MIT Libraries

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Writing your literature review: getting started with the libraries
Jan/25 Tue 11:00AM–12:00PM

Are you writing a literature review for a thesis or an article? Need to find background information and go deep into the literature to find out what has been done before? Join us for this virtual workshop to get more information about using resources from the MIT Libraries and techniques for identifying places to look for literature, tips on keeping track of what you've found, and an overview of the structure and role of the literature review in the research process.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/litreview

Author Rights Workshop
Jan/20 Thu 03:00PM–04:30PM

When you publish in scholarly journals, you’re usually required to give up some rights in your work. In this seminar, MIT librarians Katharine Dunn and Katie Zimmerman will show you what to look for in author contracts and discuss ways to retain rights to share and reuse your work, including via MIT's open access policies.

 

Katharine Dunn is a scholarly communications librarian at MIT, helping researchers and students make their work more openly available.
Katie Zimmerman is the Director of Copyright Strategy for the MIT Libraries, helping the libraries and the MIT community make informed copyright decisions.

Basics of Fair Use
Jan/07 Fri 03:00PM–04:30PM

New things are built on what came before.  If your work uses copyrighted material, you should know about fair use.  What are your rights with regard to prior works?  What requires permission and what doesn’t?  This session will cover the basics of fair use for copyrighted works, so that you know your rights whether you are text mining the scientific literature, adapting a song, or sharing an image you found online. 

Bioscience Protocols and Methods: Recipes for Success
Jan/19 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

A couple hours with the Libraries' protocols and methods resources can save you a couple of weeks in the lab. Need to know how to do Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity in freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans? Improve your efficiency by learning strategies for finding published research protocols and methods. This session is a hands-on practicum that introduces attendees to resources that support bioscience bench research.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8594399

Book and Letter Making Lab: Day One –Writing and Letterlocking Technology
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM

Book and Letter Making Lab is a three-day interactive exploration of books and correspondence, including talks, workshops, and making in MIT's Wunsch Conservation Lab. With inspiration from MIT Libraries' historical and contemporary distinctive collections and special guests' help, we will experiment with book, print, writing, and publishing technologies.

Day One will focus on creating, decorating, sharing, and collective documentation through the media of writing and letterlocking. Instructors: Jana Dambrogio; Dr. Nur Sobers Khan, Director of the Aga Khan Documentation Center; Holly Jackson '22, algorithm engineer; and Sheree Watson, MD, a pediatrics specialist with interest in diversity and representation, who works on research and letter-writer identification (mainly focusing on individuals from marginalized communities) among other realms for the Unlocking History Research Group.

Anyone wishing to attend all three sessions must register for each session separately.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/WunschLab12Jan

Book and Letter Making Lab: Day Three - Artists’ Books, Tarot, and Zines
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM

Book and Letter Making Lab is a three-day interactive exploration of books and correspondence that will include talks, workshops, and making in MIT’s Wunsch Conservation Lab. With inspiration from MIT Libraries’ historical and contemporary distinctive collections, and with the help of special guests, we will experiment with book, print, writing and publishing technologies.

Day Three will feature artists’ books, tarot, and zines as vehicles for self-expression and collective content. Kai Smith, Thera Webb, and Jennifer Pellecchia will focus on ways that new technologies can be incorporated into ancient structures and methods. 

Anyone wishing to attend all three sessions must register for each session separately.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/WunschLab14Jan

Book and Letter Making Lab: Day Two - Form & Content: Book Writing & Bookbinding
Jan/13 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM

Book and Letter Making Lab is a three-day interactive exploration of books and correspondence, including talks, workshops, and making in MIT’s Wunsch Conservation Lab.

On Day Two, we’ll host an author talk with Kaija Langley. Mattie Clear and Alex McGee will talk about journals and SciFi zines from MIT’s collections. At the same time, Martha Edgerton and other trained bookbinders will offer tips and tricks on many aspects of bookmaking, from using a plough to decorating leather with a hedgehog-unicorn finishing tool.

Anyone wishing to attend all three sessions must register for each session separately.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/WunschLab13Jan

Building the Independent Nation: Morocco’s architectural heritage, 1940-1980
Jan/18 Tue 05:00PM–06:30PM

This lecture will highlight some of the built experiences in Morocco between 1940 and 1980, assessing its significance within the long cultural history of Morocco. It concludes with a discussion of architectural heritage preservation, posing such questions as what are the criteria for determining what should be documented and preserved, and what are the challenges in doing so?

The lecture is intended for all audiences interested in architecture and planning, as well as those interested in learning more about Moroccan architecture and culture. The presentation will be followed by an extended Q&A.

Speaker Biography:
Lahbib El Moumni is an architect and professor at the school of Architecture in Casablanca, Morocco. In 2016 he and fellow architect Imad Dahmani founded Association MAMMA (Mémoire des Architectes Modernes Marocains) to highlight the built heritage of Morocco from the last 15 years of the Protectorate through 1980. The work of MAMMA includes researching and archiving architectural heritage of this period, as well as raising awareness of it through conferences, workshops, exhibitions, and seminars on the architecture, art, and history of Modern Morocco.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/ModernMorocco 

Carpentries @ MIT: Intro to UnixShell/Python/Git
Jan/19 Wed 12:30PM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 08:30PM–05:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–05:00PM

Software Carpentry aims to help researchers get their work done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic research computing skills. This hands-on introductory workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

This four-session event takes place on three days. You are expected to attend the workshop on all three days. If you can no longer make it to the workshop, please be sure to cancel your registration since we may have a long waiting list.

For workshop details: https://carpentriesmit.github.io/2022-01-19-mit/ Please follow the Setup instructions on this linked page to install needed software and packages before attending the workshop.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/carpentries2022-01-19

Registration opens at 12:00pm on December 13, 2021.

Computational Access and Use of Texts and Data behind Paywalls: Challenges and Resources 
Jan/25 Tue 11:30AM–01:00PM

The rise of applied data science, digital humanities, machine learning, and artificial intelligence has resulted in an increased need for computational access and reuse of research data and publications, many of which are only available behind paywalls and governed by restrictive terms of use. What can you do with proprietary sources, how do you gain access, and how can you make your own research output from such sources shareable are questions that many are asking. Join three experts from the MIT Libraries in this session to learn about the copyright and contractual implications of paywalled data sources and how you can use them and share your results.

MIT Kerberos Required to register. 

Data Management: File Organization
Jan/11 Tue 02:00PM–04:00PM

Do you struggle with organizing your research data?  Wonder if there’s a better way to arrange and name your data files to optimize your work? This workshop will teach you practical techniques for organizing your data files. Topics include: file and folder organizational structures, file naming, and versioning. Hands-on exercises will help you to apply the covered concepts to your particular data projects and challenges.

Details for connecting to this online session will be provided to registered participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/fileOrg_jan22

Do Right by Your Research Data
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM

Congratulations—you’ve got research data! This session will walk you through the dos and don’ts associated with research data and artifacts, all of those associated bits of information necessary to understand research data. These can include structured data, images, unstructured data, metadata, analysis scripts, analysis environment, and much more. We’ll cover the tools and resources available to you for making decisions about your research data (and associated bits) with regard to use agreements, security requirements, and copyright and licensing. We’ll also explore some case studies and do a practical applications exercise.

 

Amy Nurnberger is the Program Head for Data Management Services at MIT libraries. Amy also serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Learning Analytics program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Within the broader research data community, Amy is a co-chair of the Research Data Alliance (RDA)/World Data Services Publishing Data Workflows Working Group and the RDA Education and Training on Handling Research Data Interest Group, and she is the elected co-chair of the RDA Organizational Advisory Board. She also sits on the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee and the editorial board of Patterns - The Science of Data.

Eye on A.I.: Decoding the Bias
Jan/25 Tue 07:00PM–08:30PM

Sasha Costanza-Chock, Shalini Kantayya, Safiya Noble and Kishawna Peck speak with Ethan Zuckerman to discuss biases, equity, transparency, and governance as they  relate to machine learning.  

In the 2020 film Coded Bias, filmmaker Shalini Kantayya explores the fallout of MIT Media Lab researcher Joy Buolamwini’s discovery that facial recognition does not see dark-skinned faces accurately, and her journey to push for the first-ever legislation in the U.S. to govern against bias in the algorithms that impact us all.

In this panel discussion, leading experts working in the field of machine learning discuss the underlying prejudices embedded in computer code and how we might unravel these predispositions and ensure all humans are treated equally by both human and machine.  The discussion will focus on racial and gender biases in artificial intelligence (A.I.) and how it affects our day to day living. 

Registration is required.  

As a component of the program, we encourage participants to view Coded Bias.  The film is available to current MIT community members here; it is also available to members of the general public on Netflix.  

The MIT Libraries is committed to accessibility.  Please email us if you would like to request accommodation to participate in this program.  Please let us know as far in advance as possible and we will do our best to meet your request. 

This event is presented in collaboration with the Toronto Public Library and is part of TPL's On Civil Society series.

Finding Demographic Data
Jan/13 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

Join us for brief overview of census data followed by a demonstration of library resources you can use to query and download demographic data. While the workshop will focus on US data, we will discuss general search strategies for finding international data and include links to library databases. We will also mention resources you can use to map this data.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/demographic_data_jan2022

GIS Level 1: Introduction to GIS & Mapping (In Person)
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–12:00PM

Our in-person GIS workshop is canceled but we will still be offering this workshop online on 1/4. Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/gislevel1_jan22

Learn how to read and interpret maps and data and use basic cartography principles to create maps that can be used in reports and presentations. You will have the option of completing short exercises using QGIS or ArcGIS Pro as well as a longer exercise after the workshop for additional learning.

You must already have campus access in order to attend. We will not be issuing guest passes for those not already in MIT covidpass. An MIT ID is required to enter the GIS & Data Lab.

Prefer to attend online? This same workshop will be offered virtually on 1/4/22.

GIS Level 1: Introduction to GIS & Mapping (Online)
Jan/04 Tue 01:00PM–03:30PM

Learn how to read and interpret maps and data and use basic cartography principles to create maps that can be used in reports and presentations. You will have the option of completing short exercises using QGIS or ArcGIS Pro as well as a longer exercise after the workshop for additional learning.

A few days before the workshop we will send information about installing the required software.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/gislevel1_jan22

GIS Level 2: Introduction to Spatial Analysis
Jan/18 Tue 01:00PM–03:30PM

Expand your experience with desktop GIS software and learn how to use analysis tools to query data, conduct spatial statistics, and analyze vector and raster data using QGIS or ArcGIS Pro.

Previous GIS experience is required, such as taking the Intro to GIS workshop.

A few days before the workshop we will send information about installing the required software.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/gislevel2_jan22

GIS Level 3: Automating your work in ArcGIS Pro
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–05:00PM

Do you want to automate your work in Arcgis Pro so you can run processes on many datasets or run the same process on a different dataset a year from now? The goal of this workshop is to get you started on automating your work in Arcgis Pro and giving you tools to make your research reproducable. This workshop introduces you to Model Builder, a visual programming language that gives you access to all Arcgis Pro tools. You will next learn the very basics of coding in Python then start working with arcpy, the Arcgis Pro Python Module. Be prepared to write code during the workshop.

You must already have campus access in order to attend. We will not be issuing guest passes for those not already in MIT covidpass. An MIT ID is required to enter the GIS & Data Lab.

Prerequisite: a basic knowledge of Arcgis Pro, including analysis tools Clip and Buffer. Some scripting experience in Stata, Matlab, R, or another language is helpful.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/arcpy2022

GIS Topics: Introduction to Planet and Planet Explorer: How to Access Daily Imagery
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM

This session is a non-technical introduction to Planet, Planet satellites and Planet imagery. In this presentation you will learn more about Planet satellites and the imaging sensors onboard. You will also learn the different ways in which users can access Planet imagery. Finally, there will be a live demonstration of how to use Planet Explorer, our online tool to help you search and download Planet imagery.

  • Introduction to Planet and Planet satellites
  • Introduction to Planet Platforms and Integrations
  • Demonstration of Planet Explorer

Speaker: Austin Stone, Customer Success Manager, Education & Research, Planet

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/planet_intro_iap2022

GIS Topics: Performing imagery analysis using Deep learning tools in ArcGIS Pro
Jan/20 Thu 02:00PM–05:00PM

ArcGIS Pro allows you to use statistical or machine learning classification methods to classify remote-sensing imagery. Deep learning models can be integrated with ArcGIS Pro for object detection, object classification, and image classification. In this workshop, we will show the workflow from data preparation, run the model, use deep learning tools and parameter. We will also cover the ready-to-use geospatial AI models available in the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World.

Prerequisites: Working knowledge of ArcGIS Pro

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/deeplearning_ArcGISPro_Jan2022

Image Credit: ESA – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

GIS Topics: Using the Cloud to Compute and Analyze Daily Satellite Imagery
Jan/12 Wed 02:00PM–03:00PM

This session is geared for technical users and those who wish to use cloud computing platforms, such as Google Earth Engine for satellite image processing and data analysis. This presentation, given by Sam Roy, Solutions Architect at Planet, will cover how to deliver Planet imagery directly to Google Cloud Project using Planet’s API’s (Delivery sample will be provided as a Jupyter Notebook). Furthermore, this session will demonstrate how to connect your Google Cloud Project to your Google Earth Engine account and perform spectral analyses in the Google Earth Engine environment.

  • Delivery to Google Cloud Project using Planet API’s
  • Introduction to Cloud Native Environment: Google Earth Engine
  • Demonstrate Examples of Cloud Processing on Planet Imagery

MIT Touchstone authentication is required to register. Email gishelp@mit.edu before the workshop if you don't already have an MIT Planet account.

Speaker: Sam Roy PhD, Solutions Architect, Planet

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/planet_cloud_iap2022

Introduction to cleaning and prepping data with OpenRefine
Jan/13 Thu 02:00PM–04:00PM

OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a free, open source tool for working with messy data: cleaning it; transforming it from one format into another; and extending it with web services and external data. In this workshop, we’ll go through how to use OpenRefine to explore your data, clean it, transform it, and prep it for further analysis or visualization work. This is an introductory session; no prior experience with OpenRefine is required. A basic understanding of tabular data (spreadsheets) and familiarity with Microsoft Excel is helpful.

Attendees should download and install OpenRefine onto their computers prior to the class.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/openRefine_jan22

Is it in the Public Domain?
Jan/21 Fri 03:00PM–04:00PM

Explore the public domain in this seminar. When does copyright expire, and how do you know when something is free to use? Katie Zimmerman, Director of Copyright Strategy for MIT Libraries, will discuss the public domain and attendees will put their newly learned skills to use on historical materials from the MIT Libraries.

It Must Be Now! Terri Lyne Carrington, Braxton Cook, and Sean Jones: renowned jazz artists on composing with a social justice lens
Jan/13 Thu 05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 05:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 05:00PM

Three Thursday conversations with renowned jazz artists on composing with a
social justice lens

IAP 2021: It Must Be Now!— Advancing social justice actions through music and media

January 13, 20, and 27: 5:00-6:30pm

Attend individual conversations or the full series as a whole: these events are remote and will be live-streamed on Zoom. This event was previously scheduled for the Lewis Library but will now be a virtual event, register for event link.

Join Terri Lyne Carrington, Braxton Cook, and Sean Jones, the composers for It Must Be Now! (IMBN!) as they each discuss their process for composing new music on themes of racial and social injustice.

IMBN! is a multi-year project culminating in a large-scale work for MIT musicians on May 7th, 2022. These conversations over IAP aim to provide an opportunity for the composers to share the behind-the-scenes of their creative process, and for the MIT/Greater Boston community to engage in open dialogue about how these themes take hold across the MIT campus and beyond.

Attend individual conversations or the full series as a whole. Light refreshments served after each event.

Register here.

____________________________

Between the Light and the Dark

Thursday, January 13th — 5:00-6:30pm

Braxton Cook’s composition dives into the juxtaposition between the light and the dark as he questions where we find ourselves as a society facing the collective trauma of the pandemic and police brutality while attempting to adjust our perspective to emphasize what we have instead of what we’ve lost. The audience conversation will be facilitated by Tracie D. Jones, Assistant Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the MIT School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

______________________________

The Resilience of Black Women

Thursday, January 20th — 5:00-6:30pm

Terri Lyne Carrington’s composition investigates the common struggles, inherent truths and sheer resilience of Black women, born into a world of injustice and tasked with navigating the overt and subliminal burdens placed on them while claiming the right to be free and whole. Carrington’s piece reflects on the legacy of creativity and invention of enslaved Africans and their descendants and aims to find a path forward to abolition, self-determination, and justice.

_______________________________

What if we were all connected?

Thursday, January 27th – 5:00-6:30pm

Sean Jones’ composition explores the concept of Pangea (an ancient supercontinent) as an Afrofuturism vehicle, probing the question of whether a more geographically linked world would still cause such deep rifts and misunderstandings of who we are as human beings?

These conversations are sponsored by the MIT Center for Art, Science and Technology, the MIT Lewis Music Library, and MIT Music and Theater Arts.

It Must Be Now! Performance
Saturday, May 7, 2022
More details coming soon

LabArchives Inventory at MIT
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

LabArchives is an Electronic Lab Notebook system which MIT has an enterprise license for. The LabArchives support team (labarchives-support@mit.edu) has invited trainers from LabArchives to provide two virtual training sessions. These sessions will introduce the key features relevant to your use in a research or teaching lab, provide tips on tailoring a notebook to your specific needs, plus time to ask questions in order to save you time and get started using the platform.

The focus of this session is the new Inventory feature for streamlining the organization, tracking, and ordering of lab inventory.

Speaker: Hannah A. Clark, Enterprise Client Services, LabArchives, LLC - Better Science

Register: https://labarchives.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcsf-msrzIrGtMVWZAK9S-BVj2DMzu236n1

LabArchives Scheduler at MIT
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM

LabArchives is an Electronic Lab Notebook system which MIT has an enterprise license for. The LabArchives support team (labarchives-support@mit.edu) has invited trainers from LabArchives to provide two virtual training sessions. These sessions will introduce the key features relevant to your use in a research or teaching lab, provide tips on tailoring a notebook to your specific needs, plus time to ask questions in order to save you time and get started using the platform.

The focus of this session is the new Schedule feature for reserving Laboratory equipment, meeting rooms, or resources.

Speaker: Hannah A. Clark, Enterprise Client Services, LabArchives, LLC - Better Science

Register: https://labarchives.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEqf-mhpjgiHtF_fXyBdI3hydqEesqcRg6K

Lecture: Medinas of the Maghreb and the concept of Islamic city: Between texts and models.
Jan/25 Tue 05:00PM–06:30PM

On the question of an archetypal model of the Islamic city, several regional scholars and Orientalists have tried to give some answers, each focusing on a specific aspect to the originality of these cities. Some even expressed great skepticism toward the concept of "Islamic city" as an urban ideal of the Muslim world.

The purpose of this lecture is to confront various theoretical conceptions of this issue in order to trace morphological and landscape characteristics of Maghrebi medinas.


The lecture is intended for all audiences interested in the historical development of cities in the Maghreb or Islamic societies more broadly.  No prior knowledge is required. 

Speaker Biography: 
Amine Kasmi is a conservation architect and associate professor at the Department of Architecture, University of Tlemcen, Algeria. He teaches courses and conducts research in the history of urban design with a particular focus on the tensions between modern town planning and traditional urban fabric. His areas of interest also include the interaction between Islamic architecture and other architectures in the medieval Mediterranean world. He worked on numerous urban conservation sites in Algeria as well.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/MaghrebiMedinas 

Make your research computationally reproducible
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM

Open and reproducible research has become essential for scientific research. What do we mean by reproducible or replicable research? Why do you need to enhance the reproducibility of your work? What are some ways that you can make your own research computationally reproducible and shareable? This workshop will introduce a reproducible research pipeline that connects data collection, analysis, visualization, and presentation, using tools and platforms including R, Python, Docker, Binder, GitHub, Open Science Framework, and Zenodo.  Attendees will gain familiarity with principles, strategies and tools to document, manage and share your work to facilitate reproducible research. This workshop is appropriate for any researchers who are interested in applying these tools and strategies to their research

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/repro-20210127

Manage Your PDFs and Citations: Zotero & Mendeley
Jan/25 Tue 11:00AM–12:00PM

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll review Zotero and Mendeley and show how to use them together to help your manage your PDF’s and citations.

A Zoom invitation will be emailed to registered participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8742112

Managing Your Research Code
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–02:00PM

Do you write software in the course of your research? Have you been required by funders or publishers to share your code, or do you want to make it accessible to others to use? Documenting, sharing, and archiving your research software can make your research more transparent and reproducible, and can help you get credit for your work. This workshop will go over reasons to share your software, and will cover some best practices and considerations that will help you document your software and make it citable. We'll also go over options for archiving and publishing research software, including software papers and managing software with associated data sets, and some best practices for citing and documenting all of the software that you use.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/software_iap2022

NIH Data Management and Sharing Plans: What, Why, and What's Next
Jan/19 Wed 02:00PM–03:00PM

So, you want to write an NIH grant and need to know more about their new policy on Data Management & Sharing Plans (NOT-OD-21-013, effective 25Jan2023)? This session will highlight its key elements and changes, give an overview of the background and rationale of the new policy, and help you lay out a path for successfully meeting its expectations at MIT. This workshop will be over Zoom and the link will be emailed to participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8612296

Quick and Dirty Data Management: the 5 things you need to be doing now
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–11:00AM

Do you have data? (Who doesn't?!) Learn about the five basic things you can do now to manage your data for future happiness. These tools and techniques support practical data management and you can start using them immediately. Work with your personal data or research data, but start working now to ensure a future you who is secure in the existence, understandability, and reusability of your data!

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8612232

R for the true beginner
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–03:30PM

Heard of R but not sure what it does? Want to dive into it but not sure how to get started? In this session, we will go through the basics of R from what it is, when to use it, and how to perform simple tasks in the user-friendly RStudio interface. The workshop is geared towards people new to R with little to no programming experience. Attendees will be expected to download and install R and RStudio on their computers. Instructions will be provided to registrants ahead of the session.

Regsiter: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/Rbeginner_jan2022

Tools and tips for thesis authors
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

So it's time to write your thesis. What do you need to know about the process? What tools and experts are out there to help? This session will cover the required specifications for submitting your thesis, writing with the Overleaf LaTeX thesis template, ways to approach your literature review section, tools for organizing your literature, and options for managing and sharing related data and code. We'll review some common copyright questions related to theses, including whether you need permission to use certain figures in your thesis, and what is involved when you want to publish parts of your thesis before or after the thesis is submitted.

This session is appropriate for anyone who is planning to write a thesis or is currently writing a thesis at MIT. 

Registration is limited to current MIT affiliates.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/thesis_iap2022

Using Search Tools for Market Research
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–02:30PM

When conducting research related to intellectual property, especially in the areas of patents and market research, there are some tools that you should keep in mind. 
In this session, Nick Albaugh, Management and Social Sciences Librarian for Innovation & Entrepreneurship from MIT Libraries, will explain the best tools to use as well as share more about:

  • How to conduct a preliminary patent search using subscription-based and freely available tools
  • How to find the most relevant market research using specialized resources
  • How patent searching can inform market research and vice versa
Writing better READMEs: mini workshop
Jan/12 Wed 11:00AM–11:30AM

README files are standard for software, but they provide useful basic documentation for datasets as well. Get up to speed on efficiently writing useful README files for datasets and software in this short class. We'll cover some common things you should include in these files, as well as how to provide a citation to ensure you get credit for your hard work, and will share links to resources. Save yourself time and trouble -- if you are sharing data or software, you need READMEs! This workshop will be over Zoom and the link will be emailed to participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/readmes_iap2022