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"Grad Unified Theory" participates in the MIT Mystery Hunt
Jan/14 Fri 12:00PM

Are you interested in participating in the 2022 MIT Mystery Hunt (January 14, 2022 — January 17, 2022), but don’t currently have a team?  Ashdown House is hosting a team for this hunt, called “Grad Unified Theory”.  This Mystery Hunt will be held remotely, so people can puzzle from anywhere in the world.  (If you’re interested in learning more about Mystery Hunt in general, be sure to check out the official website: https://www.mitmh2022.com/)

For “Grad Unified Theory”, we will be (tentatively) having in-person puzzling in Ashdown House, as well as supporting remote puzzling through Discord and a collaboration server.  Sign up for the “Grad Unified Theory” team here: https://forms.gle/eMFkLq6yq9kbkjn79

(If you want to join a different team, sign up here as an unattached solver, and the Mystery Hunt admins can work with you to be added to a team: https://www.mitmh2022.com/register/solver.)

Aren't We Better Off Without Christianity?
Jan/20 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

40 years ago, sociologists believed that as the world became more modern, more educated, and more scientific, religious belief would naturally decline. Many western intellectuals thought this was both inevitable and desirable: religion would not survive in the modern world, and we modern people would be better off without it. Doesn't Christianity hinder our pursuits of modern values? What is our reality today? Is Christianity positive or negative for individuals and society? And what shapes how we determine what makes us “better off”?

Dr. REBECCA McLAUGHLIN, Ph.D. in English literature from Cambridge University, Theology degree from Oak Hill College in London. Speaker, Writer, and author of Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion. Find out more about Rebecca at www.rebeccamclaughlin.org.

BUILDING WORLDS WITH SPECULATIVE AND SCIENCE FICTION
Jan/05 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

***Registration for this activity is now closed***

 

Reading short works of speculative and science fiction, especially by authors writing from outside the US, participants in this activity will consider how worlds are imagined and textually rendered. Particular emphasis will be placed on thinking about how this fiction might help us remake our own worlds in the face of planetary climate change and persisting structural inequalities on bases of race, ethnicity, class, caste, gender, and sexuality.

This 4-session virtual activity will meet on the four Wednesdays in January (5th, 12th, 19th, and 26th) from 3:00-4:00pm EDT. It will be facilitated by History, Anthropology, & STS PhD students Hina Walajahi and Zach La Rock. Participants will receive electronic copies of all readings in advance. Those who register for the activity may attend individual sessions but are warmly invited to all of them.

 

Sponsored by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society and the Department of Anthropology.

 

Limited enrollment: advance sign up required, sign-up deadline is 03 January 2022.

Participants are welcome to attend individual sessions

 

CANCELED: IAP - LCE Language Conversation Cafe
Jan/20 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM

Join us to meet other language enthusiasts, language learners, and native speakers of languages you’d like to practice. This is a great way to find a language partner! We are going to play games in different languages. 

Brought to you by the Language Conversation Exchange. Our program is open to MIT community members only.

Chemical Engineering Chocolate Experiment 
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM
Join ChemE on a chocolate adventure where you can learn all about how chocolate is made and experiment with the properties of chocolate and how it relates to taste and texture. This virtual hands-on experience is open to first years only! 
 
Delicious chocolates will be delivered to you – ChemE flavored! 
Make sure to RSVP to claim your chocolate and your seat: https://forms.gle/2ifxk5ScyL3N5sMs5
Date: Wednesday, January 19th 
Time: 1:00-2:00 PM
virtual event
 
Registration or event questions: Sharece Corner scorner3@mit.edu
Emergency Preparedness for Your Home
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:00PM

People and families that plan for emergencies will:

  • Help keep people safe;
  • Limit property damage;
  • Know what to do during and after a disaster;
  • Better manage their savings;
  • Support community preparedness; and
  • Help their community get back up and running after a disaster.

Taking simple actions to protect against disaster helps you, your family, your community, and your country in important ways.  This training will help guide you through the initial stages for developing your own resposne plans for your home and loved ones.

Eye on A.I.: Decoding the Bias
Jan/25 Tue 07:00PM–08:30PM

Sasha Costanza-Chock, Shalini Kantayya, Safiya Noble and Kishawna Peck speak with Ethan Zuckerman to discuss biases, equity, transparency, and governance as they  relate to machine learning.  

In the 2020 film Coded Bias, filmmaker Shalini Kantayya explores the fallout of MIT Media Lab researcher Joy Buolamwini’s discovery that facial recognition does not see dark-skinned faces accurately, and her journey to push for the first-ever legislation in the U.S. to govern against bias in the algorithms that impact us all.

In this panel discussion, leading experts working in the field of machine learning discuss the underlying prejudices embedded in computer code and how we might unravel these predispositions and ensure all humans are treated equally by both human and machine.  The discussion will focus on racial and gender biases in artificial intelligence (A.I.) and how it affects our day to day living. 

Registration is required.  

As a component of the program, we encourage participants to view Coded Bias.  The film is available to current MIT community members here; it is also available to members of the general public on Netflix.  

The MIT Libraries is committed to accessibility.  Please email us if you would like to request accommodation to participate in this program.  Please let us know as far in advance as possible and we will do our best to meet your request. 

This event is presented in collaboration with the Toronto Public Library and is part of TPL's On Civil Society series.

Genetown: Biotech's History in Kendall Square
Jan/25 Tue 01:30PM–03:30PM

Biotechnology and science are often thought of as abstract ideas, but where they take place has long lasting consequences for how innovation and invention occur. In the last forty years Kendall Square has become the epicenter of Boston's booming biotechnology sector. However, in 1978 conditions looked far less auspicious-- Kendall Square was in industrial decline and the development of biotechnology faced strenuous local opposition. The rise of the biotechnology industry required not only new ideas but new ways of financing companies, recruiting scientists, and developing real estate. By moving through Kendall Square and MIT, we will view some of the sites where biotech history was made, explore the ingredients of Kendall Square's success, and whether it can continue. Time includes an outdoor Q&A around a fire.

 

Sponsored by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society

 

Limited enrollment: advance sign up required

Sign-up deadline: January 21; maximum number of participants: 20

 

Please use the below form to sign up

Genetown IAP Form

 

Hypocrisy: If Jesus Christ is so Good, Why is the Church so Bad?
Jan/18 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

In a recent survey at MIT, students were asked, “For you, what makes Christianity or God's existence difficult for you to believe?” The most picked answer was the hypocrisy they see in those who identify as Christian and the Church. There is no arguing that hypocrisy exists among Christians and the Church. Hypocrisy is a massive deterrent for people no matter who it comes from. If Christianity is supposed to make people better, then why associate with something that doesn’t really seem to work? Why accept it as true? How can it be worth considering when it seems like Christians don’t even follow its teachings?

LOU PHILLIPS, Traveling speaker with the Lighten Group, Theological studies at the OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS

IAP - Introduction to Total Scattering
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

Total scattering or pair distribution function analysis (PDF) is an analytical technique that provides structural information from disordered materials by using the complete powder XRD pattern (Bragg scattering from long-range order and diffuse scattering from local structure).  Typical materials can be amorphous, poorly crystalline, nano-crystalline or nano-structured. Examples of samples are:

Nanopowders
Glasses
Polymers
Pharmaceutical ingredients
Liquids

The Materials Research Laboratory has recently acquired a Mo X-ray source Panalytical Empyrean X-ray diffratometer capable of performing X-ray total scattering measurements. The new Empyrean has a 3kW Mo X-ray source with focusing optic, transmission capillary spinner stage with alignment camera, and Galipix 3D CdTe area detector (100% efficient for Mo radiation) that is optimized for rapid PDF measurements.

If you're interested in learning advanced X-ray scattering technqiues to get the most structural information from your non-ideal material system, feel free to attend the in-person session!

IAP 2022: Mission Innovation Program—Dual-use Ventures: Navigating Both Commercial & Defense Markets
Jan/19 Wed 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM–05:00PM

Program Description

The Dual-use Ventures non-credit IAP course helps technology startups navigate early-stage challenges in market research, use cases, and federal funding opportunities. We provide insights into navigating SBIRs, STTRs, and other federal funding opportunities while working within the commercial marketplace so that tech founders - when thoughtful and working rigorously - can take their Minimum Viable Product from $0 in revenue to $1,500,000 in defense contracts over the course of 24 months. This program is intentional about instruction and training - our eminent goal is to help MIT-affiliated lab-based tech startups traverse the trough of disillusionment and commercialize tough tech products for the betterment of humankind. 

This course is for students, alumni, and ecosystem members who want to learn useful and actionable steps to create dual-use ventures (DuV). A dual-use venture is one that has both government and commercial (enterprise and/or consumer) customers. We’ll discuss frameworks, funding opportunities, entrepreneur roadmaps, and government resources. Topics in this course are particularly relevant to technology entrepreneurs interested in learning more about working with the Department of Defense.

MIT strives to enable higher levels of diversity and inclusion in the innovation ecosystem. Research shows that diversity is a key factor for innovation, helping unearth inherent biases in technological solutions, enabling teams to make better decisions, and driving stronger performance. We strongly encourage members of traditionally marginalized communities to participate in this course.

This series offers presentations over zoom from MIT and government speakers, a networking event, and plenty of opportunities to ask questions on topics we have found tech startups are most interested in learning more about.

                                             REGISTER

Course Thesis

Startups can be purposeful about designing their company to be ready to pursue both commercial and defense markets. This requires being informed, prepared, diligent, and ready when either market opportunity becomes available.

Key Outcomes

  • Learn about non-dilutive funding opportunities, nuances of the defense and dual-use markets, and stakeholders in the defense acquisitions system
  • Understand the need to move opportunistically across both commercial and defense markets in the early stages of ventures
  • Learn how government data rights interact with a dual-use venture’s commercially oriented IP strategy
  • Gain insights on how to protect the long-term value of your technology for both commercial and government markets
  • Achieve an actionable understanding of DOD contractual requirements for cybersecurity and information protection

Schedule
(updated regularly & subject to change)

Day 1 | Wednesday, January 19, 2022 | Dual-use, broadly…

Day 2 | Thursday, January 20, 2022 | My tech startup has a call with the military…

 Day 3 | Friday, January 21, 2022 | Startup funding pinball…

 

                                             REGISTER

SPEAKERS

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part I)
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers better understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  tech? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current trends that may relate to changing how we write laws regulating new tech?

On the Crypto side, emphasis will be on the examples of NFTs in the music industry, and lessons learned on how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the legal framework of a value exchange system that is built on reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers to inclusivity without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states to emerging  technologies such as bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does ones freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand? These questions and others will be covered by:

  a panel group, including: hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- in Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part II)
Jan/28 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  fields? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current changing trends in  how we write tech laws?

On the Crypto side, we will present the exaple of NFTs in the music industry, asking how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the framework of a value exchange system that is built on inlcusivity, reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers -without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states (osmodata)  to emerging technologies such as  bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does one's freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand?

Andreas and Dimitri will be joined by a panel group, including, hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Isn't Religion Just a Psychological Delusion - Just Wishful Thinking to Comfort People?
Jan/27 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many today would say they do not want to believe in God, but that those who do are driven to do so as a kind of wish fulfillment.  This “You wish” argument against belief in God goes back to Voltaire, Diderot, Darwin, and Feuerbach.  And it was most popularized and sharpened by Freud. Freud referred to religion as “the universal obsessional neurosis of humanity,” and claimed that the spiritual worldview “distorts the picture of the real world in a delusional manner.” Dr. Brandon Unruh will help us examine these claims and critiques from his own lived experience and his professional experience as a clinician.

DR. BRANDON UNRUH, M.D - Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and clinician at McLean Hospital

MIT Bluewater Sailing Informational Session
Jan/20 Thu 07:00PM–08:00PM

MIT Sailing would love for you to join us aboard our museum quality 51' Herreshoff sailboat in Boston Harbor.  Bluewater Sailing is under the supervision of MIT Sailing and their volunteer instructors; the program operates in Boston Harbor on a bigger boat with more teamwork, longer trips and more immersion in the ocean.  This virtual informational session is for those who are new to big boat sailing at MIT and guide you through how to get a sailing card, sign up for a bluewater sail, and what to expect when you climb aboard.  The bluewater program is focused on increasing the exposure of the MIT community to big boat sailing.  For those with sailing experience who are interested in progressing their knowledge, racing, or leading sailing trips, we will discuss the process for earning a bluewater crew and skipper rating towards the end of the session. 

More information about the program and email list signup will be available at http://sailing.mit.edu/bluewater/ 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://mit.zoom.us/j/97839877502

MIT Bluewater Sailing: Cruising, Racing, and Relaxing
Jan/24 Mon 07:00PM–08:00PM

Want to learn more about bluewater sailing at MIT? Come hear stories about different adventures ranging from cruising to racing from Boston to Maine and beyond. 

 

More information about the program and email list signup will be available at http://sailing.mit.edu/bluewater/ 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://mit.zoom.us/j/97839877502

 

MIT Heavy Metal 101 IAP 2022
Jan/10 Mon 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM

Not a Metallurgy class! This veteran crash-course is coming back in full force and will have you head banging, air guitaring, and devil horn raising in no time! Learn everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal, including how Metallica tries too hard to be cool, why Lemmy IS God (RIP), how the genre tackles some of today's biggest sociopolitical challenges, why metal bands exist in every country on Earth, and why you're probably already a metalhead without even knowing it.  

WARNING: This series most definitely goes to 11!  Earplugs optional. We'll look at metal cultures, explore the fringes of the most extreme forms of metal, and, of course, listen to some SCREAMING HEAVY METAL! This is guaranteed to be the most BRUTAL class ever offered at MIT!

Follow the Zoom links to join any class, and all are welcome to join (even those outside the MIT community). Since we're still remote this year, seating isn't limited and all classes will be held on Zoom. All information can be found at metal.mit.edu

Full 2022 Schedule of Events (All events start at 6:30 PM ET, and links to the Zoom rooms that will be used are listed below. Keep in mind these times may shift depending on outside factors.)

Heavy Metal 101: Music and Culture
Monday January 10, 2022

An introduction to Heavy Metal. Topics include the musicology of Heavy Metal as well as an examination of Heavy Metal culture. This multimedia extravaganza covers everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal!

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal, Part I
Tuesday, January 11, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the late 1960s through the early 1990s. Topics will include Hard Rock, Archetypal Heavy Metal, the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM), Power Metal, Thrash Metal, and the Big 4.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: The GUTS of Metal - Music Theory and Songwriting with Colin Brumley
Wednesday January 12, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Colin Brumley. Titled "The GUTS of Heavy Metal: Metal Music Theory," join us for an evening of metal music theory and songwriting with Colin Brumley of Dormivore and Noctobre. This presentation will be a deep dive into how metal is made and how it works, from the granular to the bird’s-eye view. Topics will include foundations in classical music theory (no prior knowledge needed), scales and modalities utilized in different types of metal, how to expand your listening, and — new this year! — apply these ingredients, augmented with other musicological factors, towards songwriting via analysis of full original songs. We wouldn’t show you how to make the world’s greatest grilled cheese without actually dissecting one! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Panel About Stage Lighting at Metal Concerts with Shannon Knotts and John Santos
Thursday January 13, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest panelists, John Santos and Shannon Knotts. What does it take to build the atmosphere of a live show with light and staging? This panel will feature two light and staging artists/engineers, John Santos and Shannon Knotts, who will discuss the process and challenges of creating successful shows and what sorts of thinking go into their production. Come with questions! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Feminism and Motherhood with Joan Jocson-Singh
Tuesday January 18, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Joan Jocson-Singh. Joining us to discuss her research surrounding Feminism in Metal/Extreme Metal, Vigilante Feminism, and Motherhood's role within metal, Joan will also open a discussion around the larger questions about metal music in academia and the importance of "academicizing" the genre. 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Heavy Metal Electronics 101 with Dr. Gore
Wednesday January 19, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Dr. Görebläster Körpse-härvest Lunden. In this session, MIT alum and physicist Dr. Gore will present an overview of the complete chain of electronic circuits that makes the heavy metal guitar sound the way it does. The class will cover pickups, effects pedals, amplifiers, and speakers, focusing especially on what happens to the electronic waveform each step of the way. There will also be live demonstrations to accompany the theoretical explanations. 

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part II
Thursday January 20, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the early 1990s to the present. Topics include New American Metal, Metalcore and Grindcore, Black Metal, Death Metal, and Extreme Metal.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Metal Makeup and Fashion with Wacky Jacky
Tuesday January 25, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Wacky Jacky. We've looked a lot at how metal formed and took shape over the years. Though, how can you better look the part, and what do the aesthetics say about the genre as a whole? Come by as Jacky explores various metal fashions and how they've evolved over time and across genres. P.S. Bring your battle vests, cuffs, and best corpse paint for this lecture.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Vocals with Paul Buckley
Wednesday January 26, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Paul Buckley. This talk will discuss some background information regarding harsh vocals, how to develop and maintain a harsh vocal style, and examples of how harsh vocals are applied in metal.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part III
Thursday January 27, 2022

This will be a seminar examining the many of the remaining genres of Heavy Metal. Topics will include more obscure genres of Metal Fusion, Experimental and Avant-Garde Metal, and really whatever else we missed so far. It's going to get weird.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal with Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo
Tuesday, February 1, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturers, Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo. Nelson and Daniel will discuss the topic of Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal. Throughout their research, they have revealed that metal as practiced, performed, and promoted in Latin America has a decolonial inflection whereby many bands in the region highlight their respective country’s colonial history and offer ways to challenge the conditions and ideologies inherited from said history. They will also discuss how their work in Latin American metal has inspired and informed a growing interest in the topic of metal in the Global South.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part IV
Thursday February 3, 2022

An extra class? We'll have a couple extra surprises before we close this year out!

Zoom Link

MIT Mystery Hunt
Jan/14 Fri 11:59AM

More information at http://puzzles.mit.edu/!

The MIT Mystery Hunt is a puzzlehunt competition that takes place on the MIT campus every year during the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day weekend. The hunt challenges each participating team to solve a large number of puzzles which lead to an object (called a "coin") hidden somewhere on campus. The winning team gets to write the subsequent year's hunt.

Mystery Hunt was launched in 1981 and is widely regarded as one of the oldest and most complex puzzlehunts in the world. It attracts more than 2,000 people every year and has inspired similar competitions at universities, companies and cities around the world.

MIT VMS Boot Camp Event: Crash Course in Enterprise B2B Sales 4 Startups
Jan/10 Mon 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 09:00AM–12:00PM

Presented by VMS Mentor Kent Summers:

A 2-Day Crash-Course!

As a popular (14+ year) IAP course on “B2B sales,” this workshop is consistently received by attendees with a great deal of enthusiasm and positive reviews. Highlighting practical knowledge of "how to sell," the sessions provide entrepreneurs starting a new venture and business school graduates entering a new profession with basic sales knowledge, skills and tools for success: how to target enterprise sales opportunities, manage a sales process, acquire customers and generate revenue.  

This boot camp includes 2 days of 3-hour sessions, combining lecture, interactive exercises, and anecdotal evidence from real sales situations. During the 2-day boot camp, you will focus on basic concepts, tools and mechanics for sales focus and efficiency. You will also learn more “qualitative” aspects of selling, with emphasis on how to navigate an organization, overcome obstacles and objections, build buyer team consensus, and negotiate to close deals. Attendees will also troubleshoot “failed sales case studies” and recommend corrective action or behavior. 

Kent Summers has been offering the Sales Boot Camp in collaboration with VMS since 2008. He regularly presents sales workshops at the Harvard MBA program, the Wharton School of Business and many domestic and international business accelerators. Summers founded and sold three software companies in the Boston area, and since 2002, has helped many new MIT companies navigate critical sales strategy and execution challenges. His success with early-stage ventures and enterprise sales is uniquely suited to the needs of start-ups and scale-up ventures.

 

Please register here: https://bit.ly/3oWaLpD

 

Meditation for Your Wellbeing
Jan/12 Wed 12:10PM–12:40PM

Community Wellness at MIT Medical offers monthly drop-in meditation and relaxation sessions. Sit back and relax - no experience necessary.

The next session will take place on Wednesday, February 9, 2022. Registration will open for it on January 13, 2022.

Mycotecture, BioHab, MycoHab and Regenerative Food, Medicine, Materials: A surprisingly digital (r)evolution in agriculture and construction
Jan/28 Fri 12:15PM–03:00PM

Online only with interactive live video of mycotecture techniques.

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, hosts key doers in the mycotecture regenerative agriculture and construction materials industries in a series of short presentations and panel Q&A followed by hands-on, live and interactive demonstration of mycotecture techniques by Chris Maurer, via video link to redhouse studios in Cleveland, OH.

Using the exemplar of the BioHab, a joint MIT-SBG-redhouse project currently being deployed in Namibia, architect and founder of redhouse studio Chris Maurer will explain working mycelium methods to reform agriwaste leveraging inflatables to create superior new “bioterials”, self-reproducing buildings, edible and medicinal mushrooms all in one process. Carolyn Cameron-Kirksmith, head of Group Strategic Development of Standard Bank Group and BioHAB will cover Africa’s largest bank continued investment in mco-R&D as well as entrepreneurial deployment directly to market after establishing growing mushrooms operations at BioHab Namibia. We will cover blockchain technologies aiming at accurately tracking product quality and provenance and discuss monetizing carbon sequestration and land stewardship. 

Zoom linkhttps://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148

Links to additional materials:
www.bio-hab.org
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L0EgAVwZbM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG5fe7AfaPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9ovt4QaprE&t=422s

Nourish Yourself
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–01:45PM

Learn practical skills for mindful and intuitive eating and how these approaches can help alleviate stress around food and increase self-trust and satisfaction at meals. If you like, please bring a small food item or snack for mindful eating practice during the workshop.

This workshop is part of a Wellness Coaching Series for IAP 2022. Register for any or all workshops using the same link. Attendees who complete all three workshops will receive a Wellness Education Certificate for IAP 2022 from Community Wellness at MIT Medical.

Upcoming workshop in this series:

Three Habits of Happiness on January 21

Reboot Your Sleep
Jan/07 Fri 01:00PM–01:45PM

Start the new year by learning strategies to help you reboot your sleep schedule, get the best quality sleep you can, and make getting up in the morning easier. Learn about resources to decrease stress and improve sleep health available from MIT.

This workshop is part of a Wellness Coaching Series for IAP 2022. Register for any or all workshops using the same link. Attendees who complete all three workshops will receive a Wellness Education Certificate for IAP 2022 from Community Wellness at MIT Medical.

Upcoming workshops in this series:

Nourish Yourself on January 14

Three Habits of Happiness on January 21

Reconstructing Religion: Can Religious Faith Contribute to the Public Good? Should it have a Place in the Public Square?
Jan/25 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

How did the church get to the point where Christianity as a tradition and Christians, in particular, are often looked at with derision and as an anchor around the neck of society rather than a cool breeze blowing into its sails? Is there a way to imagine religion (specifically Christianity) that promotes human flourishing and strengthens our Democratic Tradition? Is there a place for the faith in the public square and what contributions can it make, if any? Or is it no longer needed?

Dr. Ron Sanders - Affiliate Assistant Professor in Ethics. He holds a Ph.D. in Theology and Christian Ethics from Fuller Theological Seminary, an M.A. in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics from Biola University.

Restorative Justice: ICEO Community Dialogues
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM
Transforming Communities, Classrooms and Conflict
 
Restorative justice challenges us to hold ourselves and our communities accountable to cultivating and maintaining the relationships and systems that deeply center our humanity and align with our core values. How can restorative practices be used to not only address interpersonal harm but transform the ways in which we live, work and learn together in service of a more just and equitable society?
 
In this interactive presentation and discussion, participants will be introduced to the indigenous origins and core tenants of restorative justice; its contemporary practices and applications on college campuses, and how it can help us realize our vision for equity, inclusion and belonging. 
 
The session will be led by Nina Harris, Restorative Resolutions Coordinator (Institute Discrimination Harassment & Response).
 
Science and Faith - friends of foes? (Part 2) - Can a Scientist Believe in the Miracles of Jesus?
Jan/13 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

How do we reconcile miracles with our modern, scientific understanding of nature? Is it reasonable for any thinking person to accept them as true? Do the miraculous claims of Christianity, like the miracles of Jesus, hold up under scrutiny, and what do they mean for us?

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Science and Faith - friends or foes? (Part 1) - Is there Evidence for God in the Universe? Do the Laws of Nature Point to God or lead us away from the idea of a God?
Jan/11 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many people have difficulty reconciling modern science with the Christian faith(as well as other faith traditions) - especially the Biblical account of cosmology and the origins of the universe. The fundamental laws of nature in our universe appear to be "fine-tuned" to allow for intelligent life. In this talk, we'll dive into modern scientific discovery and explore possible explanations for this phenomenon and speculate on the possible role of a designer.

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Stretch Your Impact - faculty talk with Ben Armstrong
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join the MIT PKG Center in conversation with Ben Armstrong, Interim Executive Director and a Research Scientist at MIT’s Industrial Performance Center. His research and teaching examine how workers, firms, and regions adapt to technological change. His current projects include a national plan for the U.S. manufacturing workforce in partnership with the Department of Defense, as well as a policy playbook developing lessons for struggling regional economies in the United States.

In his work, Ben has collaborated with governments, non-profit organizations, and firms to understand how scholarship and education can be useful to practitioners and policymakers. Ben completed his undergraduate degree at Northwestern University and his PhD at MIT. Before graduate school, he helped lead an open-source hardware non-profit and worked at Google Inc.

Want to learn more about Ben’s work? Check out this Forbes article featuring his work. 

On Zoom - RSVP to get Zoom link 

Wednesday, January 19th, at 12 PM

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Stretch Your Impact - social impact tech in education
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Looking to learn more about education, technology, and entrepreneurship?

Do you love music? 

Join the PKG Center and Rhymes with Reason to learn more about using education entrepreneurship to innovate.

We will be joined by Founder & CEO of Rhymes with Reason, Austin Martin. Rhymes with Reason is a "web-based educational platform that uses popular music to help students learn standardized, literacy-related topics, including vocabulary." Austin founded the organization while an undergraduate at Brown University as a means of making education more equitable and culturally inclusive of minority youth. Want to learn more? Watch Austin’s TED Talk learn more about his social innovation in education.  

On Zoom - RSVP to get link 

Thursday, January 13th, at noon ET

Three Habits of Happiness
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–01:45PM

Three habits - gratitude, self-compassion, and mindfulness practices - can have a positive effect on mood and reduce stress. In this workshop, try some of them out and discover what works for you.

This workshop is part of a Wellness Coaching Series for IAP 2022. Register for any or all workshops using the same link. Attendees who complete all three workshops will receive a Wellness Education Certificate for IAP 2022 from Community Wellness at MIT Medical.

UNBOXING RELIGION: Christian History: A Quick Trip Through 2,000 Years
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–03:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Christian History: A Quick Trip Through 2,000 Years

Fr. Michael Medas (Catholic Chaplain), Pastor Andrew Heisen (Lutheran Chaplain) and Deacon James Wilcox (Saint Mary Orthodox Church, Cambridge)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Jews and Judaism 101
Jan/26 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

 

Jews and Judaism 101

Rabbi Menachem Altein (Jewish Chaplain, Chabad)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: The Bahá’í Faith
Jan/27 Thu 07:00PM–08:30PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

The Bahá’í Faith

Brian Aull (Bahá’í Chaplain)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Understanding Hinduism
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–03:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Understanding Hinduism

Swami Tyagananda (Hindu Chaplain)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Understanding Islam and Muslims
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–05:30PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Understanding Islam and Muslims

Sister Nada El-Alami (Muslim Chaplain)

Registration Link

(also offered: Thurs. 1/13 12:00-1:30 and Tues. 1/18 2:00-3:30)