Desta

Wednesday, January 12th, 1:30–3:00 PM, 68-181

Hybrid for attendants, speakers are in-person

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98600056532

Password: MITBiology

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part I)
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers better understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  tech? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current trends that may relate to changing how we write laws regulating new tech?

On the Crypto side, emphasis will be on the examples of NFTs in the music industry, and lessons learned on how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the legal framework of a value exchange system that is built on reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers to inclusivity without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states to emerging  technologies such as bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does ones freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand? These questions and others will be covered by:

  a panel group, including: hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- in Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part II)
Jan/28 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  fields? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current changing trends in  how we write tech laws?

On the Crypto side, we will present the exaple of NFTs in the music industry, asking how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the framework of a value exchange system that is built on inlcusivity, reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers -without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states (osmodata)  to emerging technologies such as  bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does one's freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand?

Andreas and Dimitri will be joined by a panel group, including, hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Introduction to CRISPR (BioMakers Workshop)
Jan/17 Mon 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 03:00PM–05:00PM

Schedule: 2 hour sessions (Jan 17th, Jan 19th, Jan 25th, Jan 27th in the afternoon 3 pm - 5 pm). Only sign-up for one session!

Workshop Contact: Ellie Feng, Kenneth Wei, Angela Gao, Abigail Lo (ellief@mit.edu, kewei@mit.edu, angao@mit.edu, abbylo@mit.edu)

 

Description: An introductory workshop to DNA editing in E. coli using CRISPR/Cas9. Participants will learn the basic mechanism of CRISPR and then transform E. coli with plasmids containing elements of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and observe results!

 

 

Introduction to Defense Contracts
Jan/11 Tue 02:00PM–04:00PM

The Department of Defense is the largest customer in the world, spending approximately $500 billion in contracts every year.  It is also one of the most complex with unique laws, regulations, and policies that can be daunting for companies to navigate.  Learn what the Department of Defense needs, the legal framework in which the military buys technology and services, and important considerations for businesses.  If you are designing your startup's business model, looking to expand your market, curious about government contracts, or fascinated about how a toilet seat can cost $10,000, this class is for you.

This class is offered twice. Please sign up for only one session.

Email abowne@mit.edu to register

To attend go to: https://mit.zoom.us/j/7817098838

Introduction to Defense Contracts
Jan/14 Fri 02:00PM–04:30PM

The Department of Defense is the largest customer in the world, spending approximately $500 billion in contracts every year.  It is also one of the most complex with unique laws, regulations, and policies that can be daunting for companies to navigate.  Learn what the Department of Defense needs, the legal framework in which the military buys technology and services, and important considerations for businesses.  If you are designing your startup's business model, looking to expand your market, curious about government contracts, or fascinated about how a toilet seat can cost $10,000, this class is for you.

This class is offered twice. Please sign up for only one session.

Email abowne@mit.edu to register

To attend go to: https://mit.zoom.us/j/7817098838

Introduction to Microfluidics and Lab on a Chip: Basic Theory, Design, Simulation, and Applications
Jan/27 Thu 09:30AM–12:00PM

This workshop will review the background and fundamental aspects of microfluidics, design and fabrication methods to develop microfluidic devices, simulation of microfluidic systems, and a wide range of applications of microfluidics in different fields of study.


Registration priority given to MIT First Years.

If interested, please send an email to msalek@mit.edu to register.

Sponsor(s): NEET (New Engineering Education Transformation) Program

Introduction to Thermo-Calc
Jan/18 Tue 09:30AM–12:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 09:30AM–12:30PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:30AM–12:30PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:30AM–12:30PM

Offered by Prof. Greg Olson and Clay Houser. This activity is an introduction to the Thermo-Calc software and how it may be used to perform thermodynamic calculations and simulations. Throughout this week, students will be introduced to the CALculation of PHase Diagrams (CALPHAD) methodology and the Thermo-Calc software. We will provide guided examples of thermodynamic, diffusion, and precipitation simulations (Thermo-Calc, DICTRA, and TC-PRISMA). We will also demonstrate use of computational tools for materials design with real-world examples, including an introduction to the TC-Python API. Finally, students will develop understanding of the links between processing, structure, properties, and performance (system design framework). The class will involve instruction and discussion on the theory and function of these tools with guided examples and case studies. Signup here.

Introduction to pump-probe spectroscopy for study of thermal transport in materials
Jan/28 Fri 01:00PM–05:00PM

Pump-probe spectroscopy is a versatile and powerful technique to probe the microscopic dynamics of energy carriers. This course is designed to give a clear picture of pump-probe spectroscopy for the study of phonons in nano- to micron-scale. We will cover fundamentals of related fields including lasers, optics, photonics and technical knowledge to understand working principles and underlying physics of various pump-probe spectroscopy experiments, which have been a great success in the territory of the studies on heat transfer. By solving analytical models and applying data processing methods, we show that pump-probe spectroscopy techniques have successfully measured various types of materials and structures, discovered non-conventional thermal transport in materials and provided unique opportunities building the foundation of modern thermal science.

 

Is it in the Public Domain?
Jan/21 Fri 03:00PM–04:00PM

Explore the public domain in this seminar. When does copyright expire, and how do you know when something is free to use? Katie Zimmerman, Director of Copyright Strategy for MIT Libraries, will discuss the public domain and attendees will put their newly learned skills to use on historical materials from the MIT Libraries.

Isn't Religion Just a Psychological Delusion - Just Wishful Thinking to Comfort People?
Jan/27 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many today would say they do not want to believe in God, but that those who do are driven to do so as a kind of wish fulfillment.  This “You wish” argument against belief in God goes back to Voltaire, Diderot, Darwin, and Feuerbach.  And it was most popularized and sharpened by Freud. Freud referred to religion as “the universal obsessional neurosis of humanity,” and claimed that the spiritual worldview “distorts the picture of the real world in a delusional manner.” Dr. Brandon Unruh will help us examine these claims and critiques from his own lived experience and his professional experience as a clinician.

DR. BRANDON UNRUH, M.D - Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and clinician at McLean Hospital

It Must Be Now! Terri Lyne Carrington, Braxton Cook, and Sean Jones: renowned jazz artists on composing with a social justice lens
Jan/13 Thu 05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 05:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 05:00PM

Three Thursday conversations with renowned jazz artists on composing with a
social justice lens

IAP 2021: It Must Be Now!— Advancing social justice actions through music and media

January 13, 20, and 27: 5:00-6:30pm

Attend individual conversations or the full series as a whole: these events are remote and will be live-streamed on Zoom. This event was previously scheduled for the Lewis Library but will now be a virtual event, register for event link.

Join Terri Lyne Carrington, Braxton Cook, and Sean Jones, the composers for It Must Be Now! (IMBN!) as they each discuss their process for composing new music on themes of racial and social injustice.

IMBN! is a multi-year project culminating in a large-scale work for MIT musicians on May 7th, 2022. These conversations over IAP aim to provide an opportunity for the composers to share the behind-the-scenes of their creative process, and for the MIT/Greater Boston community to engage in open dialogue about how these themes take hold across the MIT campus and beyond.

Attend individual conversations or the full series as a whole. Light refreshments served after each event.

Register here.

____________________________

Between the Light and the Dark

Thursday, January 13th — 5:00-6:30pm

Braxton Cook’s composition dives into the juxtaposition between the light and the dark as he questions where we find ourselves as a society facing the collective trauma of the pandemic and police brutality while attempting to adjust our perspective to emphasize what we have instead of what we’ve lost. The audience conversation will be facilitated by Tracie D. Jones, Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the MIT School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

______________________________

The Resilience of Black Women

Thursday, January 20th — 5:00-6:30pm

Terri Lyne Carrington’s composition investigates the common struggles, inherent truths and sheer resilience of Black women, born into a world of injustice and tasked with navigating the overt and subliminal burdens placed on them while claiming the right to be free and whole. Carrington’s piece reflects on the legacy of creativity and invention of enslaved Africans and their descendants and aims to find a path forward to abolition, self-determination, and justice.

_______________________________

What if we were all connected?

Thursday, January 27th – 5:00-6:30pm

Sean Jones’ composition explores the concept of Pangea (an ancient supercontinent) as an Afrofuturism vehicle, probing the question of whether a more geographically linked world would still cause such deep rifts and misunderstandings of who we are as human beings?

These conversations are sponsored by the MIT Center for Art, Science and Technology, the MIT Lewis Music Library, and MIT Music and Theater Arts.

It Must Be Now! Performance
Saturday, May 7, 2022
More details coming soon

Launch into IAP with MIT.nano
Jan/03 Mon 08:00AM

Join MIT.nano IAP instructors to learn about MIT.nano's offerings during IAP. Ask questions about the classes and workshops, meet MIT.nano staff and fellow MIT community members, and find out what exciting things MIT.nano will offer in-person and virtually during IAP 2022.

This info session will take place virtually and no pre-registration is required.

Visit the MIT.nano 2022 IAP courses website for the zoom link!

 

Leading the Energy Transition - IAP non-credit course
Jan/05 Wed 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–06:00PM

Leading change is never easy but the goal of global decarbonization requires a different approach than the traditional approaches.  Although technical innovations are necessary, they are not sufficient to bring about the global energy transition.  

In the 2022 version of this mini course, we have invited some energy transition leaders from academia/education, industry, government and utilities to inspire us and share their latest strategies in accelerating the energy transition. 

Guest speakers will include:

  • Professor Chris Knittel, Deputy Director, MIT Energy Initiative
  • Professor John Deutch, emeritus Institute Professor in the Chemistry Department
  • Joanna Troy, J.D., Director, Energy Policy and Planning at Commonwealth of Massachusetts
  • Dr. Robert Ethier, Vice President, System Planning, ISO New England
  • Dr. Lene Hviid, Global Key Accounts Manager, Shell Energy
  • Dr. Emre Gencer, Research Scientist, leader of the Sustainable Energy System Analysis Modelling Environment (SESAME), MIT Energy Initiative
  • Dr. Howard Gruenspecht, Senior Energy Economist at MIT Energy Initiative, with many years of experience at IEA, DOE and the White House

The class will meet Wednesdays, 4-6 pm on January 5, 12, 19 and 26. 

To register for the class, please fill out the survey:

https://mit.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1N5eMGpYMRBLmv4

Learning through Doing: MIT TLO Internship
Jan/05 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

Are you interested in the world of Technology Transfer, but unsure of what it is or how to get involved. Join Angela Park, previous TLO Marketing Intern and Robyn Bunch, Marketing & Communications Manager, give an overview of the Technology Licensing Office and how the Marketing Internship Program can help you explore your tech transfer interests. 

Lecture: Medinas of the Maghreb and the concept of Islamic city: Between texts and models.
Jan/25 Tue 05:00PM–06:30PM

On the question of an archetypal model of the Islamic city, several regional scholars and Orientalists have tried to give some answers, each focusing on a specific aspect to the originality of these cities. Some even expressed great skepticism toward the concept of "Islamic city" as an urban ideal of the Muslim world.

The purpose of this lecture is to confront various theoretical conceptions of this issue in order to trace morphological and landscape characteristics of Maghrebi medinas.


The lecture is intended for all audiences interested in the historical development of cities in the Maghreb or Islamic societies more broadly.  No prior knowledge is required. 

Speaker Biography: 
Amine Kasmi is a conservation architect and associate professor at the Department of Architecture, University of Tlemcen, Algeria. He teaches courses and conducts research in the history of urban design with a particular focus on the tensions between modern town planning and traditional urban fabric. His areas of interest also include the interaction between Islamic architecture and other architectures in the medieval Mediterranean world. He worked on numerous urban conservation sites in Algeria as well.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/MaghrebiMedinas 

Legal Dos and Don'ts: What to Know When Starting Your Startup
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Considering starting your own company? There’s more to it than shaking hands with a business partner. Join the Deshpande Center’s IAP webinar on the right legal steps when starting your company.  Hear from legal experts and the Deshpande team, who will discuss important questions to consider as you take your technology to the marketplace.

Advance registration is required.

MAS.S73: Moving Beyond The Replication Crisis: How to Spot Misleading Social Science and Design Better Experiments
Jan/11 Tue 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Offered for 3 credits P/D/F and open to listeners
Meets T/Th 4-6p in E15-359 (1/11, 1/13, 1/20, 1/25, and 1/27)

 

Course Description

 

The replication and generalizability crisis in social psychology has dramatic implications for designers and engineers. Poor research methodology has damaged our understanding of the relationship between human behavior or experience with intervention design; moreover, the statistical mistakes that underlie the crisis continue to threaten modern HCI research. Luckily, there are many useful resources available to help us navigate and understand the existing literature and prevent our work from falling into similar empirical traps.

 

In this class we will separate useful, empirically grounded psychology from common misconceptions; we will review conceptual details and common errors for the most widespread statistical analyses, alongside basic meta-statistics, so we can identify and avoid bias in the literature and in our own research; and we’ll look at future directions that integrate strong psychological science with empirical design.

 

This class has no prerequisites and is tailored towards an intelligent beginner, but we expect even advanced practitioners to find something useful and enjoyable in the material. We hope that the class can serve as a gathering place for those interested in cross-disciplinary work with a psychological basis.
MIT Heavy Metal 101 IAP 2022
Jan/10 Mon 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM

Not a Metallurgy class! This veteran crash-course is coming back in full force and will have you head banging, air guitaring, and devil horn raising in no time! Learn everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal, including how Metallica tries too hard to be cool, why Lemmy IS God (RIP), how the genre tackles some of today's biggest sociopolitical challenges, why metal bands exist in every country on Earth, and why you're probably already a metalhead without even knowing it.  

WARNING: This series most definitely goes to 11!  Earplugs optional. We'll look at metal cultures, explore the fringes of the most extreme forms of metal, and, of course, listen to some SCREAMING HEAVY METAL! This is guaranteed to be the most BRUTAL class ever offered at MIT!

Follow the Zoom links to join any class, and all are welcome to join (even those outside the MIT community). Since we're still remote this year, seating isn't limited and all classes will be held on Zoom. All information can be found at metal.mit.edu

Full 2022 Schedule of Events (All events start at 6:30 PM ET, and links to the Zoom rooms that will be used are listed below. Keep in mind these times may shift depending on outside factors.)

Heavy Metal 101: Music and Culture
Monday January 10, 2022

An introduction to Heavy Metal. Topics include the musicology of Heavy Metal as well as an examination of Heavy Metal culture. This multimedia extravaganza covers everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal!

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal, Part I
Tuesday, January 11, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the late 1960s through the early 1990s. Topics will include Hard Rock, Archetypal Heavy Metal, the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM), Power Metal, Thrash Metal, and the Big 4.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: The GUTS of Metal - Music Theory and Songwriting with Colin Brumley
Wednesday January 12, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Colin Brumley. Titled "The GUTS of Heavy Metal: Metal Music Theory," join us for an evening of metal music theory and songwriting with Colin Brumley of Dormivore and Noctobre. This presentation will be a deep dive into how metal is made and how it works, from the granular to the bird’s-eye view. Topics will include foundations in classical music theory (no prior knowledge needed), scales and modalities utilized in different types of metal, how to expand your listening, and — new this year! — apply these ingredients, augmented with other musicological factors, towards songwriting via analysis of full original songs. We wouldn’t show you how to make the world’s greatest grilled cheese without actually dissecting one! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Panel About Stage Lighting at Metal Concerts with Shannon Knotts and John Santos
Thursday January 13, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest panelists, John Santos and Shannon Knotts. What does it take to build the atmosphere of a live show with light and staging? This panel will feature two light and staging artists/engineers, John Santos and Shannon Knotts, who will discuss the process and challenges of creating successful shows and what sorts of thinking go into their production. Come with questions! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Feminism and Motherhood with Joan Jocson-Singh
Tuesday January 18, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Joan Jocson-Singh. Joining us to discuss her research surrounding Feminism in Metal/Extreme Metal, Vigilante Feminism, and Motherhood's role within metal, Joan will also open a discussion around the larger questions about metal music in academia and the importance of "academicizing" the genre. 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Heavy Metal Electronics 101 with Dr. Gore
Wednesday January 19, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Dr. Görebläster Körpse-härvest Lunden. In this session, MIT alum and physicist Dr. Gore will present an overview of the complete chain of electronic circuits that makes the heavy metal guitar sound the way it does. The class will cover pickups, effects pedals, amplifiers, and speakers, focusing especially on what happens to the electronic waveform each step of the way. There will also be live demonstrations to accompany the theoretical explanations. 

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part II
Thursday January 20, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the early 1990s to the present. Topics include New American Metal, Metalcore and Grindcore, Black Metal, Death Metal, and Extreme Metal.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Metal Makeup and Fashion with Wacky Jacky
Tuesday January 25, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Wacky Jacky. We've looked a lot at how metal formed and took shape over the years. Though, how can you better look the part, and what do the aesthetics say about the genre as a whole? Come by as Jacky explores various metal fashions and how they've evolved over time and across genres. P.S. Bring your battle vests, cuffs, and best corpse paint for this lecture.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Vocals with Paul Buckley
Wednesday January 26, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Paul Buckley. This talk will discuss some background information regarding harsh vocals, how to develop and maintain a harsh vocal style, and examples of how harsh vocals are applied in metal.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part III
Thursday January 27, 2022

This will be a seminar examining the many of the remaining genres of Heavy Metal. Topics will include more obscure genres of Metal Fusion, Experimental and Avant-Garde Metal, and really whatever else we missed so far. It's going to get weird.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal with Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo
Tuesday, February 1, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturers, Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo. Nelson and Daniel will discuss the topic of Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal. Throughout their research, they have revealed that metal as practiced, performed, and promoted in Latin America has a decolonial inflection whereby many bands in the region highlight their respective country’s colonial history and offer ways to challenge the conditions and ideologies inherited from said history. They will also discuss how their work in Latin American metal has inspired and informed a growing interest in the topic of metal in the Global South.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part IV
Thursday February 3, 2022

An extra class? We'll have a couple extra surprises before we close this year out!

Zoom Link

MIT VMS Boot Camp Event: Crash Course in Enterprise B2B Sales 4 Startups
Jan/10 Mon 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 09:00AM–12:00PM

Presented by VMS Mentor Kent Summers:

A 2-Day Crash-Course!

As a popular (14+ year) IAP course on “B2B sales,” this workshop is consistently received by attendees with a great deal of enthusiasm and positive reviews. Highlighting practical knowledge of "how to sell," the sessions provide entrepreneurs starting a new venture and business school graduates entering a new profession with basic sales knowledge, skills and tools for success: how to target enterprise sales opportunities, manage a sales process, acquire customers and generate revenue.  

This boot camp includes 2 days of 3-hour sessions, combining lecture, interactive exercises, and anecdotal evidence from real sales situations. During the 2-day boot camp, you will focus on basic concepts, tools and mechanics for sales focus and efficiency. You will also learn more “qualitative” aspects of selling, with emphasis on how to navigate an organization, overcome obstacles and objections, build buyer team consensus, and negotiate to close deals. Attendees will also troubleshoot “failed sales case studies” and recommend corrective action or behavior. 

Kent Summers has been offering the Sales Boot Camp in collaboration with VMS since 2008. He regularly presents sales workshops at the Harvard MBA program, the Wharton School of Business and many domestic and international business accelerators. Summers founded and sold three software companies in the Boston area, and since 2002, has helped many new MIT companies navigate critical sales strategy and execution challenges. His success with early-stage ventures and enterprise sales is uniquely suited to the needs of start-ups and scale-up ventures.

 

Please register here: https://bit.ly/3oWaLpD

 

MIT VMS IAP UX Boot Camp: Defining the Problem Statement, User Experience Research and Journey Mapping
Jan/13 Thu 05:30PM–07:30PM

Presented by Karen Donoghue and Craig Newell

Register here: https://bit.ly/3m5JLCg

 

You’re an early-stage founder with a new product concept, or you are thinking of developing a new product. To realize your idea with the least amount of risk, you should validate the product idea before building it. This involves designing a prototype and gathering customer feedback to fine-tune the product, validating your assumptions about the benefits of your product and to whom your offering is delivering value.

User experience exists at the intersection of the needs of end-users, business needs, technology capabilities and engineering realities - and is a continual balancing act between all of these constraints. Your product’s user experience should function like a well-oiled machine, driving user behavior that enables your business model to flourish. Conversely, a poor user experience damages customers’ perception of your product and can grind your business model to a halt. 

This 2-hour UX Bootcamp presented by MIT VMS assumes little or no prior technical or UX experience and provides concrete recommendations on designing, validating and de-risking new software product concepts. 

 

Topics covered:

  • User experience in the context of envisioning new products
  • How to develop a great Problem Statement
  • Personas and User Research: how to build knowledge about end-users of your product to create the right solution for the right customer
  • Journey mapping: understand your end users’ journey with your product to deliver the right experience

 

About the Presenters:

Karen Donoghue (MS MIT Media Lab) is a practicing product designer with many years of experience delivering successful projects for startups and corporate clients. Karen founded and runs HumanLogic, a user experience consultancy. She is a former Principal UX Designer at Microsoft and a Senior UI Design Manager/Architect at Motorola, where she worked on designing the enabling software platform and UI framework for the Razr2 cell phone. Karen has been holding UX Expert Office Hours at MIT VMS and advising VMS entrepreneurs since 2011.

Craig Newell is the former Chief Architect for Mobile at VMware and a Principal at HumanLogic. Craig co-founded and was Chief Architect at SavaJe Technologies, a VC-backed mobile device platform startup in Boston acquired by Sun Microsystems.

Together, Karen and Craig launched Local Haze, an iPhone app that crowdsources air quality sensor data for over 29,000 sensors across six continents. In 2021, Karen and Craig co-authored the book “Envision Product User Experience for Founders”.

 

This bootcamp is designed for MIT IAP participants, VMS entrepreneurs, early-stage founders and teams and grad and undergrad students who are learning about becoming entrepreneurs – but all are welcome to join.

Please register here: https://bit.ly/3m5JLCg

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–02:30PM

The Study of Wave Interactions: Where Beautiful Mathematical Ideas Come Together

Abstract: Phenomena involving interactions of waves happen at different scales and in different media: from gravitational waves to the waves on the surface of the ocean, from our milk and coffee in the morning to infinitesimal particles that behave like wave packets in quantum physics. These phenomena are difficult to study in a rigorous mathematical manner, but maybe because of this challenge mathematicians have developed interdisciplinary approaches that are powerful and beautiful. I will describe some of these approaches and show for example how the need to understand certain multilinear and periodic interactions gave also the tools to prove a famous conjecture in number theory, or how classical tools in probability gave the right framework to still have viable theories behind certain deterministic counterexamples.

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

What is a random surface?

These constructions have deep roots in mathematics, drawing from classical graph theory (Tutte, Mullin), complex analysis (Gauss, Liouville, Riemann, Loewner), representation theory (Lie, Virasoro, Verma, Kac) and many areas of physics (string theory, Coulomb gas theory, quantum field theory, statistical mechanics, discrete quantum gravity).

We present here an informal, colloquium-level overview of the subject. We aim to answer, as cleanly as possible, the fundamental question. What is a random surface?

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:30PM

Minimal Mathematical Models of Living Matter

Recent advances in the live-imaging of multicellular systems pose a wide range of interesting mathematical problems, from the compression of video microscopy data to the modeling of gene expression, tissue dynamics and growth during embryonic development. After a brief review of recent experiments, we will introduce and analyze minimal ODE, SDE and PDE models to describe individual and collective cell behaviors.

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

Factoring Huge Integers

You learned many years ago that any integer N can be factored uniquely into primes.  But the algorithm taught in elementary school -- iterate through primes and check whether N is divisible by each one -- quickly becomes impractical when N gets large.  Computational number theorists have devised faster methods over the last several decades that make it possible to factor larger integers on a computer, but the problem is still very difficult: the 260 digit RSA-challenge factorization has stood for 30 years.  I will give a broad overview of the methods in use today, together with a more detailed description of three: the Miller-Rabin primality test, the quadratic sieve factoring algorithm and the elliptic curve factorization method.

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–02:30PM

The Odd-Town Theorem

We will discuss the so-called "Odd-Town Theorem", a theorem in extremal combinatorics (or, more specifically, in extremal set theory). Perhaps surprisingly, the proof of this combinatorics theorem relies on linear algebra over the finite field F_2. We will introduce F_2 in the lecture, and discuss the relevant concepts from linear algebra. Using these linear algebra concepts, we will then prove the "Odd-Town Theorem".

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–02:30PM

Fluidic Shaping of Optical Components

Fabrication of optical components, such as lenses and mirrors, has not changed considerably in the past 300 years, and it relies on mechanical processing such as grinding, machining, and polishing. These fabrication processes are complex and require specialized equipment that prohibits rapid prototyping of optics, and puts a very high price tag on large lenses and freeform designs.

In this talk I will present a novel approach that leverages the basic physics of interfacial phenomena for rapidly fabricating a variety of lenses and freeform optical components without the need for any mechanical processing. We will see how such components can be obtained in liquid form, by minimizing the free energy functional of the system, allowing to design various freeform optical topographies.

Lastly, I will discuss our collaboration with NASA on the use of this technology of in-space fabrication of optics and for the creation of large space telescopes that overcomes launch constraints. 

Mathematics Lecture Series
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

Surface Tension

 Surface tension is a property of fluid interfaces that leads to myriad subtle and striking effects in nature and technology. We describe a number of surface-tension-dominated systems and how to rationalize their behavior via mathematical modeling. Particular  attention is given to the role of surface tension in biological systems and in hydrodynamic  quantum analogs.

Mathematics of Big Data & Machine Learning
Jan/04 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM
Jan/10 Mon 05:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM
Jan/14 Fri 05:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM
Jan/24 Mon 05:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM

Enrollment: Limited: Advance sign-up required Limited to 35 participants

Attendance: Participants must attend all sessions

Prereq: Matrix Mathematics

Big Data describes a new era in the digital age where the volume, velocity, and variety of data created across a wide range of fields is increasing at a rate well beyond our ability to analyze the data.  Machine Learning has emerged as a powerful tool for transforming this data into usable information.  Many technologies (e.g., spreadsheets, databases, graphs, matrices, deep neural networks, ...) have been developed to address these challenges.  The common theme amongst these technologies is the need to store and operate on data as tabular collections instead of as individual data elements.  This class describes the common mathematical foundation of these tabular collections (associative arrays) that apply across a wide range of applications and technologies.  Associative arrays unify and simplify Big Data and Machine Learning.  Understanding these mathematical foundations allows the student to see past the differences that lie on the surface of Big Data and Machine Learning applications and technologies and leverage their core mathematical similarities to solve the hardest Big Data and Machine Learning challenges.

This interactive course will involve significant interactive student participation and a small amount of homework.   Those students who fully participate and complete the homework will receive a certificate of completion.

The MIT Press book "Mathematics of Big Data" that will be used throughout the course will be provided.

E-mail the instructor to sign up.

 

Instructors:

Jeremy Kepner - Fellow & Head MIT Supercomputing Center - kepner@ll.mit.edu

Hayden Jananthan - Post Doc MIT Supercomputing Center - hayden.jananthan@ll.mit.edu

Signup Deadline: Dec 15

Dates:

Jan 04 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Course Intro and Chapter 1

Jan 10 Mon 05:00PM-06:00PM Virtual Chapters 2 & 4 Team Prep

Jan 11 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Chapters 2 & 4

Jan 14 Fri 05:00PM-06:00PM Virtual Chapters 5 & 6 Team Prep

Jan 18 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Chapters 5 & 6

Jan 24 Mon 05:00PM-06:00PM Virtual Chapters 7 & 8 Team Prep

Jan 25 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Chapters 7 & 8

Medical Interpreting Course
Jan/03 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/04 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/05 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/07 Fri 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/10 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/17 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM

ActLingual and the Prehealth Advising Office are teaming up to offer a medical interpreting training this IAP through the University of Massachusetts Medical School! There are some very important details below so please read carefully if you are still interested in signing up:

  • Weekly classes are planned to be from Monday to Thursday starting on January 3rd- January 26 (with MLK day off). The classes will be completely virtual and at night from 6pm to 9pm. Two nights a week are dedicated to anatomy and physiology and two nights a week are dedicated to interpreter skills.
  • All languages are welcome for this course, as there will be no specific language coaching, so you should already have a good grasp on your target language.
  • Certificates will be given to students to show completion of 40 hours of interpreting training.
  • Students will need to pay $200 and non-students will pay $400 for this course. Please bring a check made out to CAPD to E-17-294

Please fill out this form if you are interested!

Mycotecture, BioHab, MycoHab and Regenerative Food, Medicine, Materials: A surprisingly digital (r)evolution in agriculture and construction
Jan/28 Fri 12:15PM–03:00PM

Online only with interactive live video of mycotecture techniques.

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, hosts key doers in the mycotecture regenerative agriculture and construction materials industries in a series of short presentations and panel Q&A followed by hands-on, live and interactive demonstration of mycotecture techniques by Chris Maurer, via video link to redhouse studios in Cleveland, OH.

Using the exemplar of the BioHab, a joint MIT-SBG-redhouse project currently being deployed in Namibia, architect and founder of redhouse studio Chris Maurer will explain working mycelium methods to reform agriwaste leveraging inflatables to create superior new “bioterials”, self-reproducing buildings, edible and medicinal mushrooms all in one process. Carolyn Cameron-Kirksmith, head of Group Strategic Development of Standard Bank Group and BioHAB will cover Africa’s largest bank continued investment in mco-R&D as well as entrepreneurial deployment directly to market after establishing growing mushrooms operations at BioHab Namibia. We will cover blockchain technologies aiming at accurately tracking product quality and provenance and discuss monetizing carbon sequestration and land stewardship. 

Zoom linkhttps://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148

Links to additional materials:
www.bio-hab.org
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L0EgAVwZbM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG5fe7AfaPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9ovt4QaprE&t=422s

No Self, No Problem: A Zen Conversation
Jan/24 Mon 08:00PM–09:00PM

Rev. Takafumi Kawakami, Vice-Abbot, Shunkou-in, Kyoto, Japan.

Nuts and Bolts of New Ventures - Not For Credit Version
Jan/18 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM

Nuts and Bolts of New Ventures is offered for credit as 15.393.   It is also open to others on a Not for Credit basis.   

This 6 evening session course (6pm-9pm) will be held the last 2 weeks in January: Tues, Wed, Thurs January 18, 19, 20, 25, 26 and 27, 2022.  This will be the 33nd Annual Offering of the course, which has been ranked by INC Magazine as one of the 10 Best Entrepreneurship Courses in America.   Nuts and Bolts is the largest entrepreneurship class taught at MIT and the oldest ongoing IAP offering on new ventures. Taught by serial entrepreneurs who are actively involved in entrepreneurial ventures.  Typical attendance is 150 to 200.  A great place to find new ventures and meet team members.

Take the course for 6 units of credit (Pass/Fail) or just attend as a listener. Listeners must sign up on the email list at nutsandbolts.mit.edu/email.php

Patent (and Other) Protection Available for Artificial Intelligence (AI) Related Inventions
Jan/07 Fri 01:30PM–03:00PM

Join Ben and Dan of the MIT TLO to learn about Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the challenges and alternatives to patenting AI. They will also walk you though examples of AI patents and helps answer the question of "Who is the Inventor?"

 

Ben joined MIT’s Technology Licensing Office as their TLO for Medical Devices 7 years ago following a 30-year career leading product development teams bringing to market new technologies in electronic imaging, medical devices, life sciences instrumentation, and drug development.  His experience spans both large companies and medical device/therapeutic startups.  He holds a B.A. in physics from Carleton College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Cornell University.

Daniel Dardani is a Technology Licensing Officer at the MIT TLO with 18 years of experience managing a large and sophisticated portfolio of computer and software technologies including algorithms, digital imaging, video games, machine learning/AI, and cybertech innovations. Dan has negotiated countless license agreements with companies large and small. Dan is a Certified Licensing ProfessionalTM; is a teaching fellow at Harvard University’s Summer School, and is quick to lend his expertise serving on professional committees and advisory boards in the areas of software, licensing, and intellectual property.

Postponed, new date TBD -- New Positions, New Perspectives
Jan/13 Thu 03:00PM–05:00PM

Professors Olivia Corradin, Yadira Soto-Feliciano, Sinisa Hrvatin, Kristin Knouse, Hernandez Moura Silva, Sara Prescott, Francisco J. Sánchez-Rivera, Alison Ringel, and Harikesh Wong

New faculty members joining the Biology Department this year bring with them fresh perspectives on their scientific journeys, strategies for pursuing an academic career, and visions for the scientific community. Join us for a discussion of their bold ideas and followed by a facilitated reception to get to know them individually.

Session organizers: Eliezer Calo, Aditi Shukla, Alice Herneisen

Thursday, January 13th, 3:00–5:00 PM, 68-180/181

Practical High Performance Computing: Scaling Beyond your Laptop
Jan/11 Tue 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:00AM–12:00PM

The focus of this workshop is to introduce the role of High Performance Computing in research. Learn how to scale your application to run on HPC Systems available to the MIT Community.

Description
The focus of this workshop is to introduce the role of High Performance Computing (HPC, aka supercomputing) in research. We will discuss the fields where HPC is used and provide concrete examples where we describe the strategies used to scale applications to hundreds of processors. Students will learn when to scale from their laptops to HPC, what challenges that introduces, and how to address those challenges with efficient HPC workflows. The MIT SuperCloud will be used for hands-on examples using C/C++, Julia, Matlab, and/or Python. We will also demonstrate applications using other computing resources on campus, such as the Satori and Engaging clusters. Students should bring an existing research problem/application that they would like to scale as a project.

This is a blended course with asynchronous and live components. Much of the lecture will be available before class in pre-recorded short videos and class time will be spent on hands-on activities and student research project work. Students taking the class for MIT credit are required to complete a short report on their project.

Students looking to take this class for credit should sign up for 12.091/12.S593. Those interested in taking the class not for credit can send email to lauren.milechin@mit.edu.

Prerequisites
Working knowledge of one programming/scripting language. Laptop for hands-on exercises. Participants will get further instruction on how to access MIT Supercloud once registered for the class. Students should bring an existing research problem/application that they would like to scale as a project.

Radically Rethinking Entrepreneurship: How product diseases kill startups and what to do instead
Jan/18 Tue 06:30PM–08:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 06:30PM–08:30PM

This virtual 2-session seminar challenges conventional wisdom that the key to entrepreneurship is to iterate quickly, fail-fast-learn-fast, and pivot till you find product-market fit. For every company that found success by over relying on iteration, there’s a vast graveyard of startups that died after catching product diseases. It’s taught by experienced entrepreneur and MIT alumna, Radhika Dutt, who has participated in 4 exits and is the author of Radical Product Thinking: The New Mindset for Innovating Smarter. In the span of 2 workshops you’ll engage in hands-on exercises and learn how you can build successful products in a repeatable manner. You’ll also learn how you can embrace the responsibility that comes with this superpower so you can avoid creating digital pollution as you build world-changing products. This IAP course serves as a preview to the Experimental Study Group's  spring 2022 seminar, ES.S70.

To participate in this workshop, please send email to rdutt@alum.mit.edu and request the zoom link, which will be sent to you the day before the first session.

Reconstructing Religion: Can Religious Faith Contribute to the Public Good? Should it have a Place in the Public Square?
Jan/25 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

How did the church get to the point where Christianity as a tradition and Christians, in particular, are often looked at with derision and as an anchor around the neck of society rather than a cool breeze blowing into its sails? Is there a way to imagine religion (specifically Christianity) that promotes human flourishing and strengthens our Democratic Tradition? Is there a place for the faith in the public square and what contributions can it make, if any? Or is it no longer needed?

Dr. Ron Sanders - Affiliate Assistant Professor in Ethics. He holds a Ph.D. in Theology and Christian Ethics from Fuller Theological Seminary, an M.A. in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics from Biola University.

Restorative Justice: ICEO Community Dialogues
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM
Transforming Communities, Classrooms and Conflict
 
Restorative justice challenges us to hold ourselves and our communities accountable to cultivating and maintaining the relationships and systems that deeply center our humanity and align with our core values. How can restorative practices be used to not only address interpersonal harm but transform the ways in which we live, work and learn together in service of a more just and equitable society?
 
In this interactive presentation and discussion, participants will be introduced to the indigenous origins and core tenants of restorative justice; its contemporary practices and applications on college campuses, and how it can help us realize our vision for equity, inclusion and belonging. 
 
The session will be led by Nina Harris, Restorative Resolutions Coordinator (Institute Discrimination Harassment & Response).
 
SOLD OUT IAP COURSE - HANDLING NEGATIVITY
Jan/06 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Suppose we are trapped in a cell with a cellmate who constantly draws our attention to the many terrible images on the cell walls. While we may try to replace those images, we also need to deal with the cellmate effectively.

 

Similarly, our mind often highlights our negative memories in our inner world. While we may try to replace those memories, we also need to deal with the mind effectively to maintain our positivity or even our sanity.

Join us to know the techniques from ancient Vedic wisdom to make your inner world bright and right so that you make the best choices in your outer world for gaining worthwhile achievement materially and eternal fulfillment spiritually.

 

The workshop series will be a guided process of reflection and discovery to capture and transfigure your unique story. 

To apply, click here

Please submit your application by 11:59 pm on Friday, December 31st, 2022

Science and Faith - friends of foes? (Part 2) - Can a Scientist Believe in the Miracles of Jesus?
Jan/13 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

How do we reconcile miracles with our modern, scientific understanding of nature? Is it reasonable for any thinking person to accept them as true? Do the miraculous claims of Christianity, like the miracles of Jesus, hold up under scrutiny, and what do they mean for us?

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Science and Faith - friends or foes? (Part 1) - Is there Evidence for God in the Universe? Do the Laws of Nature Point to God or lead us away from the idea of a God?
Jan/11 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many people have difficulty reconciling modern science with the Christian faith(as well as other faith traditions) - especially the Biblical account of cosmology and the origins of the universe. The fundamental laws of nature in our universe appear to be "fine-tuned" to allow for intelligent life. In this talk, we'll dive into modern scientific discovery and explore possible explanations for this phenomenon and speculate on the possible role of a designer.

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Science and Society Seminars: A Field Guide to Values in Science for Biologists
Jan/13 Thu 01:30PM

Hosted by Biology DEI Officer Hallie Dowling-Huppert and the Graduate Committee.

Security Studies Program - IAP: Contemporary Military Topics: "Navy/USMC Overview: The Surface Navy-path and roles of Surface Warfare and USMC Force Design 2030 and Concept for Stand-in Forces"
Jan/20 Thu 01:30PM–03:00PM

 The USMC focus will be on "Force Design 2030 and the USMC Concept for Stand-in Forces."  This will highlight our (USMC) force structure/force design changes inline with the Joint Warfighting Concept and how the USMC will facilitate the role of Stand-in Forces in the Pacific theater of operation.

Security Studies Program - IAP: Contemporary Military Topics: Strategic Reality & Tactical Mirages: Special Operations & The Iranian Hostage Rescue, 1979-1980
Jan/18 Tue 12:00PM–01:30PM

The Iranian hostage rescue attempt––dubbed Operation Eagle Claw––is an often-cited but less understood mission that contributed to the creation of United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) in 1987. Using Graham Allison and Philip Zelikow’s Models of decision making from their work Essence of Decision, the thesis explores alternative explanations on why the rescue mission failed using the Organizational Behavior and Government Politics Models of decision making. After further scrutiny, the Government Politics Model reveals an asymmetric need for OPSEC by President Carter’s National Security Advisor. The desire for secrecy resulted in organizational imperatives by the military that ultimately limited preparation for the audacious mission. As SOF continues to provide presidential administrations options in opaque political environments, like Eagle Claw, senior leaders––both soldier and statesman––must recognize the tension between the growth of SOF quantity to meet increasing strategic demand and the attrition of SOF quality by organizational imperatives. The management of this dilemma will characterize the future of SOF.  During this talk, I will share several critical elements of my career that led to my interest in the thesis and some operational vignettes from my time in Command of SOF aviation Combat Units

Security Studies Program - IAP: Contemporary Military Topics: “The Future of Army Space "
Jan/12 Wed 12:00PM–01:30PM

“The Future of Army Space "

With the Space Force establishment in 2019, what are the impacts on the Army Space Program and its future?

Seminar: Innovation and Social Justice
Jan/12 Wed 11:00AM–12:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 11:00AM–12:30PM
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:30PM

Whether you are seeking inspiration or already committed to making the world better and just, this series will give you indispensable insights and the tools you need. It draws from the speaker’s experience at the frontline, and from philosophy, history and sociology to address the nature of justice, injustice and paths to justice.

Manish Bhardwaj is a Fellow of the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values. He is the James Wei Visiting Professor at the Keller Center at Princeton where he teaches idealism, and entrepreneurship in the service of justice. He is the co-founder of Innovators In Health (IIH) which delivers healthcare to the rural poor in India. IIH works through accompaniment, addressing the particular barriers of a particular person in a particular place. Over the past 11 years, IIH has served more than 100,000 patients. Partnering with more than 800 female community healthcare workers, the organization has doubled access to TB treatment, and cut neonatal mortality by more than a third. Manish has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Software Radio
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM

Learn about software defined radio using GNU Radio during this interactive course.

Software-defined radio (SDR) technology is having a tremendous impact not only in consumer devices but also in the areas of rapid prototyping and research and development. MIT Lincoln Laboratory is offering a course to introduce students to SDR fundamentals and applications. Students will gain hands-on experience with the USRP SDR platform and GNU Radio toolkit, while learning theory and practice of digital signal processing and digital communications. The course will consist of several projects, such as FM radio receivers, digital video transmission and reception, and spectrum sensing, highlighting the flexibility of software radios.

Gain hands-on experience with popular software radio platforms (USRP, HackRF, RTL-SDR,…)
• Learn theory and practice of digital signal processing and digital communications
• Projects include
– FM radio receiver
– Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) receiver
– Spectrum sensing / signal detection
– GPS receiver
– Digital modulation

Starr Forum: The Russian-Ukrainian Conflict: A prologue to WWIII or another frozen conflict?
Jan/28 Fri 10:30AM–11:30AM

Please register for this Zoom event at https://bit.ly/Russian-UkrainianConflict

Featuring:

Dmitry Gorenburg is a senior research scientist at CNA, where he has worked since 2000. Dr. Gorenburg is an associate at the Harvard University Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His research interests include security issues in the former Soviet Union, Russian military reform, Russian foreign policy, and ethnic politics and identity.

Olga Oliker is the program director for Europe and Central Asia at the International Crisis Group. Her research interests include foreign and security policies of Russia, Ukraine, and the Central Asian and Caucasian successor states to the Soviet Union, domestic politics in these countries, US policy towards the region, and nuclear weapon strategy and arms control. She received her PhD from the MIT Department of Political Science.

Serhii Plokhii is the Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History and director of the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University.  His research interests include the intellectual, cultural, and international history of Eastern Europe, with an emphasis on Ukraine.

Carol Saivetz is a senior advisor in the MIT Security Studies Program. She is a research associate at Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Dr Saivetz is the author and contributing co-editor of books and articles on Soviet and now Russian foreign policy issues, including an assessment of the “reset,” Russian policies toward the other Soviet successor states, and current US-Russian relations.

Elizabeth Wood is professor of history at MIT. She is the author most recently of Roots of Russia’s War in Ukraine (Woodrow Wilson Center and Columbia University Press, 2016). She is co-director of the MIT Russia Program, coordinator of Russian studies, and adviser to the Russian Language Program. 

 

A session of the Focus on Russia Lecture Series.

Co-sponsors:  MIT Center for International Studies (CIS), MIT Security Studies Program (SSP), MISTI MIT-Russia

 

Event Poster

View Poster | Watch Video | View Transcript

Free & open to the public 
Also watch it on YouTube.

MIT is committed to providing an environment that is accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you need a disability related accommodation to attend or have other questions, please contact us at starrforum@mit.edu.

Sign up for Starr Forum emails to get notified about upcoming events.

A full listing of Starr Forums is available here

Staying at the Bench: Non-PI Careers that Keep You Doing the Work You Love
Jan/04 Tue 12:30PM–02:00PM

Boryana (Bory) Petrova, PhD, Instructor,Harvard Medical School

Stuart Levine, PhD, Director,BioMicro Center, MIT

Christina Steadman, PhD, Staff Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory

What if I want to keep doing science? Many post-PhD careers take trained scientists away from the bench, but that need not be the case. Hear about the perspectives and trajectories of three “staff scientists”—some of whom conducted postdoctoral research at MIT—and how their work overlaps and diverges from that of a PI at an academic institution.

Session organizers: Dylan McCormick and Alice Herneisen

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/96695361761

Password: MITBiology

Staying at the Bench: Non-PI Careers that Keep You Doing the Work You Love
Jan/14 Fri 12:30PM–02:00PM

Boryana (Bory) Petrova, PhD, Instructor,Harvard Medical School

Stuart Levine, PhD, Director,BioMicro Center, MIT

Christina Steadman, PhD, Staff Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory

What if I want to keep doing science? Many post-PhD careers take trained scientists away from the bench, but that need not be the case. Hear about the perspectives and trajectories of three “staff scientists”—some of whom conducted postdoctoral research at MIT—and how their work overlaps and diverges from that of a PI at an academic institution.

Session organizers: Dylan McCormick and Alice Herneisen

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/96695361761

Password: MITBiology

Stretch Your Impact - Using Social Media for Good
Jan/27 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join the PKG Center for our last “Stretch Your Impact” session of IAP. 

For this season finale, we are thrilled to be joined by Pabel Martinez and Adán Chávez. Currently, Pabel serves as Founder and CEO of Plurawl and Global Account Director at Tik Tok. Adán is U.S. Politics and Global Outreach Manager for Meta, previously know as Facebook.

Learn more about our speakers here. 

On Zoom - RSVP to get link.

Stretch Your Impact - faculty talk with Ben Armstrong
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join the MIT PKG Center in conversation with Ben Armstrong, Interim Executive Director and a Research Scientist at MIT’s Industrial Performance Center. His research and teaching examine how workers, firms, and regions adapt to technological change. His current projects include a national plan for the U.S. manufacturing workforce in partnership with the Department of Defense, as well as a policy playbook developing lessons for struggling regional economies in the United States.

In his work, Ben has collaborated with governments, non-profit organizations, and firms to understand how scholarship and education can be useful to practitioners and policymakers. Ben completed his undergraduate degree at Northwestern University and his PhD at MIT. Before graduate school, he helped lead an open-source hardware non-profit and worked at Google Inc.

Want to learn more about Ben’s work? Check out this Forbes article featuring his work. 

On Zoom - RSVP to get Zoom link 

Wednesday, January 19th, at 12 PM

​ 

Sustainability and Climate Change
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM–04:00PM

Operations Research Center IAP Seminar 2022Operations Research is a powerful area for applications involving energy process design, waste minimization, climate change mitigation, scarce resources management, and other problems related to creating more sustainable and environmentally responsible operations. In this seminar, we will engage with a wide range of researchers and practitioners tackling these and other topics via data science, optimization, and other contemporary OR methods.

Techno-Inquiry Reading Group
Jan/04 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM

With this reading group, we aim at slowing down and promote critical reflection over the work we do everyday. We will do this by investigating, together, questions surrounding power dynamics within scientific knowledge, feminist views over politics and matters of situated knowledge, and the ethics animating the construct of technology as we know it. Our goal is to collectively reflect on some of these concepts and ground them in our own practice

You can learn more about the reading group here: https://bit.ly/techno-inquiry

Sign up filling out this incredibly short form: https://forms.gle/UNrXqvfqKxJDP2xr5

Technology Transfer at Lincoln Laboratory
Jan/12 Wed 11:30AM–01:00PM

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is a Federally Funded Research and Development Center, run by MIT to develop advanced technology in support of national security. For close to 70 years, the Lincoln Laboratory has been developing critical technologies in areas as diverse as radar systems, satellite platforms and payloads, artificial intelligence, quantum information sciences, and synthetic biology, to name a few.
 
Historically, the Laboratory builds prototypes and transitions that know-how to government sponsors and their industry contractors. For technologies that may also be useful to the civilian sector (so called dual-use), commercialization and open-source distribution are pathways for knowledge sharing. But how and to whom to transfer technologies is not always obvious and engineers are seldom trained as entrepreneurs. 
 
Join Lou Bellaire, Deputy Technology Ventures Officer at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, as he discusses the factors that influence technology transfer from a national laboratory perspective. She is equally interested in your ideas on how to ensure that federally funded research supports economic gains and social well-being on a grand scale.

The Engine: How we Support "Tough Tech" Startups and Make Investment Decisions
Jan/05 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

The Engine, built by MIT, is a venture capital firm that invests into "Tough Tech" companies and that provides a variety of services and facilities to those companies and to the greater "tough tech" ecosystem.  This session will cover our approach to investments and how we support companies.

Reed is a General Partner on the investment team at The Engine. He serves as a Board Member for Celestial AI, Hyperlight, Rise Robotics, C2Sense, The Routing Company, Cambridge Electronics, and Emvolon.  Reed was a founder and Managing Director at Project 11 Ventures and Techstars Boston. He attended MIT and has a background in software. He ran Microsoft Startup Labs in Cambridge and was VP of Technology at Idealab, Boston. Early in his career he created Freelance Graphics which was acquired by Lotus Development Corp. He has been a lecturer at MIT Sloan and is a frequent speaker at MIT entrepreneurship courses and programs.

The Future is Flexible: MLK Scholar Kristen Dorsey
Jan/27 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

MLK Visiting Scholar Kristen Dorsey talks about developments in soft mechanical sensors, 3D printed textiles, and more; the need for culture change in academic to support a more diverse generation of engineers.

The Market for Ideas
Jan/28 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM

Product Innovation and invention surges ahead at rates unimaginable just a few decades ago. With good reason inventors protect their intellectual property (IP) internationally with a variety of tools - patents, copyright, and trademarks. 

But how should an inventor monetize the invention? Form and build a startup? Sell the invention? License it? Utilize Open-Source?

The speakers will examine the basics of patents, copyright, and trademark and consider monetization – entrepreneurship by building a startup, outright sale, and out-licensing – as well as factors and recent trends affecting patent valuation. The presentation is based on decades of worldwide SVP, Director, and entrepreneurial experience in product development and intellectual property at Intellectual Ventures, Oracle, Alcatel, Texas Instruments, Sun Microsystems, private law firms, and startups.

Leading the discussion:

Everardo Ruiz, Ph.D. , SM ‘00 (Managing Director, Energy Transition Partners)

Sanjay Prasad, J.D. (Managing Director, Energy Transition Partners)

This event is in person and space is limited. Registration is available via Eventbrite

UNBOXING RELIGION: Christian History: A Quick Trip Through 2,000 Years
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–03:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Christian History: A Quick Trip Through 2,000 Years

Fr. Michael Medas (Catholic Chaplain), Pastor Andrew Heisen (Lutheran Chaplain) and Deacon James Wilcox (Saint Mary Orthodox Church, Cambridge)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Jews and Judaism 101
Jan/26 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

 

Jews and Judaism 101

Rabbi Menachem Altein (Jewish Chaplain, Chabad)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: The Bahá’í Faith
Jan/27 Thu 07:00PM–08:30PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

The Bahá’í Faith

Brian Aull (Bahá’í Chaplain)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Understanding Hinduism
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–03:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Understanding Hinduism

Swami Tyagananda (Hindu Chaplain)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Understanding Islam and Muslims
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–05:30PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Understanding Islam and Muslims

Sister Nada El-Alami (Muslim Chaplain)

Registration Link

(also offered: Thurs. 1/13 12:00-1:30 and Tues. 1/18 2:00-3:30)

Using Search Tools for Market Research
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–02:30PM

When conducting research related to intellectual property, especially in the areas of patents and market research, there are some tools that you should keep in mind. 
In this session, Nick Albaugh, Management and Social Sciences Librarian for Innovation & Entrepreneurship from MIT Libraries, will explain the best tools to use as well as share more about:

  • How to conduct a preliminary patent search using subscription-based and freely available tools
  • How to find the most relevant market research using specialized resources
  • How patent searching can inform market research and vice versa
Using Your PhD to Combat Climate Change
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–03:30PM

 

Dr. Rachel Fraser, PhD, Impossible Foods, Vice President of Downstream Process Development

Dr. Hélène Berges, PhD, Inari Agriculture, Vice President of Research and Development

The climate crisis has galvanized scientists to pursue bold ideas to both reduce carbon emissions, as well as adapt to a changing environment. Join us for a moderated Q&A to discover how we, as biologists, can leverage the skills that we have acquired to pursue industry research positions that are focused on sustainability. We will be speaking to Dr. Rachel Fraser, the Vice President of Downstream Process Development at Impossible Foods, a company focused on developing plant-based meat substitutes, and Dr. Hélène Berges, Vice President of Research and Development at Inari Agriculture, a company harnessing AI and multiplexed gene editing to produce robust seeds for food production.

Session organizers: Alex Chan and Aditi Shukla

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98725240323

Password: MITBiology

iGEM Infosession
Jan/11 Tue 07:00PM

A ~1 hour info session about iGEM and how MIT students can get involved for the 2022 season. Learn more at https://biomakers.mit.edu/igem/ or email ellief@mit.edu and angao@mit.edu