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All About UROP
Jan/04 Tue 04:00PM–05:00PM

Learn all about UROP, including benefits and modes of participation, key ways to identify opportunities, how how to prepare yourself for the UROP search/interview process, and more!

Applying a Systems Thinking Approach to Food Sustainability on MIT Campus
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 01:00PM–05:00PM

Acquire professional systems engineering skills while you help make MIT campus more sustainable!

In this two-day virtual workshop (IAP, not for credit), open to MIT undergraduate students in any year and any major, you will tackle real-world challenges in food sustainability that are relevant to you as a student at MIT. Student teams will apply a systems thinking approach using OPCloud, a state-of-the-art system modeling tool used by professional system engineers.

At the start of Day 1, Professor Edward Crawley from MIT AeroAstro will introduce Professor James W. Jones, a world-renowned expert in food security from the University of Florida. Prof. Jones will present the challenge for the workshop.

Working in small teams, you will create a conceptual model of the challenge and learn how to identify points of leverage (high impact-to-cost ratio) in your model. There is no need to have a team before joining the workshop.

At the end of Day 2, your team will present their suggestions to Prof. Jones and to Susy Jones from MIT Office of Sustainability. Lastly, you will hear about opportunities to (a) develop and implement your suggestions on MIT campus and (b) have your work featured in professional publications.

The workshop will be led by systems thinking educator Dr. Rea Lavi, Lecturer and Curriculum Designer for the NEET undergraduate program at MIT School of Engineering.

You do not need to register to the workshop - just join via zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98867122163

To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop!

Prof. Jones and Dr. Lavi

Aren't We Better Off Without Christianity?
Jan/20 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

40 years ago, sociologists believed that as the world became more modern, more educated, and more scientific, religious belief would naturally decline. Many western intellectuals thought this was both inevitable and desirable: religion would not survive in the modern world, and we modern people would be better off without it. Doesn't Christianity hinder our pursuits of modern values? What is our reality today? Is Christianity positive or negative for individuals and society? And what shapes how we determine what makes us “better off”?

Dr. REBECCA McLAUGHLIN, Ph.D. in English literature from Cambridge University, Theology degree from Oak Hill College in London. Speaker, Writer, and author of Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion. Find out more about Rebecca at www.rebeccamclaughlin.org.

Cybersecurity: 5th Generation of Security
Jan/28 Fri 01:00PM–03:00PM

Cybersecurity mechanisms to date are inadequate.   Moving Target Defenses ─ the Fourth Generation of Security - while beneficial, is incomplete. Third Generation ─ Tolerance and Survivability - solutions have been characterized as Hope and Pray.  

Data Security grapples with distributed networks for Supply Chains, Remote Work Environments, International Trade, Ransomware, and the Insider Threats.  

Can the next generation of security address cyber challenges of Misaligned Incentives, Information Asymmetry, and Externalities? Is Cybersecurity still a TECHNOLOGY discussion? Will vulnerabilities impose new compliance and monitoring requirements, or drive new information sharing partnerships?  The presentation highlights critical infrastructures, as well as commercial and government perspectives.

Leading the discussion will be:

Everardo Ruiz, Ph.D, SDM ’00 and 
COL (Ret) Robert Banks, Ph.D.

This event is in-person and space is limited. Registration is available via Eventbrite.

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/19 Wed 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/95624917949 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/20 Thu 05:30PM–06:00PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/93930057732 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Eloranta Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships Info Session
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

The Peter J. Eloranta Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships are awarded each spring to MIT undergraduates who submit proposals for their own novel research projects and/or further development of innovative ideas, devices, prototypes, etc.

This info session will provide an overview on the Eloranta Fellowships, eligibility guidelines, how to apply, and tips on what makes a strong proposal!

Groupflow - Leveraging AI to untangle the surprising link between ethics, happiness, and business success
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM

This IAP course will teach you how to measure and increase individual happiness and wellbeing, team collaboration and performance, and organizational culture and values, by leveraging the latest advances in AI, NLP, machine learning, and social network analysis to reach groupflow. Groupflow extends the flow concept coined by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi to teams. Groupflow enables teams to reach their highest productive and creative state, cooperating above and beyond of what each team member is capable of. Research has clearly shown what creates happy and motivated employees – giving them respect, empower them to take their own decisions, and be an empathic, humble leader – but it is awfully hard to actually lead by those principles.

Our approach consists of analyzing individuals’ communication patterns and making them self-aware by mirroring their behavior back to them in a privacy-respecting way.  This method is based on 20 years of research from our MIT Collaborative Innovation Networks (COIN) project on leadership, creativity, team building, and positive psychology.

The course is based on the forthcoming book “Groupflow - Leveraging AI to untangle the surprising link between ethics, happiness, and business success

Enrollment: advance signup required by January 23, limited to 25 participants

Attendance: first session teaches basic concepts; second session is small group discussion about use cases and potential projects

Prereq: Basic statistics skills and computer literacy

Instructor: Peter Gloor, pgloor@mit.edu

E-Mail instructor to sign up.

Hypocrisy: If Jesus Christ is so Good, Why is the Church so Bad?
Jan/18 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

In a recent survey at MIT, students were asked, “For you, what makes Christianity or God's existence difficult for you to believe?” The most picked answer was the hypocrisy they see in those who identify as Christian and the Church. There is no arguing that hypocrisy exists among Christians and the Church. Hypocrisy is a massive deterrent for people no matter who it comes from. If Christianity is supposed to make people better, then why associate with something that doesn’t really seem to work? Why accept it as true? How can it be worth considering when it seems like Christians don’t even follow its teachings?

LOU PHILLIPS, Traveling speaker with the Lighten Group, Theological studies at the OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS

IAP Seminar: Investigating Leadership and Engineering through Film and Media: The Making of the Atomic Bomb
Jan/11 Tue 01:00PM–02:30PM

Speakers:
Andrew Silver, Film director, MIT and Sloan Alum
Chris Boebel, Media Development Director, MIT Open Learning

Enrollment limited: Advance sign-up required. Sign-up by 12/15

Using an award-winning BBC mini-series, along with supplemental references from film and books, participants will observe and discuss the leadership of one of the largest engineering projects in history: The “Manhattan Project” that designed and built the world’s first atomic bomb. In a small seminar setting, students will consider leadership of the project and moral responsibility in the context of the devastating use of atomic weapons at the close of World War II, clashing leadership styles between scientists and the military, and how these concerns relate to broader questions of leadership and ethics on complex scientific and engineering projects.

Interested students should contact Andrew Silver (e-mail below) for more information. View trailer.

This course will meet for two sessions:

Session One: Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Leadership “Personas,” Clashing Leadership Styles, Collaboration, and Managing Personalities
Episode 3 of “Oppenheimer” (1980), BBC-TV TV Mini-Series starring Sam Waterston

Session Two: Thursday, January 13, 2022, 1pm-2:30 pm
Morality, Ethics, and Personal Responsibility
Episode 5 of “Oppenheimer”

Both sessions will meet at MIT Open Learning, 600 Technology Square, 2nd Floor

Sponsor(s): MIT Open Learning

Contact: Andrew Silver, asilver@asilverproduction.com

Infinite Careers: Amy Wibowo
Jan/20 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join Amy Wibowo, MIT SB and MEng in EECS, and hear about her career journey, gain advice about your own career, and ask questions.

Amy Wibowo is the founder, editor, and CEO of BubbleSort Zines, a zine dedicated to making computer science more accessible. It has been Amy's life long dream to create zines that make computer science more accessible.

Registration required via Handshake. Space is limited to 30 people. This CAPD event is open to MIT undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and alumni.

Infinite Careers is an alumni speaker series designed to expose students to a variety of career paths and the non-linearity of career decision making. This series allows students to hear the stories of alumni with both traditional and unconventional career paths, and get to know alumni in interesting fields.

Learn more about Amy here: https://shop.bubblesort.io/pages/about-us

Please indicate any accommodation needs by completing the following survey. https://airtable.com/shrfsjcovcoDIN0da
Note: Accommodation requests should be submitted one week in advance of an event. If accommodations are not possible due to the late timing of the request a team member will reach out to you to discuss alternative resources and/or solutions.

Labyrinth Lab IAP: Labyrinths and Wellness
Jan/24 Mon 03:00PM–04:00PM

A labyrinth is an ancient tool for stress reduction, wellness, and centering. In this workshop, learn about different ways labyrinths can be used to enhance your health. 

Labyrinth Lab IAP: The Labyrinth's History and Geometry
Jan/10 Mon 03:00PM–04:00PM

A labyrinth is an ancient tool for stress reduction, wellness, and centering. In this workshop, learn about the history of this tool, and what's so special about its geometric elements.

MIT Bluewater Sailing Informational Session
Jan/20 Thu 07:00PM–08:00PM

MIT Sailing would love for you to join us aboard our museum quality 51' Herreshoff sailboat in Boston Harbor.  Bluewater Sailing is under the supervision of MIT Sailing and their volunteer instructors; the program operates in Boston Harbor on a bigger boat with more teamwork, longer trips and more immersion in the ocean.  This virtual informational session is for those who are new to big boat sailing at MIT and guide you through how to get a sailing card, sign up for a bluewater sail, and what to expect when you climb aboard.  The bluewater program is focused on increasing the exposure of the MIT community to big boat sailing.  For those with sailing experience who are interested in progressing their knowledge, racing, or leading sailing trips, we will discuss the process for earning a bluewater crew and skipper rating towards the end of the session. 

More information about the program and email list signup will be available at http://sailing.mit.edu/bluewater/ 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://mit.zoom.us/j/97839877502

MIT Bluewater Sailing: Cruising, Racing, and Relaxing
Jan/24 Mon 07:00PM–08:00PM

Want to learn more about bluewater sailing at MIT? Come hear stories about different adventures ranging from cruising to racing from Boston to Maine and beyond. 

 

More information about the program and email list signup will be available at http://sailing.mit.edu/bluewater/ 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://mit.zoom.us/j/97839877502

 

MIT Heavy Metal 101 IAP 2022
Jan/10 Mon 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM

Not a Metallurgy class! This veteran crash-course is coming back in full force and will have you head banging, air guitaring, and devil horn raising in no time! Learn everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal, including how Metallica tries too hard to be cool, why Lemmy IS God (RIP), how the genre tackles some of today's biggest sociopolitical challenges, why metal bands exist in every country on Earth, and why you're probably already a metalhead without even knowing it.  

WARNING: This series most definitely goes to 11!  Earplugs optional. We'll look at metal cultures, explore the fringes of the most extreme forms of metal, and, of course, listen to some SCREAMING HEAVY METAL! This is guaranteed to be the most BRUTAL class ever offered at MIT!

Follow the Zoom links to join any class, and all are welcome to join (even those outside the MIT community). Since we're still remote this year, seating isn't limited and all classes will be held on Zoom. All information can be found at metal.mit.edu

Full 2022 Schedule of Events (All events start at 6:30 PM ET, and links to the Zoom rooms that will be used are listed below. Keep in mind these times may shift depending on outside factors.)

Heavy Metal 101: Music and Culture
Monday January 10, 2022

An introduction to Heavy Metal. Topics include the musicology of Heavy Metal as well as an examination of Heavy Metal culture. This multimedia extravaganza covers everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal!

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal, Part I
Tuesday, January 11, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the late 1960s through the early 1990s. Topics will include Hard Rock, Archetypal Heavy Metal, the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM), Power Metal, Thrash Metal, and the Big 4.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: The GUTS of Metal - Music Theory and Songwriting with Colin Brumley
Wednesday January 12, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Colin Brumley. Titled "The GUTS of Heavy Metal: Metal Music Theory," join us for an evening of metal music theory and songwriting with Colin Brumley of Dormivore and Noctobre. This presentation will be a deep dive into how metal is made and how it works, from the granular to the bird’s-eye view. Topics will include foundations in classical music theory (no prior knowledge needed), scales and modalities utilized in different types of metal, how to expand your listening, and — new this year! — apply these ingredients, augmented with other musicological factors, towards songwriting via analysis of full original songs. We wouldn’t show you how to make the world’s greatest grilled cheese without actually dissecting one! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Panel About Stage Lighting at Metal Concerts with Shannon Knotts and John Santos
Thursday January 13, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest panelists, John Santos and Shannon Knotts. What does it take to build the atmosphere of a live show with light and staging? This panel will feature two light and staging artists/engineers, John Santos and Shannon Knotts, who will discuss the process and challenges of creating successful shows and what sorts of thinking go into their production. Come with questions! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Feminism and Motherhood with Joan Jocson-Singh
Tuesday January 18, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Joan Jocson-Singh. Joining us to discuss her research surrounding Feminism in Metal/Extreme Metal, Vigilante Feminism, and Motherhood's role within metal, Joan will also open a discussion around the larger questions about metal music in academia and the importance of "academicizing" the genre. 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Heavy Metal Electronics 101 with Dr. Gore
Wednesday January 19, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Dr. Görebläster Körpse-härvest Lunden. In this session, MIT alum and physicist Dr. Gore will present an overview of the complete chain of electronic circuits that makes the heavy metal guitar sound the way it does. The class will cover pickups, effects pedals, amplifiers, and speakers, focusing especially on what happens to the electronic waveform each step of the way. There will also be live demonstrations to accompany the theoretical explanations. 

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part II
Thursday January 20, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the early 1990s to the present. Topics include New American Metal, Metalcore and Grindcore, Black Metal, Death Metal, and Extreme Metal.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Metal Makeup and Fashion with Wacky Jacky
Tuesday January 25, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Wacky Jacky. We've looked a lot at how metal formed and took shape over the years. Though, how can you better look the part, and what do the aesthetics say about the genre as a whole? Come by as Jacky explores various metal fashions and how they've evolved over time and across genres. P.S. Bring your battle vests, cuffs, and best corpse paint for this lecture.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Vocals with Paul Buckley
Wednesday January 26, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Paul Buckley. This talk will discuss some background information regarding harsh vocals, how to develop and maintain a harsh vocal style, and examples of how harsh vocals are applied in metal.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part III
Thursday January 27, 2022

This will be a seminar examining the many of the remaining genres of Heavy Metal. Topics will include more obscure genres of Metal Fusion, Experimental and Avant-Garde Metal, and really whatever else we missed so far. It's going to get weird.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal with Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo
Tuesday, February 1, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturers, Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo. Nelson and Daniel will discuss the topic of Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal. Throughout their research, they have revealed that metal as practiced, performed, and promoted in Latin America has a decolonial inflection whereby many bands in the region highlight their respective country’s colonial history and offer ways to challenge the conditions and ideologies inherited from said history. They will also discuss how their work in Latin American metal has inspired and informed a growing interest in the topic of metal in the Global South.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part IV
Thursday February 3, 2022

An extra class? We'll have a couple extra surprises before we close this year out!

Zoom Link

Patent Law Essentials: What Scientists, Engineers & Entrepreneurs Need to Know
Jan/12 Wed 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 07:00PM–09:00PM

Patent protection for inventions is a valuable component of business strategy for startups and established companies. This workshop covers the basics of U.S. patent law, including the patent application process, prosecution, litigation, and licensing. Undergraduates, graduate students, and post-docs in science, engineering, and business are welcome. We will discuss what recent developments in patent law mean for inventors, and draw examples ranging from the computer software to the pharmaceutical industries.

The event will be held over Zoom. Registered participants will receive the Zoom link via email.

Recruiting + Interviewing UROPs Workshop
Jan/05 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

Learn about how to advertise UROP opportunities and other ways to recruit UROP students. We will also cover tips to interviewing potential UROP students with key questions/topics to cover in interviews. There will be time for Q+A at the end. No advance sign-up.

Science and Faith - friends of foes? (Part 2) - Can a Scientist Believe in the Miracles of Jesus?
Jan/13 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

How do we reconcile miracles with our modern, scientific understanding of nature? Is it reasonable for any thinking person to accept them as true? Do the miraculous claims of Christianity, like the miracles of Jesus, hold up under scrutiny, and what do they mean for us?

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Science and Faith - friends or foes? (Part 1) - Is there Evidence for God in the Universe? Do the Laws of Nature Point to God or lead us away from the idea of a God?
Jan/11 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many people have difficulty reconciling modern science with the Christian faith(as well as other faith traditions) - especially the Biblical account of cosmology and the origins of the universe. The fundamental laws of nature in our universe appear to be "fine-tuned" to allow for intelligent life. In this talk, we'll dive into modern scientific discovery and explore possible explanations for this phenomenon and speculate on the possible role of a designer.

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Stretch Your Impact - Using Social Media for Good
Jan/27 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join the PKG Center for our last “Stretch Your Impact” session of IAP. 

For this season finale, we are thrilled to be joined by Pabel Martinez and Adán Chávez. Currently, Pabel serves as Founder and CEO of Plurawl and Global Account Director at Tik Tok. Adán is U.S. Politics and Global Outreach Manager for Meta, previously know as Facebook.

Learn more about our speakers here. 

On Zoom - RSVP to get link.

Stretch Your Impact - faculty talk with Ben Armstrong
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join the MIT PKG Center in conversation with Ben Armstrong, Interim Executive Director and a Research Scientist at MIT’s Industrial Performance Center. His research and teaching examine how workers, firms, and regions adapt to technological change. His current projects include a national plan for the U.S. manufacturing workforce in partnership with the Department of Defense, as well as a policy playbook developing lessons for struggling regional economies in the United States.

In his work, Ben has collaborated with governments, non-profit organizations, and firms to understand how scholarship and education can be useful to practitioners and policymakers. Ben completed his undergraduate degree at Northwestern University and his PhD at MIT. Before graduate school, he helped lead an open-source hardware non-profit and worked at Google Inc.

Want to learn more about Ben’s work? Check out this Forbes article featuring his work. 

On Zoom - RSVP to get Zoom link 

Wednesday, January 19th, at 12 PM

​ 

Stretch Your Impact - social impact tech in education
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Looking to learn more about education, technology, and entrepreneurship?

Do you love music? 

Join the PKG Center and Rhymes with Reason to learn more about using education entrepreneurship to innovate.

We will be joined by Founder & CEO of Rhymes with Reason, Austin Martin. Rhymes with Reason is a "web-based educational platform that uses popular music to help students learn standardized, literacy-related topics, including vocabulary." Austin founded the organization while an undergraduate at Brown University as a means of making education more equitable and culturally inclusive of minority youth. Want to learn more? Watch Austin’s TED Talk learn more about his social innovation in education.  

On Zoom - RSVP to get link 

Thursday, January 13th, at noon ET

Summer Internships with Coding it Forward - info session
Jan/06 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Looking for a meaningful tech internship for next summer?

Want to innovate at the intersection of tech and public service?

Join the PKG Center and Coding it Forward to learn about paid tech internships in government in the US. 

 

On Zoom - RSVP to get the Zoom link

Thursday, January 6th, noon ET

 

In 2017, a group of Boston-area technology students found themselves frustrated by the lack of mission-driven technical internships - so they decided to do something about it! Today, Coding it Forward offers paid internships for innovative technology students to work with federal, state, and local government offices. Applications for the summer programs open in January.

 

  • As a Civic Digital Fellow, you can spend the summer deepening your understanding of the technology behind federal government services and applying your skills to develop solutions that will serve everyday Americans.
  • Or, apply to the Civic Innovation Corps for the opportunity to collaborate with a host office at the state or local level to make government more effective and efficient for all.

 

Hear from MIT students who’ve participated recently and bring your questions for Coding it Forward’s Deputy Director, Ariana Soto.

Technical Leadership Panel: The Value of Leadership Development During Graduate School
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–03:00PM

Do you envision “making the world a better place” after graduating from MIT as an engineer or technical expert? If so, you will need more than technical skills to build the teams and support needed to implement creative solutions to today’s complex problems.

Join other MIT graduate students for this workshop focused on the importance of preparing as a student to lead teams in engineering and technical environments. David Nino, a Senior Lecturer and Senior Program Manager of the MIT Graduate Program in Engineering Leadership, will be moderating a panel to discuss the value of developing leadership skills while completing graduate degrees in technical fields. All panelists are leading practitioners who will share their unique perspectives and experiences on this topic.

Confirmed panelists include:

  • Dr. Leslie Dewan, CEO of RadiantNano and former MIT Corporation Board Member
  • John Strackhouse, Senior Partner at Caldwell Partners
  • Dr. Natalya Bailey, Co-founder and CTO of Accion Systems

This workshop will be held virtually on January 14, 2022, from 1:00 – 3:00 PM. The Technical Leadership Panel will be held during the first 90 minutes, and the last 30 minutes of the workshop will review details about how to earn our program’s Graduate Certificate in Technical Leadership.  Members of the Dean of Engineering’s Graduate Student Advisory Group will discuss our graduate certificate.

Who Should Join this Event and Why

All MIT graduate students are invited to join. Employers in both academia and industry consistently rank leadership as among their most sought-after skills and this is especially true today. Anyone who is motivated can build leadership skills while also earning MIT graduate degrees. For those interested in learning more about our Graduate Certificate in Technical Leadership, see https://gelp.mit.edu/grad-students/graduate-certificate-technical-leadership-interim-requirements

 

To Register

Sign up here https://mit.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bErWcdlFN8A2sUC by January 12, 2022

Contact: Lisa Stagnone, Senior Program Assistant, 617-253-3251, lstag@mit.edu

Registrants are encouraged to review the backgrounds of our speakers and submit your questions for them in advance of our workshop.  We will send everyone more details on this once students are registered.

Techno-Inquiry Reading Group
Jan/04 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 04:00PM–05:00PM

With this reading group, we aim at slowing down and promote critical reflection over the work we do everyday. We will do this by investigating, together, questions surrounding power dynamics within scientific knowledge, feminist views over politics and matters of situated knowledge, and the ethics animating the construct of technology as we know it. Our goal is to collectively reflect on some of these concepts and ground them in our own practice

You can learn more about the reading group here: https://bit.ly/techno-inquiry

Sign up filling out this incredibly short form: https://forms.gle/UNrXqvfqKxJDP2xr5

The Market for Ideas
Jan/28 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM

Product Innovation and invention surges ahead at rates unimaginable just a few decades ago. With good reason inventors protect their intellectual property (IP) internationally with a variety of tools - patents, copyright, and trademarks. 

But how should an inventor monetize the invention? Form and build a startup? Sell the invention? License it? Utilize Open-Source?

The speakers will examine the basics of patents, copyright, and trademark and consider monetization – entrepreneurship by building a startup, outright sale, and out-licensing – as well as factors and recent trends affecting patent valuation. The presentation is based on decades of worldwide SVP, Director, and entrepreneurial experience in product development and intellectual property at Intellectual Ventures, Oracle, Alcatel, Texas Instruments, Sun Microsystems, private law firms, and startups.

Leading the discussion:

Everardo Ruiz, Ph.D. , SM ‘00 (Managing Director, Energy Transition Partners)

Sanjay Prasad, J.D. (Managing Director, Energy Transition Partners)

This event is in person and space is limited. Registration is available via Eventbrite

Three Creative Techniques for Solving Open-Ended Challenges
Jan/12 Wed 02:30PM–03:30PM

In this virtual workshop (IAP, not for credit) open to MIT undergraduate students of all majors, you will practice and apply three creative techniques for solving open-ended challenges in any field. All participants will tackle the same challenge and generate creative ideas for solving it.

Following the ideation activity, participants will vote anonymously on the best idea generated by each technique. Participants with the top scoring idea for each technique will each receive $40 in TechCash.

The workshop will be conducted by two experts on thinking skills in science and engineering education: Dr. Rea Lavi, Lecturer and Curriculum Designer for the NEET undergraduate program at MIT School of Engineering, and Dr. Deniz Marti, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Learning Incubator at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

You do not need to register to the workshop, just join via zoom (MIT Touchstone login): https://mit.zoom.us/j/95869719648

To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

At the end of the workshop, Dr. Lavi will briefly introduce his new spring class, open to all majors, where first-year students and sophomores will practice and apply a wide variety of problem-solving methods and techniques to real-world challenges in climate and sustainability. 

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop!

Rea Lavi and Deniz Marti

Three Creative Techniques for Solving Open-Ended Challenges
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–03:30PM

Apply creative techniques and win prizes! In this virtual workshop (IAP, not for credit) open to MIT undergraduate students of all majors, you will practice and apply three creative techniques for solving open-ended challenges in any field. All participants will tackle the same challenge and generate creative ideas for solving it.

Following the ideation activity, participants will vote anonymously on the best idea generated by each technique. Participants with the top scoring idea for each technique will each receive $60 in TechCash.

The workshop will be conducted by two experts on thinking skills in science and engineering education: Dr. Rea Lavi, Lecturer and Curriculum Designer for the NEET undergraduate program at MIT School of Engineering, and Dr. Deniz Marti, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Learning Incubator at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

You do not need to register to the workshop, just join via zoom (MIT Touchstone login): https://mit.zoom.us/j/95112800490

To receive a calendar invite to the event and an email reminder 24hrs before the event, click here.

At the end of the workshop, Dr. Lavi will briefly introduce his new spring course, open to all majors, where first-year students and sophomores will practice and apply a wide variety of problem-solving methods and techniques to real-world challenges in climate and sustainability. You can view the course syllabus here.

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop!

Drs. Rea Lavi and Deniz Marti realavi@mit.edu

Tips + Strategies to Find a UROP
Jan/13 Thu 03:30PM–04:30PM

Join us to learn key ways to find research opportunities in your area(s) of interest. Includes overview on UROP postings, how to identify faculty/labs that align with your research interests, best practices when emailing supervisors, as well as resume and interviewing tips. There will be time to ask questions and receive suggestions based on your personal research interests! 

UROP Project Planning Workshop for Supervisors
Jan/11 Tue 04:00PM–05:00PM

Join us as we review key characteristics of a successful UROP experience, and tips and strategies to develop a UROP project that best helps the UROP student, the lab, and you! No advance sign-up.

Winter School 2022
Jan/04 Tue 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 07:00PM–09:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 07:00PM–09:00PM

Winter School is a chance to learn how to safely go on winter adventures. We lead a variety of day trips on the weekends for beginners to advanced outdoors people alike. Activities include hiking, ice climbing, cross country skiing, backcountry skiing, and creative combinations thereof. Affordable gear rentals are also available through the MITOC office. 

 

Educational lectures are in person and will happen Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 7-9pm. The first two lectures are mandatory for all participants in the Winter School program.

For more information on the Winter School program please see the website: https://mitoc.mit.edu/events/winter-school 

 

Event partially funded by the GSC Funding Board.