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"Grad Unified Theory" participates in the MIT Mystery Hunt
Jan/14 Fri 12:00PM

Are you interested in participating in the 2022 MIT Mystery Hunt (January 14, 2022 — January 17, 2022), but don’t currently have a team?  Ashdown House is hosting a team for this hunt, called “Grad Unified Theory”.  This Mystery Hunt will be held remotely, so people can puzzle from anywhere in the world.  (If you’re interested in learning more about Mystery Hunt in general, be sure to check out the official website: https://www.mitmh2022.com/)

For “Grad Unified Theory”, we will be (tentatively) having in-person puzzling in Ashdown House, as well as supporting remote puzzling through Discord and a collaboration server.  Sign up for the “Grad Unified Theory” team here: https://forms.gle/eMFkLq6yq9kbkjn79

(If you want to join a different team, sign up here as an unattached solver, and the Mystery Hunt admins can work with you to be added to a team: https://www.mitmh2022.com/register/solver.)

A Taste of Programming with SICP JS
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–12:00PM

With visiting professor Martin Henz. We can understand some computer programs in the way we solve math equations: by performing one simple algebraic step after another, until we reach an answer. This Independent Activity introduces programming in this way, inspired by the first chapter of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, JavaScript edition (SICP JS). We start from first principles, by looking at functions that you know from mathematics, but before long, you will program interesting graphics and sound patterns using the Source Academy, a website built for SICP JS. The Activity offers entertaining and thought-provoking insights into the essence of computation, and at the same time an introduction to programming using the popular programming language JavaScript.

Syllabus:

Day 1: The elements: See the basic ingredients of all computer programs
Day 2: A picture language: Program graphical patterns by wishful thinking
Day 3: Functions: Experience the magic of higher-order programming
Day 4: A curve language: Program fractals and three-dimensional curves with functions
Day 5: The lambda calculus: Explore the essence of computation
Day 6: Functional sound processing: Make some noise

For more details and to register see https://www.eecs.mit.edu/academics/iap-offerings/iap-2022/.

AI and Our Human Future
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–02:00PM

From health care, to transportation, to social media, the rapid adoption of artificial intelligence across many fields has transformed the economic and social structures of people’s daily lives. In doing so, AI not only has impacted our society in unforeseen ways, but is altering how we experience reality.

In this fireside chat, Daniel Huttenlocher and Eric Schmidt will sit down with moderator Asu Ozdaglar for a discussion on how AI is changing our relationship with knowledge and society and what this technology means for us all.

Speakers

  • Daniel Huttenlocher, Dean, MIT Schwarzman College of Computing
  • Eric Schmidt, Co-founder of Schmidt Futures and former CEO & Chairman of Google
  • Asu Ozdaglar, Deputy Dean of Academics for MIT Schwarzman College of Computing and Head of MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (moderator)

This event will be live streamed. Registrants will receive a confirmation email with access instructions prior to the event.

Activating a National Ecosystem for Manufacturing Advanced Functional Fibers and Fabrics
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–02:00PM

Recent breakthroughs in fiber and textile materials and manufacturing processes is enabling the transformation of traditional fibers, yarns and fabrics into highly sophisticated, integrated, and networked systems. Advanced Functional Fabrics of America (AFFOA), one of the 9 Department of Defense-sponsored Manufacturing USA Institutes, sits at the nexus of innovation of traditionally disparate fields – that of textiles and micro-electronics - facilitating transition of innovation across the manufacturing “valley of death” and bringing the commercialization of advanced functional fabric systems closer to reality. This presentation will include an overview of AFFOA’s advanced fabrics ecosystem, and specific examples on how the Institute facilitates the manufacturing evolution of selected functional fabric systems will be provided. Situated a short what from MIT Campus and founded by MIT innovators, AFFOA is excited about partnering with MIT faculty, staff, and students to transition their ideas from the lab into high-impact, commercial reality.

 

Register Now
MIT Kerb Required

Author Rights Workshop
Jan/20 Thu 03:00PM–04:30PM

When you publish in scholarly journals, you’re usually required to give up some rights in your work. In this seminar, MIT librarians Katharine Dunn and Katie Zimmerman will show you what to look for in author contracts and discuss ways to retain rights to share and reuse your work, including via MIT's open access policies.

 

Katharine Dunn is a scholarly communications librarian at MIT, helping researchers and students make their work more openly available.
Katie Zimmerman is the Director of Copyright Strategy for the MIT Libraries, helping the libraries and the MIT community make informed copyright decisions.

Basics of Copyrights, Data, and Software
Jan/14 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM

It has been said that content is king. Copyrighted works – whether media, software, or art – are a major portion of the world’s creative, intellectual, and economic output. As such, copyright issues affect musicians, artists, authors, and software programmers alike. 
 
This popular talk offers a fun and interesting look at the protection of your creative works of authorship whether developed in the lab at MIT or elsewhere.
 
Join Daniel Dardani, Technology Licensing Officer and intellectual property expert, for an overview of copyright law and consider its history, practice, and relevance to your world and to the MIT community.  Daniel will explore topics including: the nature of originality, fair use, open source, how copyrights can be licensed in the digital age, and others.

Basics of Fair Use
Jan/07 Fri 03:00PM–04:30PM

New things are built on what came before.  If your work uses copyrighted material, you should know about fair use.  What are your rights with regard to prior works?  What requires permission and what doesn’t?  This session will cover the basics of fair use for copyrighted works, so that you know your rights whether you are text mining the scientific literature, adapting a song, or sharing an image you found online. 

Basics of Obtaining a Patent
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:30PM

The issuance of a patent is often seen as an inventor's most notable achievement, but do you know what it takes to apply for and be issued a patent? This session will review the criteria required and the process by which inventions are assessed by the USPTO to determine if creative works are patentable.
 
Jonathan Hromi, Associate Director, IP, Laura Lapsley, Senior IP Paralegal, and Caitlyn Ward, Technology Licensing Associate, all of the MIT Technology Licensing Office (TLO), will discuss the basics of the patent application process, the history and context surrounding patents as a means of protecting commercialization rights, as well as share about the policy and practice of MIT's patenting activities. They'll share insights into how the TLO engages in this process in support of entrepreneurial engagement at MIT.

CANCELED: IAP - LCE Language Conversation Cafe
Jan/20 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM

Join us to meet other language enthusiasts, language learners, and native speakers of languages you’d like to practice. This is a great way to find a language partner! We are going to play games in different languages. 

Brought to you by the Language Conversation Exchange. Our program is open to MIT community members only.

Commercialization of MIT Technology
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

Have you ever wondered how technology that’s developed in universities and other academic institutions gets translated into a product to benefit the public? This process is known as technology transfer, and research organizations all over the world utilize teams of tech transfer professionals to evaluate new inventions, protect intellectual property through a patenting process, and license the technology to third parties, such as start-up companies or corporations, for further investment in development and commercialization.

At MIT, the Technology Licensing Office (TLO) supports MIT inventors throughout this process and plays a vital role in the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

You'll hear from Technology Licensing Officers Lauren C. Foster and Deirdre Zammit and learn the strategic approach MIT takes to move innovations from the research bench to the marketplace.

Conflict of Interest and Startups at MIT
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

MIT’s sponsored research exceeds $750M annually, with funding received from federal agencies, private foundations, and industry. MIT also has a global reputation for its startup, innovation, and entrepreneurial culture with 30+ startups launched annually in collaboration with the MIT Technology Licensing Office (TLO).
 
This seminar is designed to build your financial conflict of interest (fCOI) knowledge base by presenting the history and evolution of the financial conflict of interest in research regulations, providing an overview of the COI process at MIT, and outlining the benefits of a collaborative process with the TLO.
 
Rupinder Grewal, MIT COI Officer, and Linda Chao, Technology Licensing Officer, will provide historical context and insight into topics, including the discussion of these and other questions:
 

  • Given the financial drivers of the for-profit world, how does MIT ensure that objectivity is maintained in its fundamental research activities? 
  • How does MIT protect research results from influence when an Investigator has outside financial interests?
  • What kinds of fCOI situations arise in our environment and how do we manage them?
  • How do researchers navigate potential COI issues in startup activities?
Developing Industry-Sponsored Research Agreements
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

Are you interested in following an academic research career solving challenging problems across the globe? Industry sponsors around the world can be a rich source of scientific problems and funding for your academic research at MIT or elsewhere. But, have you wondered how to go about securing funding and an agreement? Or, have you found it challenging to get a sponsored research agreement in place?

 

Our talk will introduce you to key concepts and policies that are involved in developing an agreement with your sponsor. We will explore topics including: technology readiness level (TLR), statement of research work, confidentiality, background/foreground IP, and much more in relation to agreements. Understanding these policies will help smoothen the process at MIT (and elsewhere) and shorten the time to secure an agreement with your industry sponsor.

About the speakers:

Grace Leung joined OSATT in March of 2020. As a Catalyst, Grace works with MIT researchers in engaging with industrial sponsors and collaborators, negotiates the appropriate agreements, and establishes major research alliances. Prior to joining MIT, Grace held positions in technology licensing and business development at Mass General Brigham and Harvard University. She led negotiations and executed early-stage technology licenses and industrial sponsored research agreements, and established intellectual property protection and marketing strategies of life-science innovations. Grace holds a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology and Microbiology from Tufts Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

Michael Leskiw is an Alliance Manager in MIT’s Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer (OSATT). Michael’s portfolio extends to international engagements with foreign governments, as well as several high-visibility major agreements with multi-national corporations. Michael has been at MIT since 2004 and previously worked in MIT’s sponsored programs office, and prior to that on the operational side ramping up MIT’s largest international research center (based in Singapore) and a collaborative project helping to start a new university in Moscow. Michael is a licensed attorney in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Subarna Basnet PhD, is a Catalyst at Office of Strategic Alliance and Technology Transfer (OSATT), and an expert in technology & design innovation. Previously, as the Director for Design Science, Technology, and Innovation at the MIT International Design Center (IDC), he led efforts in developing research and educational programs for the Center. Prior to MIT, Subarna served in the industry (Bose, Xerox, Softech) for over 20 years, contributing in diverse areas, ranging from research, design and development, manufacturing, and sales. Subarna holds a PhD from MIT in Mechanical Engineering.

Leah Keating is a Senior Strategic Transactions Officer and OSATT’s RAS Liaison. Leah’s responsibilities include supporting and improving coordination between RAS and the OSATT Strategic Transactions Team, as well as negotiating and reviewing research and other sponsored agreements of all kinds. She works closely with teams in RAS and OSATT to support interoffice and inter-team communications and operations, and on developing new or improved agreement workflows. Prior to MIT, Leah was the Director of Research Administration for Harvard Law School for 4 years, where she managed all operations of HLS research administration. efore joining HLS, she was the Associate Director for Technology Transactions for the Office of Technology Development (OTD) at Harvard. At OTD, Leah worked closely with the Office of Sponsored Programs, the sponsored research administration offices for Harvard Medical School. Leah holds a B.A. in French from Hamilton College and a J.D. from Suffolk University Law School.

 

Register Now
 

Do Right by Your Research Data
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM

Congratulations—you’ve got research data! This session will walk you through the dos and don’ts associated with research data and artifacts, all of those associated bits of information necessary to understand research data. These can include structured data, images, unstructured data, metadata, analysis scripts, analysis environment, and much more. We’ll cover the tools and resources available to you for making decisions about your research data (and associated bits) with regard to use agreements, security requirements, and copyright and licensing. We’ll also explore some case studies and do a practical applications exercise.

 

Amy Nurnberger is the Program Head for Data Management Services at MIT libraries. Amy also serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Learning Analytics program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Within the broader research data community, Amy is a co-chair of the Research Data Alliance (RDA)/World Data Services Publishing Data Workflows Working Group and the RDA Education and Training on Handling Research Data Interest Group, and she is the elected co-chair of the RDA Organizational Advisory Board. She also sits on the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee and the editorial board of Patterns - The Science of Data.

Emergency Preparedness for Your Home
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:00PM

People and families that plan for emergencies will:

  • Help keep people safe;
  • Limit property damage;
  • Know what to do during and after a disaster;
  • Better manage their savings;
  • Support community preparedness; and
  • Help their community get back up and running after a disaster.

Taking simple actions to protect against disaster helps you, your family, your community, and your country in important ways.  This training will help guide you through the initial stages for developing your own resposne plans for your home and loved ones.

Eye on A.I.: Decoding the Bias
Jan/25 Tue 07:00PM–08:30PM

Sasha Costanza-Chock, Shalini Kantayya, Safiya Noble and Kishawna Peck speak with Ethan Zuckerman to discuss biases, equity, transparency, and governance as they  relate to machine learning.  

In the 2020 film Coded Bias, filmmaker Shalini Kantayya explores the fallout of MIT Media Lab researcher Joy Buolamwini’s discovery that facial recognition does not see dark-skinned faces accurately, and her journey to push for the first-ever legislation in the U.S. to govern against bias in the algorithms that impact us all.

In this panel discussion, leading experts working in the field of machine learning discuss the underlying prejudices embedded in computer code and how we might unravel these predispositions and ensure all humans are treated equally by both human and machine.  The discussion will focus on racial and gender biases in artificial intelligence (A.I.) and how it affects our day to day living. 

Registration is required.  

As a component of the program, we encourage participants to view Coded Bias.  The film is available to current MIT community members here; it is also available to members of the general public on Netflix.  

The MIT Libraries is committed to accessibility.  Please email us if you would like to request accommodation to participate in this program.  Please let us know as far in advance as possible and we will do our best to meet your request. 

This event is presented in collaboration with the Toronto Public Library and is part of TPL's On Civil Society series.

IAP - Decoding Happiness
Jan/18 Tue 11:00AM–12:00PM

While everyone seeks happiness seldom does one find true happiness. 

Modern cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience still find it hard to explain the complete science of happiness. In a world where various companies and advertisements create hope for people to find happiness in their products, happiness is seldom found in those products, while even if found it is short-lived. In such a scenario, it is imperative for a man of intelligence to explore the science of happiness and how to find true happiness. 

Why each individual has a different degree of happiness? Why aren't we happy always to the highest degree? Is there a science to understand happiness? Is there a set of principles that would help us improve the quality and extent of happiness? If these are some of the questions that bother you, join us for a unique enlivening session to explore the timeless Vedic understanding of happiness.

When: 11 am, Tuesday, Jan 18, 2022

RSVP: tinyurl.com/mithappiness

IAP - Yoga Sutras 101
Jan/17 Mon 11:00AM–12:00PM

Yoga Sutras 101 introduces fundamental concepts of yoga principles. This is an introductory workshop is based on Patanjali's Yoga Sutras. This practical class presents the fundamental concepts of yoga, the various yoga paths, and practical insights on how to practice yoga. This workshop would also highlight some of the misconceptions of modern yoga systems and how to avoid common pitfalls in practicing yoga. 

Students will be able to learn simple, practical, and effective yoga techniques which can be applied in one's daily living. Join us to deepen your yoga practice and lead a life of joy, peace, and good health. This workshop is offered by the Vaishnava Hindu Chaplain at MIT, Sadananda Dasa, who has been a yoga practitioner for more than a decade.  

When: 11 am, Monday, Jan 17, 2022

RSVP: tinyurl.com/mityogasutras

IAP 2022: Mission Innovation Program—Dual-use Ventures: Navigating Both Commercial & Defense Markets
Jan/19 Wed 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:00AM–05:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM–05:00PM

Program Description

The Dual-use Ventures non-credit IAP course helps technology startups navigate early-stage challenges in market research, use cases, and federal funding opportunities. We provide insights into navigating SBIRs, STTRs, and other federal funding opportunities while working within the commercial marketplace so that tech founders - when thoughtful and working rigorously - can take their Minimum Viable Product from $0 in revenue to $1,500,000 in defense contracts over the course of 24 months. This program is intentional about instruction and training - our eminent goal is to help MIT-affiliated lab-based tech startups traverse the trough of disillusionment and commercialize tough tech products for the betterment of humankind. 

This course is for students, alumni, and ecosystem members who want to learn useful and actionable steps to create dual-use ventures (DuV). A dual-use venture is one that has both government and commercial (enterprise and/or consumer) customers. We’ll discuss frameworks, funding opportunities, entrepreneur roadmaps, and government resources. Topics in this course are particularly relevant to technology entrepreneurs interested in learning more about working with the Department of Defense.

MIT strives to enable higher levels of diversity and inclusion in the innovation ecosystem. Research shows that diversity is a key factor for innovation, helping unearth inherent biases in technological solutions, enabling teams to make better decisions, and driving stronger performance. We strongly encourage members of traditionally marginalized communities to participate in this course.

This series offers presentations over zoom from MIT and government speakers, a networking event, and plenty of opportunities to ask questions on topics we have found tech startups are most interested in learning more about.

                                             REGISTER

Course Thesis

Startups can be purposeful about designing their company to be ready to pursue both commercial and defense markets. This requires being informed, prepared, diligent, and ready when either market opportunity becomes available.

Key Outcomes

  • Learn about non-dilutive funding opportunities, nuances of the defense and dual-use markets, and stakeholders in the defense acquisitions system
  • Understand the need to move opportunistically across both commercial and defense markets in the early stages of ventures
  • Learn how government data rights interact with a dual-use venture’s commercially oriented IP strategy
  • Gain insights on how to protect the long-term value of your technology for both commercial and government markets
  • Achieve an actionable understanding of DOD contractual requirements for cybersecurity and information protection

Schedule
(updated regularly & subject to change)

Day 1 | Wednesday, January 19, 2022 | Dual-use, broadly…

Day 2 | Thursday, January 20, 2022 | My tech startup has a call with the military…

 Day 3 | Friday, January 21, 2022 | Startup funding pinball…

 

                                             REGISTER

SPEAKERS

IAP: How to Become a Personal Trainer or Group Exercise Instructor
Jan/19 Wed 05:30PM–06:30PM

Meet virtually with MIT Recreation's Assistant Fitness Directors to learn how to become a nationally certified Personal Fitness Trainer or Group Exercise Instructor! This event is free, and all are welcome. Registration is required to receive the Zoom Recording and Powerpoint. Zoom link will be sent the morning of the session. Come prepared to learn and move through a 15 minute exercise demonstration.

Credentials:
Josie Wielinski: ACE Personal Trainer, Registered Dietitian, Crossfit/Cycle Certified, Red Cross CPR Instructor Certified
Emily Lin: AFAA Group Exercise/Cycle/Yoga/Personal Trainer Certified, Barre Above Certified, Red Cross CPR Instructor Certified

Registration opens 12/6/21 at this link: https://mit.clubautomation.com/calendar/event-info?id=31618&style=0&isFrame=0  It is free to make a guest account. Email fitness@mit.edu with any questions. 

IAP: How to explain fusion energy to anyone
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:00PM

Offered by children's book author Kathryn Hulick.

Fusion energy is complicated. It involves ionized gases, superconducting magnets, tritium breeding, and more. Although the science behind all of this is indeed complex, it's also exciting. With some creativity and enthusiasm, you can explain fusion energy in a way that anybody can understand. That's exactly what Kathryn Hulick did in her new book for kids and teens, Welcome to the Future: Robot Friends, Fusion Energy, Pet Dinosaurs, and More. The book explains how ten different technologies could transform the world in the future. It also challenges readers to think about how they want the world to change. In this talk, she'll read from her chapter about fusion energy. She'll explain how she approached researching and writing about this subject, including how she decided what to include and what to leave out. She'll offer tips on how to explain scientific research to journalists, students, or the public in a way that makes eyes light up and mental gears spin. Fusion energy isn't JUST complicated -- it's also fun. 

Bio: Kathryn Hulick is the author of two books for teens, Welcome to the Future: Robot Friends, Fusion Energy, Pet Dinosaurs, and More (Quarto, 2021), about how technology could change the world in the future, and Strange But True: 10 of the World's Greatest Mysteries Explained (Quarto, 2019), about the science and history of ghosts, aliens, and other mysterious things. As a freelance science journalist, she regularly contributes to Science News for Students, Muse magazine, and Front Vision, a Chinese-language science magazine for young people.  Hulick’s favorite part of writing about science is getting to speak with researchers in many different fields. Once, she spoke with an expert on parallel universes while he was shoveling snow from his driveway. Another time, she called a biologist who was out in the field in Africa, watching a herd of elephants. In addition to writing, she enjoys hiking, gardening, painting and reading. Hulick lives in Massachusetts with her husband, son and dog. Her website is http://kathrynhulick.com/ You can follow her on Twitter @khulick or on Instagram or TikTok @kathryn_hulick

IAP: Recent exciting fusion results in ICF: how MIT-PSFC contributed
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:00AM

Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have achieved a record 1.3 megajoule energy output substantially exceeding, for the first time, the energy absorbed by the fuel that was used to initiate the fusion process. Learn about these exciting results and how the Plasma Science and Fusion Center's High-Energy-Density Physics division contributed to this success.

Speakers: Patrick Adrian and Neel Kabadi, MIT PSFC

IAP: Studying the stuff of stars in the lab
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:00AM

Instabilities in the Crab Nebula jet; magnetic reconnection in the magnetopause; collisionless shocks in the universe, caused by supersonic plasma flows. These are just some of the astrophysical events  being studied at the PSFC using high-energy-density plasmas generated by laser facilities. Learn more about these phenomena and the laser facilities that support MIT's astrophysical research.

Laboratory astrophysics: Studying the stuff of stars in the lab
Speakers: Tim Johnson and Jacob Pearcy, PSFC

IAP: The SPARC tokamak: Predicting performance in the world's first burning plasma
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–03:00PM

Speaker: Nathan Howard

The SPARC tokamak is scheduled to begin operation in 2025 and will later become the first tokamak to achieve burning plasma conditions.  Its success will pave the way to the realization of fusion as an energy source.   In this talk we will cover the need for fusion energy development and the high field path to fusion.  In particular, we will present a historical overview of the models used to predict tokamak performance and will highlight some of the cutting-edge work going on at MIT that has been used to predict SPARC and increase our confidence in SPARC’s success.

For Zoom link contact: info@psfc.mit.edu

IAP: The early 2022 fusion energy start-up landscape
Jan/27 Thu 11:00AM–12:00PM

Speaker: Sam Wurzel, Technology to Market Advisor, ARPA-E, U.S. Department of Energy

Over the past five years the number of fusion energy startups has doubled and private funding going to fusion companies has grown by a much larger factor. This talk will provide an overview of the fusion energy startup landscape, a discussion of their various approaches to fusion energy, and the historical context. For Zoom link contact: info@psfc.mit.edu 

IAP: The long road to 20 tesla on the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil: A magnet origin story
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM

The long road to 20 tesla on the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil: A magnet origin story

Speaker: Zach Hartwig

In the early morning hours of September 5 2021, the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC), a joint project of the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Commonwealth Fusion Systems, achieved a peak magnetic field in excess of 20 tesla. This moment ushered in a new era of powerful high-field superconducting magnets for science and industrial applications and enabled a long-sought paradigm shift in fusion energy towards smaller, lower cost devices. But how did this come to be? What technologies and pioneers set the stage for the TFMC? How was it possible to execute a project of this scale and innovation in only two years? And why did this happen at MIT and not somewhere else? To answer these questions, this talk will attempt to map the century-long odyssey at MIT in high-field magnet research, development, and operations that laid the foundation for the success of the TFMC Project and then, with the technical and historical context firmly established, provide a more meaningful overview of the TFMC Project itself.

IDEAS Social Innovation Challenge Virtual Proposal Writing Workshop
Jan/12 Wed 12:30PM–02:00PM

Do you have an idea addressing social and environmental challenges of our day? Then, join the IDEAS Social Innovation Challenge proposal writing workshop to help you formulate a proposal that you can submit to the annual challenge by the deadline on Wednesday, January 19, 2022 6 PM EST. 

IP Ownership @ MIT
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:30PM

Like many US Universities, the Institute owns intellectual property that is created during research at MIT. Having a clear understanding of the what, why, and implications of this Policy is paramount. Allison Madden, IPIA Assistant at the MIT Technology Licensing Office, will discuss these items as well as the following:

  • What does it mean for MIT to own intellectual property? 
  • What are the implications of signing the Inventions and Proprietary Information Agreement (IPIA)? 
  • How does this impact entrepreneurship and innovation at MIT?

 
This seminar offers an overview of intellectual property policy and processes at MIT and its implications for researchers contributing to discovery through MIT intellectual endeavors. Geared towards principal investigators, students, and other potential inventors.

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part I)
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers better understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  tech? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current trends that may relate to changing how we write laws regulating new tech?

On the Crypto side, emphasis will be on the examples of NFTs in the music industry, and lessons learned on how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the legal framework of a value exchange system that is built on reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers to inclusivity without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states to emerging  technologies such as bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does ones freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand? These questions and others will be covered by:

  a panel group, including: hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- in Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part II)
Jan/28 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  fields? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current changing trends in  how we write tech laws?

On the Crypto side, we will present the exaple of NFTs in the music industry, asking how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the framework of a value exchange system that is built on inlcusivity, reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers -without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states (osmodata)  to emerging technologies such as  bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does one's freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand?

Andreas and Dimitri will be joined by a panel group, including, hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Is it in the Public Domain?
Jan/21 Fri 03:00PM–04:00PM

Explore the public domain in this seminar. When does copyright expire, and how do you know when something is free to use? Katie Zimmerman, Director of Copyright Strategy for MIT Libraries, will discuss the public domain and attendees will put their newly learned skills to use on historical materials from the MIT Libraries.

Learning through Doing: MIT TLO Internship
Jan/05 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

Are you interested in the world of Technology Transfer, but unsure of what it is or how to get involved. Join Angela Park, previous TLO Marketing Intern and Robyn Bunch, Marketing & Communications Manager, give an overview of the Technology Licensing Office and how the Marketing Internship Program can help you explore your tech transfer interests. 

MIT Bluewater Sailing Informational Session
Jan/20 Thu 07:00PM–08:00PM

MIT Sailing would love for you to join us aboard our museum quality 51' Herreshoff sailboat in Boston Harbor.  Bluewater Sailing is under the supervision of MIT Sailing and their volunteer instructors; the program operates in Boston Harbor on a bigger boat with more teamwork, longer trips and more immersion in the ocean.  This virtual informational session is for those who are new to big boat sailing at MIT and guide you through how to get a sailing card, sign up for a bluewater sail, and what to expect when you climb aboard.  The bluewater program is focused on increasing the exposure of the MIT community to big boat sailing.  For those with sailing experience who are interested in progressing their knowledge, racing, or leading sailing trips, we will discuss the process for earning a bluewater crew and skipper rating towards the end of the session. 

More information about the program and email list signup will be available at http://sailing.mit.edu/bluewater/ 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://mit.zoom.us/j/97839877502

MIT Bluewater Sailing: Cruising, Racing, and Relaxing
Jan/24 Mon 07:00PM–08:00PM

Want to learn more about bluewater sailing at MIT? Come hear stories about different adventures ranging from cruising to racing from Boston to Maine and beyond. 

 

More information about the program and email list signup will be available at http://sailing.mit.edu/bluewater/ 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://mit.zoom.us/j/97839877502

 

MIT Mystery Hunt
Jan/14 Fri 11:59AM

More information at http://puzzles.mit.edu/!

The MIT Mystery Hunt is a puzzlehunt competition that takes place on the MIT campus every year during the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day weekend. The hunt challenges each participating team to solve a large number of puzzles which lead to an object (called a "coin") hidden somewhere on campus. The winning team gets to write the subsequent year's hunt.

Mystery Hunt was launched in 1981 and is widely regarded as one of the oldest and most complex puzzlehunts in the world. It attracts more than 2,000 people every year and has inspired similar competitions at universities, companies and cities around the world.

Mycotecture, BioHab, MycoHab and Regenerative Food, Medicine, Materials: A surprisingly digital (r)evolution in agriculture and construction
Jan/28 Fri 12:15PM–03:00PM

Online only with interactive live video of mycotecture techniques.

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, hosts key doers in the mycotecture regenerative agriculture and construction materials industries in a series of short presentations and panel Q&A followed by hands-on, live and interactive demonstration of mycotecture techniques by Chris Maurer, via video link to redhouse studios in Cleveland, OH.

Using the exemplar of the BioHab, a joint MIT-SBG-redhouse project currently being deployed in Namibia, architect and founder of redhouse studio Chris Maurer will explain working mycelium methods to reform agriwaste leveraging inflatables to create superior new “bioterials”, self-reproducing buildings, edible and medicinal mushrooms all in one process. Carolyn Cameron-Kirksmith, head of Group Strategic Development of Standard Bank Group and BioHAB will cover Africa’s largest bank continued investment in mco-R&D as well as entrepreneurial deployment directly to market after establishing growing mushrooms operations at BioHab Namibia. We will cover blockchain technologies aiming at accurately tracking product quality and provenance and discuss monetizing carbon sequestration and land stewardship. 

Zoom linkhttps://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148

Links to additional materials:
www.bio-hab.org
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L0EgAVwZbM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG5fe7AfaPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9ovt4QaprE&t=422s

Patent (and Other) Protection Available for Artificial Intelligence (AI) Related Inventions
Jan/07 Fri 01:30PM–03:00PM

Join Ben and Dan of the MIT TLO to learn about Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the challenges and alternatives to patenting AI. They will also walk you though examples of AI patents and helps answer the question of "Who is the Inventor?"

 

Ben joined MIT’s Technology Licensing Office as their TLO for Medical Devices 7 years ago following a 30-year career leading product development teams bringing to market new technologies in electronic imaging, medical devices, life sciences instrumentation, and drug development.  His experience spans both large companies and medical device/therapeutic startups.  He holds a B.A. in physics from Carleton College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Cornell University.

Daniel Dardani is a Technology Licensing Officer at the MIT TLO with 18 years of experience managing a large and sophisticated portfolio of computer and software technologies including algorithms, digital imaging, video games, machine learning/AI, and cybertech innovations. Dan has negotiated countless license agreements with companies large and small. Dan is a Certified Licensing ProfessionalTM; is a teaching fellow at Harvard University’s Summer School, and is quick to lend his expertise serving on professional committees and advisory boards in the areas of software, licensing, and intellectual property.

Restorative Justice: ICEO Community Dialogues
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM
Transforming Communities, Classrooms and Conflict
 
Restorative justice challenges us to hold ourselves and our communities accountable to cultivating and maintaining the relationships and systems that deeply center our humanity and align with our core values. How can restorative practices be used to not only address interpersonal harm but transform the ways in which we live, work and learn together in service of a more just and equitable society?
 
In this interactive presentation and discussion, participants will be introduced to the indigenous origins and core tenants of restorative justice; its contemporary practices and applications on college campuses, and how it can help us realize our vision for equity, inclusion and belonging. 
 
The session will be led by Nina Harris, Restorative Resolutions Coordinator (Institute Discrimination Harassment & Response).
 
Starr Forum: The Russian-Ukrainian Conflict: A prologue to WWIII or another frozen conflict?
Jan/28 Fri 10:30AM–11:30AM

Please register for this Zoom event at https://bit.ly/Russian-UkrainianConflict

Featuring:

Dmitry Gorenburg is a senior research scientist at CNA, where he has worked since 2000. Dr. Gorenburg is an associate at the Harvard University Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His research interests include security issues in the former Soviet Union, Russian military reform, Russian foreign policy, and ethnic politics and identity.

Olga Oliker is the program director for Europe and Central Asia at the International Crisis Group. Her research interests include foreign and security policies of Russia, Ukraine, and the Central Asian and Caucasian successor states to the Soviet Union, domestic politics in these countries, US policy towards the region, and nuclear weapon strategy and arms control. She received her PhD from the MIT Department of Political Science.

Serhii Plokhii is the Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History and director of the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University.  His research interests include the intellectual, cultural, and international history of Eastern Europe, with an emphasis on Ukraine.

Carol Saivetz is a senior advisor in the MIT Security Studies Program. She is a research associate at Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Dr Saivetz is the author and contributing co-editor of books and articles on Soviet and now Russian foreign policy issues, including an assessment of the “reset,” Russian policies toward the other Soviet successor states, and current US-Russian relations.

Elizabeth Wood is professor of history at MIT. She is the author most recently of Roots of Russia’s War in Ukraine (Woodrow Wilson Center and Columbia University Press, 2016). She is co-director of the MIT Russia Program, coordinator of Russian studies, and adviser to the Russian Language Program. 

 

A session of the Focus on Russia Lecture Series.

Co-sponsors:  MIT Center for International Studies (CIS), MIT Security Studies Program (SSP), MISTI MIT-Russia

 

Event Poster

View Poster | Watch Video | View Transcript

Free & open to the public 
Also watch it on YouTube.

MIT is committed to providing an environment that is accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you need a disability related accommodation to attend or have other questions, please contact us at starrforum@mit.edu.

Sign up for Starr Forum emails to get notified about upcoming events.

A full listing of Starr Forums is available here

Summer Internships with Coding it Forward - info session
Jan/06 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Looking for a meaningful tech internship for next summer?

Want to innovate at the intersection of tech and public service?

Join the PKG Center and Coding it Forward to learn about paid tech internships in government in the US. 

 

On Zoom - RSVP to get the Zoom link

Thursday, January 6th, noon ET

 

In 2017, a group of Boston-area technology students found themselves frustrated by the lack of mission-driven technical internships - so they decided to do something about it! Today, Coding it Forward offers paid internships for innovative technology students to work with federal, state, and local government offices. Applications for the summer programs open in January.

 

  • As a Civic Digital Fellow, you can spend the summer deepening your understanding of the technology behind federal government services and applying your skills to develop solutions that will serve everyday Americans.
  • Or, apply to the Civic Innovation Corps for the opportunity to collaborate with a host office at the state or local level to make government more effective and efficient for all.

 

Hear from MIT students who’ve participated recently and bring your questions for Coding it Forward’s Deputy Director, Ariana Soto.

Sustainability and Climate Change
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM–04:00PM

Operations Research Center IAP Seminar 2022Operations Research is a powerful area for applications involving energy process design, waste minimization, climate change mitigation, scarce resources management, and other problems related to creating more sustainable and environmentally responsible operations. In this seminar, we will engage with a wide range of researchers and practitioners tackling these and other topics via data science, optimization, and other contemporary OR methods.

Technology Transfer at Lincoln Laboratory
Jan/12 Wed 11:30AM–01:00PM

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is a Federally Funded Research and Development Center, run by MIT to develop advanced technology in support of national security. For close to 70 years, the Lincoln Laboratory has been developing critical technologies in areas as diverse as radar systems, satellite platforms and payloads, artificial intelligence, quantum information sciences, and synthetic biology, to name a few.
 
Historically, the Laboratory builds prototypes and transitions that know-how to government sponsors and their industry contractors. For technologies that may also be useful to the civilian sector (so called dual-use), commercialization and open-source distribution are pathways for knowledge sharing. But how and to whom to transfer technologies is not always obvious and engineers are seldom trained as entrepreneurs. 
 
Join Lou Bellaire, Deputy Technology Ventures Officer at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, as he discusses the factors that influence technology transfer from a national laboratory perspective. She is equally interested in your ideas on how to ensure that federally funded research supports economic gains and social well-being on a grand scale.

The Engine: How we Support "Tough Tech" Startups and Make Investment Decisions
Jan/05 Wed 01:00PM–02:30PM

The Engine, built by MIT, is a venture capital firm that invests into "Tough Tech" companies and that provides a variety of services and facilities to those companies and to the greater "tough tech" ecosystem.  This session will cover our approach to investments and how we support companies.

Reed is a General Partner on the investment team at The Engine. He serves as a Board Member for Celestial AI, Hyperlight, Rise Robotics, C2Sense, The Routing Company, Cambridge Electronics, and Emvolon.  Reed was a founder and Managing Director at Project 11 Ventures and Techstars Boston. He attended MIT and has a background in software. He ran Microsoft Startup Labs in Cambridge and was VP of Technology at Idealab, Boston. Early in his career he created Freelance Graphics which was acquired by Lotus Development Corp. He has been a lecturer at MIT Sloan and is a frequent speaker at MIT entrepreneurship courses and programs.

The Future is Flexible: MLK Scholar Kristen Dorsey
Jan/27 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

MLK Visiting Scholar Kristen Dorsey talks about developments in soft mechanical sensors, 3D printed textiles, and more; the need for culture change in academic to support a more diverse generation of engineers.

Three Creative Techniques for Solving Open-Ended Challenges
Jan/12 Wed 02:30PM–03:30PM

In this virtual workshop (IAP, not for credit) open to MIT undergraduate students of all majors, you will practice and apply three creative techniques for solving open-ended challenges in any field. All participants will tackle the same challenge and generate creative ideas for solving it.

Following the ideation activity, participants will vote anonymously on the best idea generated by each technique. Participants with the top scoring idea for each technique will each receive $40 in TechCash.

The workshop will be conducted by two experts on thinking skills in science and engineering education: Dr. Rea Lavi, Lecturer and Curriculum Designer for the NEET undergraduate program at MIT School of Engineering, and Dr. Deniz Marti, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Learning Incubator at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

You do not need to register to the workshop, just join via zoom (MIT Touchstone login): https://mit.zoom.us/j/95869719648

To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

At the end of the workshop, Dr. Lavi will briefly introduce his new spring class, open to all majors, where first-year students and sophomores will practice and apply a wide variety of problem-solving methods and techniques to real-world challenges in climate and sustainability. 

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop!

Rea Lavi and Deniz Marti

Three Creative Techniques for Solving Open-Ended Challenges
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–03:30PM

Apply creative techniques and win prizes! In this virtual workshop (IAP, not for credit) open to MIT undergraduate students of all majors, you will practice and apply three creative techniques for solving open-ended challenges in any field. All participants will tackle the same challenge and generate creative ideas for solving it.

Following the ideation activity, participants will vote anonymously on the best idea generated by each technique. Participants with the top scoring idea for each technique will each receive $60 in TechCash.

The workshop will be conducted by two experts on thinking skills in science and engineering education: Dr. Rea Lavi, Lecturer and Curriculum Designer for the NEET undergraduate program at MIT School of Engineering, and Dr. Deniz Marti, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Learning Incubator at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

You do not need to register to the workshop, just join via zoom (MIT Touchstone login): https://mit.zoom.us/j/95112800490

To receive a calendar invite to the event and an email reminder 24hrs before the event, click here.

At the end of the workshop, Dr. Lavi will briefly introduce his new spring course, open to all majors, where first-year students and sophomores will practice and apply a wide variety of problem-solving methods and techniques to real-world challenges in climate and sustainability. You can view the course syllabus here.

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop!

Drs. Rea Lavi and Deniz Marti realavi@mit.edu

UNBOXING RELIGION: Christian History: A Quick Trip Through 2,000 Years
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–03:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Christian History: A Quick Trip Through 2,000 Years

Fr. Michael Medas (Catholic Chaplain), Pastor Andrew Heisen (Lutheran Chaplain) and Deacon James Wilcox (Saint Mary Orthodox Church, Cambridge)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Jews and Judaism 101
Jan/26 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

 

Jews and Judaism 101

Rabbi Menachem Altein (Jewish Chaplain, Chabad)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: The Bahá’í Faith
Jan/27 Thu 07:00PM–08:30PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

The Bahá’í Faith

Brian Aull (Bahá’í Chaplain)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Understanding Hinduism
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–03:00PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Understanding Hinduism

Swami Tyagananda (Hindu Chaplain)

Registration Link

UNBOXING RELIGION: Understanding Islam and Muslims
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–05:30PM

In this series of virtual classes, ORSEL chaplains and guests will introduce you to the world’s religious traditions. Attend one session, or as many as you like.

Learn about the diversity of human beings -- the questions they ask and the answers they find. Better understand history and current events. And get to know your neighbors in a new way.

Understanding Islam and Muslims

Sister Nada El-Alami (Muslim Chaplain)

Registration Link

(also offered: Thurs. 1/13 12:00-1:30 and Tues. 1/18 2:00-3:30)

Understanding Islam and Muslims
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:30PM

Islam is frequently talked about in the media, but continues to be a mystery to most people. What is the Muslim's concept of God? The afterlife? Who was prophet Muhammad? What do Muslims say about Abraham, Moses, and Jesus? What are the core beliefs and practices of Islam? This session offers an opportunity to get to know our Muslim students a little bit better, see beyond common misconceptions, and learn from Muslims about their fourteen-century old faith, professed by 1.8 billion people worldwide. This is a 90 minute interactive workshop with participation from students and time allotted for Q&A. 

Understanding Islam and Muslims
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:30PM
Jan/18 Tue 02:00PM–03:30PM
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–05:30PM

Islam is frequently talked about in the media, but continues to be a mystery to most people. What is the Muslim's concept of God? The afterlife? Who was prophet Muhammad? What do Muslims say about Abraham, Moses, and Jesus? What are the core beliefs and practices of Islam? This session offers an opportunity to get to know our Muslim students a little bit better, see beyond common misconceptions, and learn from Muslims about their fourteen-century old faith, professed by 1.8 billion people worldwide. This is a 90 minute interactive workshop with participation from students and time allotted for Q&A. 

Using Search Tools for Market Research
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–02:30PM

When conducting research related to intellectual property, especially in the areas of patents and market research, there are some tools that you should keep in mind. 
In this session, Nick Albaugh, Management and Social Sciences Librarian for Innovation & Entrepreneurship from MIT Libraries, will explain the best tools to use as well as share more about:

  • How to conduct a preliminary patent search using subscription-based and freely available tools
  • How to find the most relevant market research using specialized resources
  • How patent searching can inform market research and vice versa