Academic

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Writing your literature review: getting started with the libraries
Jan/25 Tue 11:00AM–12:00PM

Are you writing a literature review for a thesis or an article? Need to find background information and go deep into the literature to find out what has been done before? Join us for this virtual workshop to get more information about using resources from the MIT Libraries and techniques for identifying places to look for literature, tips on keeping track of what you've found, and an overview of the structure and role of the literature review in the research process.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/litreview

2022 LIDS Student Conference
Jan/26 Wed 08:45AM–05:30PM
Jan/27 Thu 09:00AM–05:30PM

The annual LIDS Student Conference is a student-organized, student-run conference that provides an opportunity for graduate students and postdocs to present their research to peers as well as to the community at large. This year, we are delighted to welcome four distinguished plenary speakers and accompanying student sessions in Machine Learning and Statistics; Information and Networks; Control Theory and Applications; Algorithms, Optimization, and Game Theory.

This year's plenary speakers are:

  • Yuejie Chi
    Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University

  • Na Li
    Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Mathematics
    School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)
    Harvard University

  • Angelia Nedich
    Professor in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering
    Arizona State University

  • Adam Wierman
    Professor in the Department of Computing and Mathematical Sciences (CMS)
    California Institute of Technology

For more information, including the full schedule of events, visit: https://lidsconf.mit.edu/2022/

**NOTE: This year's conference will be virtual. Registration is requested.**

2022 Make It: Pinball! Workshop
Jan/05 Wed 03:00PM–04:30PM

Design and make your own pinball game AND learn how to use CAD software and Maker tools in the process.  Want to make it collaborative, or even competitive?  This base is designed to be easily combined with another for a 2-player pinball game.

 

Here’s how it works:

Assemble our blank pinball machine kit, design your game, then learn and use the Maker tools in the Edgerton Center Student Project Lab/Makerlodge. We’ve got 3D printers, a laser cutter, vinyl/craft cutters, electronics, microcontrollers, and shop tools, along with miscellaneous crafting materials.

There will be tutorial sessions for each tool group, and mentored shop time for construction of any kind.

 

The class is limited to 22. There is a materials fee of $25 which covers a base kit, 3 pinballs, and any other lab materials you need to create your machine.  The fee can be paid online after the application deadline, in case we need to do a lottery.

 

APPLY on this form by Mon Jan 3, 2021, 5pm EST. Preference is given to undergraduates.

 

SCHEDULE

 

Registration

Apply by Jan 3, 5 pm - Lottery if needed. 

Notification of acceptance by Jan 3, 7pm

Confirm registration and pay materials fee by Jan 4, 5 pm                            

 

Lessons + Mentored shop time (lessons are 3:00 - 4:30pm, Shop Time is 4:30 - 6:00)

Wed Jan 5 Kickoff and Base assembly

Fri Jan 7 3D Printers and CAD lesson, 

Mon Jan 10 Laser Cutters, Vinyl Cutters and 2D graphics

Wed Jan 12 Electronics and Microcontrollers

Fri Jan 14 CAD techniques

 

Mentored shop time 4:30 - 6:00

Wed Jan 19, Fri Jan 21, Mon Jan 24, Wed 26 

 

Pinball-Palooza Showcase

Fri Jan 28 5:00 - 6:00

A Taste of Programming with SICP JS
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–12:00PM

With visiting professor Martin Henz. We can understand some computer programs in the way we solve math equations: by performing one simple algebraic step after another, until we reach an answer. This Independent Activity introduces programming in this way, inspired by the first chapter of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, JavaScript edition (SICP JS). We start from first principles, by looking at functions that you know from mathematics, but before long, you will program interesting graphics and sound patterns using the Source Academy, a website built for SICP JS. The Activity offers entertaining and thought-provoking insights into the essence of computation, and at the same time an introduction to programming using the popular programming language JavaScript.

Syllabus:

Day 1: The elements: See the basic ingredients of all computer programs
Day 2: A picture language: Program graphical patterns by wishful thinking
Day 3: Functions: Experience the magic of higher-order programming
Day 4: A curve language: Program fractals and three-dimensional curves with functions
Day 5: The lambda calculus: Explore the essence of computation
Day 6: Functional sound processing: Make some noise

For more details and to register see https://www.eecs.mit.edu/academics/iap-offerings/iap-2022/.

All About UROP
Jan/04 Tue 04:00PM–05:00PM

Learn all about UROP, including benefits and modes of participation, key ways to identify opportunities, how how to prepare yourself for the UROP search/interview process, and more!

Aren't We Better Off Without Christianity?
Jan/20 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

40 years ago, sociologists believed that as the world became more modern, more educated, and more scientific, religious belief would naturally decline. Many western intellectuals thought this was both inevitable and desirable: religion would not survive in the modern world, and we modern people would be better off without it. Doesn't Christianity hinder our pursuits of modern values? What is our reality today? Is Christianity positive or negative for individuals and society? And what shapes how we determine what makes us “better off”?

Dr. REBECCA McLAUGHLIN, Ph.D. in English literature from Cambridge University, Theology degree from Oak Hill College in London. Speaker, Writer, and author of Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion. Find out more about Rebecca at www.rebeccamclaughlin.org.

Beyond the Lab: Journey from Scientist to Founder with E14 Fund
Jan/24 Mon 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 04:00PM–06:00PM

Are you a scientist or engineer curious about starting a deep tech company? Do you want to visit MIT startups in action and learn from founders who have successfully launched ventures out of their labs? Do you want to connect with venture investors dedicated to supporting MIT founders? This course will cover the basics of launching your founder journey and will include trips to Boston-area startups across growth stages. You will join a cohort of future founders with continued opportunities to engage beyond IAP. This course is designed for any student or postdoc thinking about starting a company and we hope to build a diverse cohort of participants across backgrounds and interests. The course is sponsored by E14 Fund, the early stage venture capital firm from and for the MIT startup community.

If you are interested in this course, please complete this form (https://www.e14fund.com/iap) by December 2nd to apply to join the Beyond the Lab cohort for IAP 2022 (January 24th - 28th). This course is designed for any student or postdoc thinking about starting a company and we hope to build a diverse cohort of participants across backgrounds and interests.

If you have any questions or want to be added to the E14 startup community slack channel, please email iap@e14fund.com.

BioBots (BioMakers Workshop)
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM

The BioMakers IAP Google Calendar (Check for Updates)

Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays 1-4 pm starting Jan 6th (+ Friday session 1/14 1-2 PM)

Workshop Contact: Rachel Shen (rs2000@mit.edu), biomakers-exec@mit.edu 

Description:  Biological robots, or biobots, use living cells to sense, process, and respond to their environments. The BioBots workshop is a workshop that meets twice a week during IAP in which students make rings of muscle tissue that are able to generate a force around a soft skeleton. This is a great way to learn more about tissue culture.

 

Biocementing with Microbes (BioMaker Workshop)
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/17 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 01:00PM–04:00PM

Description: This workshop introduces students to the process of biocementing with microbes. Today, the production of cement for concrete accounts for 8% of global CO2 emissions. Microbially Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) is a promising biocement alternative. The process makes use of microbes to catalyze calcium carbonate crystals that can bind aggregate together.

 

In this workshop, you will learn lab protocols for using the bacteria to biocement aggregate including cultivating the microbe, preparing solutions to induce crystal formation, and biocementing loose sand. We will test different experimental parameters to characterize and optimize the process as well as 3d printing custom designs to make your own fun biocemented sample!

 

More info

 

For more information email lmzalez@mit.edu andcurth@mit.edu

Sign-up Deadline: December 30

 

Bioscience Protocols and Methods: Recipes for Success
Jan/19 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

A couple hours with the Libraries' protocols and methods resources can save you a couple of weeks in the lab. Need to know how to do Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity in freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans? Improve your efficiency by learning strategies for finding published research protocols and methods. This session is a hands-on practicum that introduces attendees to resources that support bioscience bench research.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8594399

Book Discussion: The Territories of Science and Religion
Jan/04 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM
Jan/11 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM
Jan/18 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM
Jan/25 Tue 03:00PM–04:30PM

Are science and religion inherently opposed?  Have they always been?  Not necessarily, argues distinguished scholar Peter Harrison in The Territories of Science and Religion.  He demonstrates that the concepts of science and religion, as we understand them, are relatively recent, and that the boundaries between them have historically been dynamic and even permeable.  Come join fellow members of the MIT community to read and discuss Harrison’s book and examine how very different approaches to reality have related to and mutually enriched each other, and how they may do so again.

Building the Independent Nation: Morocco’s architectural heritage, 1940-1980
Jan/18 Tue 05:00PM–06:30PM

This lecture will highlight some of the built experiences in Morocco between 1940 and 1980, assessing its significance within the long cultural history of Morocco. It concludes with a discussion of architectural heritage preservation, posing such questions as what are the criteria for determining what should be documented and preserved, and what are the challenges in doing so?

The lecture is intended for all audiences interested in architecture and planning, as well as those interested in learning more about Moroccan architecture and culture. The presentation will be followed by an extended Q&A.

Speaker Biography:
Lahbib El Moumni is an architect and professor at the school of Architecture in Casablanca, Morocco. In 2016 he and fellow architect Imad Dahmani founded Association MAMMA (Mémoire des Architectes Modernes Marocains) to highlight the built heritage of Morocco from the last 15 years of the Protectorate through 1980. The work of MAMMA includes researching and archiving architectural heritage of this period, as well as raising awareness of it through conferences, workshops, exhibitions, and seminars on the architecture, art, and history of Modern Morocco.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/ModernMorocco 

Carpentries @ MIT: Intro to UnixShell/Python/Git
Jan/19 Wed 12:30PM–05:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 08:30PM–05:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–05:00PM

Software Carpentry aims to help researchers get their work done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic research computing skills. This hands-on introductory workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

This four-session event takes place on three days. You are expected to attend the workshop on all three days. If you can no longer make it to the workshop, please be sure to cancel your registration since we may have a long waiting list.

For workshop details: https://carpentriesmit.github.io/2022-01-19-mit/ Please follow the Setup instructions on this linked page to install needed software and packages before attending the workshop.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/carpentries2022-01-19

Registration opens at 12:00pm on December 13, 2021.

Chemical Engineering Chocolate Experiment 
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM
Join ChemE on a chocolate adventure where you can learn all about how chocolate is made and experiment with the properties of chocolate and how it relates to taste and texture. This virtual hands-on experience is open to first years only! 
 
Delicious chocolates will be delivered to you – ChemE flavored! 
Make sure to RSVP to claim your chocolate and your seat: https://forms.gle/2ifxk5ScyL3N5sMs5
Date: Wednesday, January 19th 
Time: 1:00-2:00 PM
virtual event
 
Registration or event questions: Sharece Corner scorner3@mit.edu
Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Teaching and Research using the Wolfram Language
Jan/14 Fri 04:00PM–05:00PM

In this session Prof Abbot will present a range of examples to demonstrate why the Wolfram Language is an unparalleled teaching and research tool. Topics to be covered: (1) Using the simple and powerful free-form input functionality; (2) Discussing the consistent syntax and excellent interactive documentation; (3) Examples of high-level numerics, symbolics, visualization, and graphics; (4) Demonstrating the easy access to a wide range of curated data sources and code repositories; (5) Showing how to write papers and theses as Notebooks; and, finally, (6) Setting and assessing open-ended research-style exam questions.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98175785044

Activity Leaders:
Paul Abbott,  Professor of Physics, The University of Western Australia
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Accelerating Chemistry Research and Learning Chemistry with Computational Thinking and Computable Knowledge
Jan/12 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

Designing active-learning modules that function across in-person, hybrid and remote learning spaces remains challenging and nontrivial for chemical educators at all levels. One route to future-proof modules is via interactive electronic notebooks. Example notebooks bridging multiple learning spaces are discussed along with strategies for incorporation across the curriculum.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98501491458

Activity Leaders:
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science
Jason Sonnenberg, Wolfram Research

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Create an Animation, Simulate a Research Model, or Solve a Problem-Set Problem in 60 Seconds, and Other Mathematica Tips and Tricks
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

Mathematica and its underlying language, the Wolfram Language, is useful to very quickly create calculations and visualizations to support any type of course involving computation (not just Mathematics). Students will learn how to perform calculations with standard Wolfram Language syntax or with Wolfram|Alpha style (i.e., using natural language processing to replace rigid syntax), create animations or interactive GUIs, efficiently learn and use the Wolfram Language, and share ideas or projects over the web with anyone which include live computations. Several additional examples will be shown involving data analysis, writing efficient code, and other newer aspects of Mathematica. Students will receive a copy of the examples in Wolfram Notebook format to use as a guide, and no prior experience with Mathematica is required.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/97381356971

Activity Leaders:
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science
Kelvin Mischo, Coauthor of Hands-on Start to Wolfram Mathematica, 3rd Edition

Computational Research and Studies with Mathematica: Using The Wolfram Language and Mathematica for your Problem Sets, Research, and Learning
Jan/14 Fri 03:00PM–04:00PM

Millions of students all over the world use the Wolfram Language as a reliable and powerful tool for doing computations in calculus. During this talk, I will give an overview of recent initiatives to build on these computational capabilities and transition the Wolfram Language to a system for learning the fundamental concepts, theorems and applications of calculus. These initiatives include a successful program for solving all the exercises in a popular calculus textbook using the Wolfram Language,  fully refreshed documentation pages with textbook-style examples for single and multivariable calculus,  large benchmark comparisons  for limits, integrals and other basic calculus operations, and free online courses along with cohort-based study groups for calculus and related areas of the undergraduate curriculum. The overall goal of this program is to apply the Wolfram Language for making calculus education accessible and enjoyable for students everywhere.

Sign up not necessary, but please send an email to ccarter at mit.edu if you would like to be apprised of class announcements and materials.

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/93353326576

Activity Leaders:
W Craig Carter, Professor of Materials Science
Devendra Kapadia, Wolfram Research

Crafting a Compelling Abstract
Jan/24 Mon 10:00AM–11:30AM

For your paper to be successful, people have to actually read it. A compelling abstract is essential for capturing readers' attention and making them want to read more. But writing an effective abstract is challenging because you need to summarize what motivated you, what you did, and what you found, in a small number of words. In this workshop, Thalia Rubio, a WCC Communication Instructor, a technical writer, and a textbook author, will analyze sample abstracts, discuss editing strategies, and guide you through revising abstracts. You'll also have the opportunity to begin developing your own abstract and will leave with a better understanding of how to write a strong abstract that clearly presents your research.

Data Management: File Organization
Jan/11 Tue 02:00PM–04:00PM

Do you struggle with organizing your research data?  Wonder if there’s a better way to arrange and name your data files to optimize your work? This workshop will teach you practical techniques for organizing your data files. Topics include: file and folder organizational structures, file naming, and versioning. Hands-on exercises will help you to apply the covered concepts to your particular data projects and challenges.

Details for connecting to this online session will be provided to registered participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/fileOrg_jan22

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/11 Tue 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98703478477

(registration not required).

To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/19 Wed 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/95624917949 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/20 Thu 05:30PM–06:00PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/93930057732 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

Decarbonizing Mongolia's Capital - 22.s092 spring course virtual info session
Jan/27 Thu 05:00PM–05:30PM

Virtual info session (IAP, not for credit) for a new six-unit spring course where students tackle real-world climate & sustainability challenges. All first-years and sophomores welcome! The course is open to all majors and counts toward units beyond the GIRs. View the course syllabus here. For any inquiries, contact Lead Instructor Dr. Rea Lavi at realavi@mit.edu.

Link to info session: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98566612079 (registration not required). To receive an email reminder 24hrs before the event and a calendar invite, click here.

The course will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of instructors. Students will also be able to engage with experts from the National University of Mongolia through an online forum.

In this course, you will:

- Tackle, in small teams, a real-world multidisciplinary challenge taken from the MIT project Decarbonizing Ulan Bator led by Prof. Mike Short.

- Learn and apply state-of-the-art tools and techniques for problem-solving: conceptual modeling, brainstorming, prototyping, and more

- Have the option to continue developing your solution beyond the course, with funding and support dependent on the quality of your suggested solution

We look forward to seeing you in the session!

Dr. Lavi and the instructional team

EECS Virtual UROP Fair
Jan/13 Thu 11:00AM–12:00PM

Are you interested in learning more about some of the many EECS UROP opportunities available for the Spring 2022 semester?  If so, we’ve got the perfect event lined up for you!  The EECS Graduate Student Association (GSA) is holding a virtual UROP fair on January 13th and 14th.    You will have the opportunity to chat with current graduate students and faculty members regarding their projects to find the best project for you!  We’ve got over 35 available projects spanning all subfields of EECS for you to shop from, so please do stop by!

You can start browsing available opportunities right now by accessing the project booklet below:

https://tinyurl.com/mit-eecs-gsa-urop-booklet-sp22

Event Details:

Date/Time: January 13th from 11 am to 12 pm and January 14th from 1 pm to 2 pm ET

Virtual Location: https://tinyurl.com/mit-eecs-gsa-urop-gather-sp22

If you have any questions feel free to contact eecs-gsa-exec@mit.edu.   We hope to see you at the fair!

EECS Virtual UROP Fair
Jan/13 Thu 11:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM

Are you interested in learning more about some of the many EECS UROP opportunities available for the Spring 2022 semester?  If so, we’ve got the perfect event lined up for you!  The EECS Graduate Student Association (GSA) is holding a virtual UROP fair on January 13th and 14th.    You will have the opportunity to chat with current graduate students and faculty members regarding their projects to find the best project for you!  We’ve got over 35 available projects spanning all subfields of EECS for you to shop from, so please do stop by!

You can start browsing available opportunities right now by accessing the project booklet below:

https://tinyurl.com/mit-eecs-gsa-urop-booklet-sp22

Event Details:

Date/Time: January 13th from 11 am to 12 pm and January 14th from 1 pm to 2 pm ET

Virtual Location: https://tinyurl.com/mit-eecs-gsa-urop-gather-sp22

If you have any questions feel free to contact eecs-gsa-exec@mit.edu.   We hope to see you at the fair!

Eloranta Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships Info Session
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

The Peter J. Eloranta Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships are awarded each spring to MIT undergraduates who submit proposals for their own novel research projects and/or further development of innovative ideas, devices, prototypes, etc.

This info session will provide an overview on the Eloranta Fellowships, eligibility guidelines, how to apply, and tips on what makes a strong proposal!

Experimental Apparatus Design
Jan/19 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–04:00PM

In this course you will work with a team to generate concept documents for idea generation, to evaluate concept documents, to create mini-proposals for an apparatus to test your idea, review mini-proposals, and finally how to produce Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) or Manuals as needed to document how to maintain and operate the apparatus. Intended for Graduate Students, Senior Undergraduates, or Postdoctoral Researchers interested in developing physical experimental equipment.

Leader: Brian Neltner

Participants must attend all 4 sessions.

Enrollment limit: 12. Deadline Jan 14, 2022. To enroll, contact Brian Neltner, neltnerb@mit.edu

Finding Demographic Data
Jan/13 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

Join us for brief overview of census data followed by a demonstration of library resources you can use to query and download demographic data. While the workshop will focus on US data, we will discuss general search strategies for finding international data and include links to library databases. We will also mention resources you can use to map this data.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/demographic_data_jan2022

Flipping Failure IAP 2022 Workshop Series
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–02:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM

Have you ever faced an academic challenge and wished you could share what you learned with peers?

Craft and share your story by joining the Flipping Failure IAP Workshop Series

The workshop series will be a guided process of reflection and discovery to capture and transfigure your unique story. Participants will work with a media artist and a storyteller coach (and past winner of The Moth StorySLAM) to craft their stories into creative audio narratives to be featured in the Flipping Failure website.

To apply, click here

Who should participate

Any undergraduate and graduate student interested in sharing their story of academic challenge, particularly through a creative lens. 

Please note that to establish a close-knit cohort and provide adequate coaching;

  • space is limited to 6 participants.
  • attendance is required for all workshops.

Admitted participants will be notified on a rolling basis. 

We welcome stories of ALL academic challenges. We are also particularly interested in stories that address challenges in navigating professor/advisor relationships, searching for internships and academic jobs, deciding among different career paths (example, industry vs. academia), or balancing work and life. These themes recently emerged as particularly relevant to current MIT undergraduate and graduate students and are ones that are not as well represented on the Flipping Failure site.

 

Duration and time commitment: 

Approximately 9 hours of remote workshop time (over Zoom):

  • WED, 1/12 | 10-2 pm (with lunch break)
  • FRI, 1/14 | 10-12 pm 
  • WED, 1/19 | 10-12 pm 
  • 1-hour individual meeting scheduled at a time that works for you during week of Jan 20-27 (over Zoom)

For more information about this series navigate HERE.

GIS Level 1: Introduction to GIS & Mapping (In Person)
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–12:00PM

Our in-person GIS workshop is canceled but we will still be offering this workshop online on 1/4. Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/gislevel1_jan22

Learn how to read and interpret maps and data and use basic cartography principles to create maps that can be used in reports and presentations. You will have the option of completing short exercises using QGIS or ArcGIS Pro as well as a longer exercise after the workshop for additional learning.

You must already have campus access in order to attend. We will not be issuing guest passes for those not already in MIT covidpass. An MIT ID is required to enter the GIS & Data Lab.

Prefer to attend online? This same workshop will be offered virtually on 1/4/22.

GIS Level 1: Introduction to GIS & Mapping (Online)
Jan/04 Tue 01:00PM–03:30PM

Learn how to read and interpret maps and data and use basic cartography principles to create maps that can be used in reports and presentations. You will have the option of completing short exercises using QGIS or ArcGIS Pro as well as a longer exercise after the workshop for additional learning.

A few days before the workshop we will send information about installing the required software.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/gislevel1_jan22

GIS Level 2: Introduction to Spatial Analysis
Jan/18 Tue 01:00PM–03:30PM

Expand your experience with desktop GIS software and learn how to use analysis tools to query data, conduct spatial statistics, and analyze vector and raster data using QGIS or ArcGIS Pro.

Previous GIS experience is required, such as taking the Intro to GIS workshop.

A few days before the workshop we will send information about installing the required software.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/gislevel2_jan22

GIS Level 3: Automating your work in ArcGIS Pro
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–05:00PM

Do you want to automate your work in Arcgis Pro so you can run processes on many datasets or run the same process on a different dataset a year from now? The goal of this workshop is to get you started on automating your work in Arcgis Pro and giving you tools to make your research reproducable. This workshop introduces you to Model Builder, a visual programming language that gives you access to all Arcgis Pro tools. You will next learn the very basics of coding in Python then start working with arcpy, the Arcgis Pro Python Module. Be prepared to write code during the workshop.

You must already have campus access in order to attend. We will not be issuing guest passes for those not already in MIT covidpass. An MIT ID is required to enter the GIS & Data Lab.

Prerequisite: a basic knowledge of Arcgis Pro, including analysis tools Clip and Buffer. Some scripting experience in Stata, Matlab, R, or another language is helpful.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/arcpy2022

GIS Topics: Introduction to Planet and Planet Explorer: How to Access Daily Imagery
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM

This session is a non-technical introduction to Planet, Planet satellites and Planet imagery. In this presentation you will learn more about Planet satellites and the imaging sensors onboard. You will also learn the different ways in which users can access Planet imagery. Finally, there will be a live demonstration of how to use Planet Explorer, our online tool to help you search and download Planet imagery.

  • Introduction to Planet and Planet satellites
  • Introduction to Planet Platforms and Integrations
  • Demonstration of Planet Explorer

Speaker: Austin Stone, Customer Success Manager, Education & Research, Planet

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/planet_intro_iap2022

GIS Topics: Performing imagery analysis using Deep learning tools in ArcGIS Pro
Jan/20 Thu 02:00PM–05:00PM

ArcGIS Pro allows you to use statistical or machine learning classification methods to classify remote-sensing imagery. Deep learning models can be integrated with ArcGIS Pro for object detection, object classification, and image classification. In this workshop, we will show the workflow from data preparation, run the model, use deep learning tools and parameter. We will also cover the ready-to-use geospatial AI models available in the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World.

Prerequisites: Working knowledge of ArcGIS Pro

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/deeplearning_ArcGISPro_Jan2022

Image Credit: ESA – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

GIS Topics: Using the Cloud to Compute and Analyze Daily Satellite Imagery
Jan/12 Wed 02:00PM–03:00PM

This session is geared for technical users and those who wish to use cloud computing platforms, such as Google Earth Engine for satellite image processing and data analysis. This presentation, given by Sam Roy, Solutions Architect at Planet, will cover how to deliver Planet imagery directly to Google Cloud Project using Planet’s API’s (Delivery sample will be provided as a Jupyter Notebook). Furthermore, this session will demonstrate how to connect your Google Cloud Project to your Google Earth Engine account and perform spectral analyses in the Google Earth Engine environment.

  • Delivery to Google Cloud Project using Planet API’s
  • Introduction to Cloud Native Environment: Google Earth Engine
  • Demonstrate Examples of Cloud Processing on Planet Imagery

MIT Touchstone authentication is required to register. Email gishelp@mit.edu before the workshop if you don't already have an MIT Planet account.

Speaker: Sam Roy PhD, Solutions Architect, Planet

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/planet_cloud_iap2022

Groupflow - Leveraging AI to untangle the surprising link between ethics, happiness, and business success
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM

This IAP course will teach you how to measure and increase individual happiness and wellbeing, team collaboration and performance, and organizational culture and values, by leveraging the latest advances in AI, NLP, machine learning, and social network analysis to reach groupflow. Groupflow extends the flow concept coined by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi to teams. Groupflow enables teams to reach their highest productive and creative state, cooperating above and beyond of what each team member is capable of. Research has clearly shown what creates happy and motivated employees – giving them respect, empower them to take their own decisions, and be an empathic, humble leader – but it is awfully hard to actually lead by those principles.

Our approach consists of analyzing individuals’ communication patterns and making them self-aware by mirroring their behavior back to them in a privacy-respecting way.  This method is based on 20 years of research from our MIT Collaborative Innovation Networks (COIN) project on leadership, creativity, team building, and positive psychology.

The course is based on the forthcoming book “Groupflow - Leveraging AI to untangle the surprising link between ethics, happiness, and business success

Enrollment: advance signup required by January 23, limited to 25 participants

Attendance: first session teaches basic concepts; second session is small group discussion about use cases and potential projects

Prereq: Basic statistics skills and computer literacy

Instructor: Peter Gloor, pgloor@mit.edu

E-Mail instructor to sign up.

Hands on Full Duplex Radio - IAP
Jan/25 Tue 01:00PM–03:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 01:00PM–03:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–03:00PM

Design, build and test your own full-duplex radio with real-world hardware/software engineering!

 

Full-duplex technology is revolutionizing the wireless world! This system concept is fundamentally different that traditional radios that divide transmission and reception in either time and/or frequency. Future networks will leverage this emerging technology to improve efficiency and enhance mobile user experiences. This course will introduce students to the various self-interference cancellation techniques that enable full-duplex operation in wireless systems and will allow them to create their own full-duplex radios through hands-on engineering with real-world hardware/software.

Email Ken Kolodziej to register for the class.

Hands on Holography IAP
Jan/19 Wed 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 09:00AM–12:00PM

This course will explore the fascinating applications of holography. What is holography? It is not merely art; holography encompasses a variety of measurement and recording techniques at the intersection of wave-propagated interference and diffraction. Consequently, it enjoys utility and relevance across physics domains, from low radio frequencies through optical wavelengths, to X-ray and beyond. This course will demystify holography by covering fundamental theory coupled with hands on laboratory sessions. During the laboratory sessions students will create their own computer generated holograms and a traditional optical hologram to take home.  

Email: gregory.balonek@ll.mit.edu for information on how to register.

How it Really Works: Planning, Funding, and Implementing Transportation Projects in the Real World
Jan/20 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

Have you ever wondered how transportation really works? (Have you ever wondered how ANYTHING really works?) Do you have strong feelings, or simply a passing interest? Come and join our discussion session! Everyone is welcome regardless of background or status -- we welcome a wide range of perspectives.

Transportation has never been more exciting: scooters, drones, autonomous vehicles, ridesharing, big data, climate change, energy, equity, economics. But actually making things happen requires an understanding of real-world decision-making, and considering these new developments in transportation gives us an opportunity to study the choices and constraints available to today's planners, all now further complicated by the uncertainties and changes posed by Covid-19 and shifting travel patterns. This session will offer a practice-oriented overview of the issues, players, and trends most relevant to contemporary transportation planning, featuring two MIT/DUSP alumni currently working in the field.

Pre-registration required: https://mit.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsce-gpjItGdH-Wh1Ip6ZHcYo9S8OZQ6Au

Hypocrisy: If Jesus Christ is so Good, Why is the Church so Bad?
Jan/18 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

In a recent survey at MIT, students were asked, “For you, what makes Christianity or God's existence difficult for you to believe?” The most picked answer was the hypocrisy they see in those who identify as Christian and the Church. There is no arguing that hypocrisy exists among Christians and the Church. Hypocrisy is a massive deterrent for people no matter who it comes from. If Christianity is supposed to make people better, then why associate with something that doesn’t really seem to work? Why accept it as true? How can it be worth considering when it seems like Christians don’t even follow its teachings?

LOU PHILLIPS, Traveling speaker with the Lighten Group, Theological studies at the OXFORD CENTER FOR CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS

IAP Course: Eyes in the Sky
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–02:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 08:00AM–04:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 08:00AM–04:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM
Jan/24 Mon 10:00AM–02:00PM

Hands-on Workshop for using UAVs in mapping the built environment and Climate Change risk assessment (Non-credit)

Enrollment Limit: 15 students

Complete this online form to sign up

Drones are providing us with new ways to map, monitor, and measure our changing landscape. Advances in digital image processing enable one to go from flying a drone to working with accurate maps and 3D models in a matter of hours. In this workshop, students will learn how to use drones and other geospatial technologies to help them better understand our changing environment. Upon completion of this workshop, students will have theoretical and applied knowledge that will aid them to use UAVs in various applications.

In this workshop, students will gain hands-on experience with drone vehicles, sensors, image processing software and applications. With the proliferation of drones there are increasing opportunities to use drones for scientific remote sensing data acquisition and applications. This workshop focuses on understanding the fundamentals behind acquiring imagery data with drone-based cameras (e.g. multi-spectral and thermal) and processing the data for various applications.

Learning outcomes

• Understand how to use drones as a platform to acquire data
• Understand components and functions of a drone system, DJI as the main platform
• Understand the photogrammetric principles of drone-based image acquisition and processing in Drone Deploy platform
• Understand basic flight planning and data acquisition with a drone
• Develop insight into drone operation and basic maneuvering.
• Understand how to operate various drone-based sensors, RGB camera, LiDar, and Thermal.
• Develop the ability to process drone-derived raw data imagery (RGB camera, Multispectral, Thermal, LiDAR) to various applications.
• Gain oversight of the complete mission pipe-line, from planning to final product.
• Learn to present research proposals and complete a project as a team member

Format

Students will work in teams of 3-5 students to apply basic flight planning and flight procedures to a mapping problem. Each team will work with a qualified flying instructor during the data collection process to develop a flight checklist, flight plan, GCP plan and produce an 2D orthomosaic and 3D model from UAV data using drone deploy platform. Each team will present the processing output at the end of the workshop and key insights on using UAVs in urban mapping and climate change problems.

Notes

• Students will not be required to acquire their own data as the data will be acquired by the qualified drone instructors with students participating in the data collection.
• This course will not lead directly to certification of students for operating a drone.
• The course is not about flying drones, but about understanding how to acquire and process remote sensing data.

Complete this online form to sign up

Recommended Reading

Jensen, John R, 2017. Drone Aerial Photography and Videography: Data Collection and Image Interpretation. Amazon Kindle store or Apple iBooks store. NOTE: The Amazon Kindle store version is recommended as it can be viewed on either the Microsoft Windows or the Apple operating systems.

Course Instructors: Norhan Bayomi, Postdoctoral Fellow, Building Technology Program, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative; Prof. John E. Fernandez, Director of the Urban Metabolism Group (Building Technology Program), Director of MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative.

Co-Instructor: Marcela Angel, Research Associate, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative.

Schedule

Tuesday, January 18:

  • Lecture: Introduction to UAVs Platform and sensing applications (10:00 to 11:00 am)
  • Lecture: UAVs application in the Built Environment - Thermal Imaging (11:30 to 12:30 pm)
  • Tutorial: Class Structure and field study regulations (1:30 to 2:30 pm)

Wednesday, January 19

  • Drone Operations 101 (8:00 to 11:00 am Class session A)
  • Basic Flight Training (12-1pm Class session B)
  • Field Training Session (1 – 4 pm)

Thursday, January 20

  • Lecture: UAVs application in Climate Change Risk Assessment (8:00 to 9:00 am)
  • Drone Data Processing Mapping & Modelling (9:30 to 12:30)
  • Field Training Session (1 – 4 pm)

Friday, January 21

  • Lecture: UAVs Data Type and Processing Platforms (9:00 to 10:00 am)
  • Field Training: Hands on Data Collection with drones in Briggs Field

Monday, January 24

  • Projects Presentation (10-1)
  • Final Tips (1-2 pm)
IAP Course: Teaching with Sustainability
Jan/05 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–12:00PM

Enrollment: Limited: Advance sign-up required. 

Attendance: Participants must attend all sessions.

Prereq: None.

This non-credit class will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to infuse their lessons and practices with sustainability. The class will focus on identifying goals for students and actions to get there, what it means to teach sustainably, and the opportunity to plan for future lessons using sustainability as a guide. In addition, participants will learn sustainable pedagogical practices that increase student engagement, and ultimately learning, in their classes.

Sustainability education is an emergent field focused on solving complex wicked problems that are interconnected throughout social, environmental, economic and health fields. In working to address these inherently complex and wicked sustainability problems scholars have identified the need to perturb existing education systems, advocating for education of a different kind which will create a more sustainability literate population. To achieve the lasting impact necessary for true change to occur sustainability needs to be holistically integrated throughout an academic program leveraging the knowledge of instructors to build this complex connection. This class will help participants think through what sustainability means in their area of expertise, while practicing this in terms of best teaching practices.

Anyone is welcome to participate, however, the class will be tailored to individuals who are currently teaching (i.e. graduate students, postdocs, faculty, lecturers) or those who may be teaching in the future.

Signup Deadline: December 22. E-mail the instructors to sign up.

Instructors:

  • Liz Potter-Nelson, Sustainability Education Postdoctoral Associate at ESI, epottern@mit.edu
  • Sarah Meyers, Education Program Manager at ESI, smeyers@mit.edu

Schedule:

4, 2-hour sessions, from 10am-noon

  • Wednesday, January 5th
  • Wednesday, January 12th
  • Wednesday, January 19th
  • Wednesday, January 26th
IAP Non-Credit Activity: Bookmaking with Risography
Jan/10 Mon 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 02:00PM–04:00PM

This course will overview the main concepts surrounding bookmaking, art books, self publishing and various printing techniques using risography, rolling press, digital duplication, folding, zines, animation and binding techniques. You will learn the basics of how to work with a Riso machine, prepare your files, how to scan negatives and assemble your own publications or prints in a variety of techniques. The workshops will be held in the Weisner Art Gallery where the ppppress is hosting a show.

The work produced in the workshop will be part of the exhibition that will be open until mid January.

To sign up: Contact Emma Yimeng Zhu.

IAP Seminar: Investigating Leadership and Engineering through Film and Media: The Making of the Atomic Bomb
Jan/11 Tue 01:00PM–02:30PM

Speakers:
Andrew Silver, Film director, MIT and Sloan Alum
Chris Boebel, Media Development Director, MIT Open Learning

Enrollment limited: Advance sign-up required. Sign-up by 12/15

Using an award-winning BBC mini-series, along with supplemental references from film and books, participants will observe and discuss the leadership of one of the largest engineering projects in history: The “Manhattan Project” that designed and built the world’s first atomic bomb. In a small seminar setting, students will consider leadership of the project and moral responsibility in the context of the devastating use of atomic weapons at the close of World War II, clashing leadership styles between scientists and the military, and how these concerns relate to broader questions of leadership and ethics on complex scientific and engineering projects.

Interested students should contact Andrew Silver (e-mail below) for more information. View trailer.

This course will meet for two sessions:

Session One: Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 1 pm-2:30 pm
Leadership “Personas,” Clashing Leadership Styles, Collaboration, and Managing Personalities
Episode 3 of “Oppenheimer” (1980), BBC-TV TV Mini-Series starring Sam Waterston

Session Two: Thursday, January 13, 2022, 1pm-2:30 pm
Morality, Ethics, and Personal Responsibility
Episode 5 of “Oppenheimer”

Both sessions will meet at MIT Open Learning, 600 Technology Square, 2nd Floor

Sponsor(s): MIT Open Learning

Contact: Andrew Silver, asilver@asilverproduction.com

IAP: (Closed) Introduction to American Sign Language
Jan/05 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/06 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/07 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/10 Mon 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/13 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/14 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/17 Mon 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM

Global Languages is happy to offer a non-credit class, Introduction to American Sign Language, during IAP 2022. Ten sessions will be held from January 5 to January 19, 10:00 – 11:30 am. This is a virtual / Zoom class. 

This non-credit IAP class is an introduction to elementary aspects of American Sign Language and to Deaf culture for those with no prior experience. Sessions will focus on gaining specific areas of basic understanding/competency which can be applied to later introductory studies of ASL. Participants will also interact with topics including the role of ASL in Deaf history, current culture, and others.

Sessions will be led by Andrew Bottoms. Andrew Bottoms was born and raised in a Deaf family from North Carolina and American Sign Language (ASL) is his native language. Bottoms graduated from Gallaudet University with two bachelor degrees, one in American Sign Language (ASL) and the other in Deaf Studies.

Enrollment is limited to 20 participants with the expectation of attendance at all 10 sessions. Open to members of the MIT community.

Registration is required. All registrants will be contacted by December 23 with confirmation of enrollment or information on placement in a wait list (in the event of over-enrollment).

Registration closed!
Please sign interest form for future activities!

Due to interest well exceeding capacity, Global Languages has closed registration for ASL in IAP. Those who submitted a registration form will be contacted regarding enrollment or placement on the wait list.

If you are interested in future activities related to American Sign Language and Deaf culture, please submit your name and email at this Interest Form.

Global Languages is appreciative of the great show of interest in ASL and we hope we can bring such opportunities to the MIT community again soon.

 

IAP: Listening to Place
Jan/05 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 02:00PM–04:00PM

This is a three-day workshop that examines the history and use of recorded sound as a means to understand our relationship with the environment. Participants will develop both active listening and basic sound recording techniques in tandem, as interrelated tools of perception. We will discuss the relationship between objective and subjective listening as a lens for understanding how our dual role of participant/recorder determines the way we interact with the world.

The workshop will take place over three 2-hour sessions and will cover some basic aspects of the sound-recording and editing process as well as a conceptual framework with the aim of creating an audio portrait of a particular place, chosen by the participant. Participants should have access to an audio recorder, headphones and a computer for editing. Smartphones and earbuds are possible but not ideal. I am happy to discuss why and make recommendations for upgrades before or during the workshop.

Sessions will be in-person, in room 9-217 on three consecutive Wednesdays, from 2-4pm:

Wednesday, 1/5/22
Wednesday, 1/12/22
Wednesday, 1/19/22
 

IAP: The SPARC tokamak: Predicting performance in the world's first burning plasma
Jan/28 Fri 02:00PM–03:00PM

Speaker: Nathan Howard

The SPARC tokamak is scheduled to begin operation in 2025 and will later become the first tokamak to achieve burning plasma conditions.  Its success will pave the way to the realization of fusion as an energy source.   In this talk we will cover the need for fusion energy development and the high field path to fusion.  In particular, we will present a historical overview of the models used to predict tokamak performance and will highlight some of the cutting-edge work going on at MIT that has been used to predict SPARC and increase our confidence in SPARC’s success.

For Zoom link contact: info@psfc.mit.edu

IAP: The early 2022 fusion energy start-up landscape
Jan/27 Thu 11:00AM–12:00PM

Speaker: Sam Wurzel, Technology to Market Advisor, ARPA-E, U.S. Department of Energy

Over the past five years the number of fusion energy startups has doubled and private funding going to fusion companies has grown by a much larger factor. This talk will provide an overview of the fusion energy startup landscape, a discussion of their various approaches to fusion energy, and the historical context. For Zoom link contact: info@psfc.mit.edu 

IAP: The long road to 20 tesla on the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil: A magnet origin story
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM

The long road to 20 tesla on the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil: A magnet origin story

Speaker: Zach Hartwig

In the early morning hours of September 5 2021, the SPARC Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC), a joint project of the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Commonwealth Fusion Systems, achieved a peak magnetic field in excess of 20 tesla. This moment ushered in a new era of powerful high-field superconducting magnets for science and industrial applications and enabled a long-sought paradigm shift in fusion energy towards smaller, lower cost devices. But how did this come to be? What technologies and pioneers set the stage for the TFMC? How was it possible to execute a project of this scale and innovation in only two years? And why did this happen at MIT and not somewhere else? To answer these questions, this talk will attempt to map the century-long odyssey at MIT in high-field magnet research, development, and operations that laid the foundation for the success of the TFMC Project and then, with the technical and historical context firmly established, provide a more meaningful overview of the TFMC Project itself.

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part I)
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers better understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  tech? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current trends that may relate to changing how we write laws regulating new tech?

On the Crypto side, emphasis will be on the examples of NFTs in the music industry, and lessons learned on how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the legal framework of a value exchange system that is built on reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers to inclusivity without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states to emerging  technologies such as bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does ones freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand? These questions and others will be covered by:

  a panel group, including: hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Inclusive Bio- and Crypto- in Innovation: How Law and Technology Co-Evolve (Part II)
Jan/28 Fri 10:00AM–12:00PM

The legislative process still takes place mostly without input from those who understand the realities of newly deployed technologies. How can scientists, engineers, and lawyers understand their co-evolution in the disconnected world of innovation? 

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, and Boston-based innovation attorney Dimitrios Ioannidis (co-founders of the Osmocosm non-profit foundation) will address the intersection of science and law and the challenges of current regulation strategies for Bio- and Crypto- everything. How can lawyers help create the legal framework for Innovation in fast developing  fields? How can the business world responsibly finance innovation in law and what are the current changing trends in  how we write tech laws?

On the Crypto side, we will present the exaple of NFTs in the music industry, asking how legislation can propel the growth of music streaming. How can lawmakers create the framework of a value exchange system that is built on inlcusivity, reliability and the breaking of technological and social barriers -without creating new monsters?

On the Bio- everything side, the discussion will center on the human body and how it continuously leaks medically sensitive information: our body odor  reports on our physical and mental health states (osmodata)  to emerging technologies such as  bioelectronic noses soon coming to our smartphones. Where does one's freedom to protect oneself from infection stop and another person’s freedom from unwanted medical surveillance begin? Can courts seek the truth by scanning and detecting human witness emotions while on the stand?

Andreas and Dimitri will be joined by a panel group, including, hip hopper, Vin Rock, American photographer Ernie Paniccioli, Patrycja Treder, Esq. (Poland), Prof. Paula Arias (University of Miami; Elena Shiapani (CEO of MIBS Group), Prof. Dr. Şebnem AKİPEK ÖCAL (Ted University, Turkey); Arne Fuchs, LL.M. (Partner at McDermott, Germany), Nancy A. Freed, Esq. (Partner at Prince Lobel, Boston, USA),; Prof. Maria Koundoura (Emerson College, Boston); Charis Tan, Esq. (Partner at Peter & Kim, Singapore); Harpreet Dhillon, in house counsel for Twitter (Singapore); Jared L. Hubbard, partner at Fitch Group (Boston, USA), Andras Patkai - Executive Director BSS Unit Inc. (Hungary), Denis Kudriashov (Bose – Framingham, USA), Justin Holmes (entrepreneur – Boston, USA), Ass. Prof. Istvan Erdős (ELTE law school, Budapest, Hungary), Sophia Kambanis (Executive Director of Massachusetts Innovation Network), Kathryn Dickieson, (Biomedical Engineer/Space Scientist- Boston, USA) and Marianna Kleyman, (Scientist in Transformational and Translational Immunology Discovery at AbbVie, Cambidge, USA).

They will also be joined by law, science, and business school students, Cassandra Nedder (US), Mia Bonardi (US), Dionisio Antonio Mulone (Argentina), Christina Kazazaeva (Russia), Maria Sholokhova (Russia), Julia Jelenska, (Poland) Begum Yilmaz (Turkey), Lydia Koraki (Greece), and Basak Toker (Turkey).

Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148 

Introduction to CRISPR (BioMakers Workshop)
Jan/17 Mon 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 03:00PM–05:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 03:00PM–05:00PM

Schedule: 2 hour sessions (Jan 17th, Jan 19th, Jan 25th, Jan 27th in the afternoon 3 pm - 5 pm). Only sign-up for one session!

Workshop Contact: Ellie Feng, Kenneth Wei, Angela Gao, Abigail Lo (ellief@mit.edu, kewei@mit.edu, angao@mit.edu, abbylo@mit.edu)

 

Description: An introductory workshop to DNA editing in E. coli using CRISPR/Cas9. Participants will learn the basic mechanism of CRISPR and then transform E. coli with plasmids containing elements of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and observe results!

 

 

Introduction to Thermo-Calc
Jan/18 Tue 09:30AM–12:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 09:30AM–12:30PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:30AM–12:30PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:30AM–12:30PM

Offered by Prof. Greg Olson and Clay Houser. This activity is an introduction to the Thermo-Calc software and how it may be used to perform thermodynamic calculations and simulations. Throughout this week, students will be introduced to the CALculation of PHase Diagrams (CALPHAD) methodology and the Thermo-Calc software. We will provide guided examples of thermodynamic, diffusion, and precipitation simulations (Thermo-Calc, DICTRA, and TC-PRISMA). We will also demonstrate use of computational tools for materials design with real-world examples, including an introduction to the TC-Python API. Finally, students will develop understanding of the links between processing, structure, properties, and performance (system design framework). The class will involve instruction and discussion on the theory and function of these tools with guided examples and case studies. Signup here.

Introduction to cleaning and prepping data with OpenRefine
Jan/13 Thu 02:00PM–04:00PM

OpenRefine (formerly Google Refine) is a free, open source tool for working with messy data: cleaning it; transforming it from one format into another; and extending it with web services and external data. In this workshop, we’ll go through how to use OpenRefine to explore your data, clean it, transform it, and prep it for further analysis or visualization work. This is an introductory session; no prior experience with OpenRefine is required. A basic understanding of tabular data (spreadsheets) and familiarity with Microsoft Excel is helpful.

Attendees should download and install OpenRefine onto their computers prior to the class.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/openRefine_jan22

Introduction to pump-probe spectroscopy for study of thermal transport in materials
Jan/28 Fri 01:00PM–05:00PM

Pump-probe spectroscopy is a versatile and powerful technique to probe the microscopic dynamics of energy carriers. This course is designed to give a clear picture of pump-probe spectroscopy for the study of phonons in nano- to micron-scale. We will cover fundamentals of related fields including lasers, optics, photonics and technical knowledge to understand working principles and underlying physics of various pump-probe spectroscopy experiments, which have been a great success in the territory of the studies on heat transfer. By solving analytical models and applying data processing methods, we show that pump-probe spectroscopy techniques have successfully measured various types of materials and structures, discovered non-conventional thermal transport in materials and provided unique opportunities building the foundation of modern thermal science.

 

Isn't Religion Just a Psychological Delusion - Just Wishful Thinking to Comfort People?
Jan/27 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many today would say they do not want to believe in God, but that those who do are driven to do so as a kind of wish fulfillment.  This “You wish” argument against belief in God goes back to Voltaire, Diderot, Darwin, and Feuerbach.  And it was most popularized and sharpened by Freud. Freud referred to religion as “the universal obsessional neurosis of humanity,” and claimed that the spiritual worldview “distorts the picture of the real world in a delusional manner.” Dr. Brandon Unruh will help us examine these claims and critiques from his own lived experience and his professional experience as a clinician.

DR. BRANDON UNRUH, M.D - Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and clinician at McLean Hospital

LabArchives Inventory at MIT
Jan/12 Wed 03:00PM–04:00PM

LabArchives is an Electronic Lab Notebook system which MIT has an enterprise license for. The LabArchives support team (labarchives-support@mit.edu) has invited trainers from LabArchives to provide two virtual training sessions. These sessions will introduce the key features relevant to your use in a research or teaching lab, provide tips on tailoring a notebook to your specific needs, plus time to ask questions in order to save you time and get started using the platform.

The focus of this session is the new Inventory feature for streamlining the organization, tracking, and ordering of lab inventory.

Speaker: Hannah A. Clark, Enterprise Client Services, LabArchives, LLC - Better Science

Register: https://labarchives.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcsf-msrzIrGtMVWZAK9S-BVj2DMzu236n1

LabArchives Scheduler at MIT
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM

LabArchives is an Electronic Lab Notebook system which MIT has an enterprise license for. The LabArchives support team (labarchives-support@mit.edu) has invited trainers from LabArchives to provide two virtual training sessions. These sessions will introduce the key features relevant to your use in a research or teaching lab, provide tips on tailoring a notebook to your specific needs, plus time to ask questions in order to save you time and get started using the platform.

The focus of this session is the new Schedule feature for reserving Laboratory equipment, meeting rooms, or resources.

Speaker: Hannah A. Clark, Enterprise Client Services, LabArchives, LLC - Better Science

Register: https://labarchives.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEqf-mhpjgiHtF_fXyBdI3hydqEesqcRg6K

Lecture: Medinas of the Maghreb and the concept of Islamic city: Between texts and models.
Jan/25 Tue 05:00PM–06:30PM

On the question of an archetypal model of the Islamic city, several regional scholars and Orientalists have tried to give some answers, each focusing on a specific aspect to the originality of these cities. Some even expressed great skepticism toward the concept of "Islamic city" as an urban ideal of the Muslim world.

The purpose of this lecture is to confront various theoretical conceptions of this issue in order to trace morphological and landscape characteristics of Maghrebi medinas.


The lecture is intended for all audiences interested in the historical development of cities in the Maghreb or Islamic societies more broadly.  No prior knowledge is required. 

Speaker Biography: 
Amine Kasmi is a conservation architect and associate professor at the Department of Architecture, University of Tlemcen, Algeria. He teaches courses and conducts research in the history of urban design with a particular focus on the tensions between modern town planning and traditional urban fabric. His areas of interest also include the interaction between Islamic architecture and other architectures in the medieval Mediterranean world. He worked on numerous urban conservation sites in Algeria as well.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/MaghrebiMedinas 

Literature Review Writing (2-session series)
Jan/06 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM

Conducting and writing a literature review is a daunting multi-step process. In this two-session series, we will demystify the process of literature review writing by addressing how to organize your literature review (in the first workshop on Jan 6th) and how to write it (in the second one on Jan 11th). Through this hands-on virtual workshop, you will learn and practice how to launch your literature review process, synthesize your sources, and craft your narrative.

MAS.S73: Moving Beyond The Replication Crisis: How to Spot Misleading Social Science and Design Better Experiments
Jan/11 Tue 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 04:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 04:00PM–06:00PM
Offered for 3 credits P/D/F and open to listeners
Meets T/Th 4-6p in E15-359 (1/11, 1/13, 1/20, 1/25, and 1/27)

 

Course Description

 

The replication and generalizability crisis in social psychology has dramatic implications for designers and engineers. Poor research methodology has damaged our understanding of the relationship between human behavior or experience with intervention design; moreover, the statistical mistakes that underlie the crisis continue to threaten modern HCI research. Luckily, there are many useful resources available to help us navigate and understand the existing literature and prevent our work from falling into similar empirical traps.

 

In this class we will separate useful, empirically grounded psychology from common misconceptions; we will review conceptual details and common errors for the most widespread statistical analyses, alongside basic meta-statistics, so we can identify and avoid bias in the literature and in our own research; and we’ll look at future directions that integrate strong psychological science with empirical design.

 

This class has no prerequisites and is tailored towards an intelligent beginner, but we expect even advanced practitioners to find something useful and enjoyable in the material. We hope that the class can serve as a gathering place for those interested in cross-disciplinary work with a psychological basis.
MIT Heavy Metal 101 IAP 2022
Jan/10 Mon 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 06:30PM–08:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 06:30PM–08:00PM

Not a Metallurgy class! This veteran crash-course is coming back in full force and will have you head banging, air guitaring, and devil horn raising in no time! Learn everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal, including how Metallica tries too hard to be cool, why Lemmy IS God (RIP), how the genre tackles some of today's biggest sociopolitical challenges, why metal bands exist in every country on Earth, and why you're probably already a metalhead without even knowing it.  

WARNING: This series most definitely goes to 11!  Earplugs optional. We'll look at metal cultures, explore the fringes of the most extreme forms of metal, and, of course, listen to some SCREAMING HEAVY METAL! This is guaranteed to be the most BRUTAL class ever offered at MIT!

Follow the Zoom links to join any class, and all are welcome to join (even those outside the MIT community). Since we're still remote this year, seating isn't limited and all classes will be held on Zoom. All information can be found at metal.mit.edu

Full 2022 Schedule of Events (All events start at 6:30 PM ET, and links to the Zoom rooms that will be used are listed below. Keep in mind these times may shift depending on outside factors.)

Heavy Metal 101: Music and Culture
Monday January 10, 2022

An introduction to Heavy Metal. Topics include the musicology of Heavy Metal as well as an examination of Heavy Metal culture. This multimedia extravaganza covers everything you ever wanted to know about Heavy Metal!

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal, Part I
Tuesday, January 11, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the late 1960s through the early 1990s. Topics will include Hard Rock, Archetypal Heavy Metal, the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM), Power Metal, Thrash Metal, and the Big 4.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: The GUTS of Metal - Music Theory and Songwriting with Colin Brumley
Wednesday January 12, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Colin Brumley. Titled "The GUTS of Heavy Metal: Metal Music Theory," join us for an evening of metal music theory and songwriting with Colin Brumley of Dormivore and Noctobre. This presentation will be a deep dive into how metal is made and how it works, from the granular to the bird’s-eye view. Topics will include foundations in classical music theory (no prior knowledge needed), scales and modalities utilized in different types of metal, how to expand your listening, and — new this year! — apply these ingredients, augmented with other musicological factors, towards songwriting via analysis of full original songs. We wouldn’t show you how to make the world’s greatest grilled cheese without actually dissecting one! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Panel About Stage Lighting at Metal Concerts with Shannon Knotts and John Santos
Thursday January 13, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest panelists, John Santos and Shannon Knotts. What does it take to build the atmosphere of a live show with light and staging? This panel will feature two light and staging artists/engineers, John Santos and Shannon Knotts, who will discuss the process and challenges of creating successful shows and what sorts of thinking go into their production. Come with questions! 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Feminism and Motherhood with Joan Jocson-Singh
Tuesday January 18, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Joan Jocson-Singh. Joining us to discuss her research surrounding Feminism in Metal/Extreme Metal, Vigilante Feminism, and Motherhood's role within metal, Joan will also open a discussion around the larger questions about metal music in academia and the importance of "academicizing" the genre. 

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Heavy Metal Electronics 101 with Dr. Gore
Wednesday January 19, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Dr. Görebläster Körpse-härvest Lunden. In this session, MIT alum and physicist Dr. Gore will present an overview of the complete chain of electronic circuits that makes the heavy metal guitar sound the way it does. The class will cover pickups, effects pedals, amplifiers, and speakers, focusing especially on what happens to the electronic waveform each step of the way. There will also be live demonstrations to accompany the theoretical explanations. 

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part II
Thursday January 20, 2022

A seminar examining the history of Heavy Metal from the early 1990s to the present. Topics include New American Metal, Metalcore and Grindcore, Black Metal, Death Metal, and Extreme Metal.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Metal Makeup and Fashion with Wacky Jacky
Tuesday January 25, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Wacky Jacky. We've looked a lot at how metal formed and took shape over the years. Though, how can you better look the part, and what do the aesthetics say about the genre as a whole? Come by as Jacky explores various metal fashions and how they've evolved over time and across genres. P.S. Bring your battle vests, cuffs, and best corpse paint for this lecture.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Vocals with Paul Buckley
Wednesday January 26, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturer, Paul Buckley. This talk will discuss some background information regarding harsh vocals, how to develop and maintain a harsh vocal style, and examples of how harsh vocals are applied in metal.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part III
Thursday January 27, 2022

This will be a seminar examining the many of the remaining genres of Heavy Metal. Topics will include more obscure genres of Metal Fusion, Experimental and Avant-Garde Metal, and really whatever else we missed so far. It's going to get weird.

Zoom Link

MIT Heavy Metal 101: Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal with Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo
Tuesday, February 1, 2022

MIT Heavy Metal 101 is pleased to present guest lecturers, Nelson Varas-Díaz and Daniel Nevárez Araújo. Nelson and Daniel will discuss the topic of Extreme Decolonial Dialogues and Decolonial Heavy Metal. Throughout their research, they have revealed that metal as practiced, performed, and promoted in Latin America has a decolonial inflection whereby many bands in the region highlight their respective country’s colonial history and offer ways to challenge the conditions and ideologies inherited from said history. They will also discuss how their work in Latin American metal has inspired and informed a growing interest in the topic of metal in the Global South.

Zoom Link

History of Heavy Metal: Part IV
Thursday February 3, 2022

An extra class? We'll have a couple extra surprises before we close this year out!

Zoom Link

Make your research computationally reproducible
Jan/27 Thu 01:00PM–04:00PM

Open and reproducible research has become essential for scientific research. What do we mean by reproducible or replicable research? Why do you need to enhance the reproducibility of your work? What are some ways that you can make your own research computationally reproducible and shareable? This workshop will introduce a reproducible research pipeline that connects data collection, analysis, visualization, and presentation, using tools and platforms including R, Python, Docker, Binder, GitHub, Open Science Framework, and Zenodo.  Attendees will gain familiarity with principles, strategies and tools to document, manage and share your work to facilitate reproducible research. This workshop is appropriate for any researchers who are interested in applying these tools and strategies to their research

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/repro-20210127

Manage Your PDFs and Citations: Zotero & Mendeley
Jan/25 Tue 11:00AM–12:00PM

Using citation management software to create and maintain a collection of references or PDFs is common and important in today’s academic world. These tools will help you to save citations from your favorite databases and websites, store related PDFs or attachments, and quickly build a bibliography for your papers and publications. We’ll review Zotero and Mendeley and show how to use them together to help your manage your PDF’s and citations.

A Zoom invitation will be emailed to registered participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8742112

Managing Your Research Code
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–02:00PM

Do you write software in the course of your research? Have you been required by funders or publishers to share your code, or do you want to make it accessible to others to use? Documenting, sharing, and archiving your research software can make your research more transparent and reproducible, and can help you get credit for your work. This workshop will go over reasons to share your software, and will cover some best practices and considerations that will help you document your software and make it citable. We'll also go over options for archiving and publishing research software, including software papers and managing software with associated data sets, and some best practices for citing and documenting all of the software that you use.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/software_iap2022

Mathematics of Big Data & Machine Learning
Jan/04 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM
Jan/10 Mon 05:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM
Jan/14 Fri 05:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM
Jan/24 Mon 05:00PM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM–11:55AM

Enrollment: Limited: Advance sign-up required Limited to 35 participants

Attendance: Participants must attend all sessions

Prereq: Matrix Mathematics

Big Data describes a new era in the digital age where the volume, velocity, and variety of data created across a wide range of fields is increasing at a rate well beyond our ability to analyze the data.  Machine Learning has emerged as a powerful tool for transforming this data into usable information.  Many technologies (e.g., spreadsheets, databases, graphs, matrices, deep neural networks, ...) have been developed to address these challenges.  The common theme amongst these technologies is the need to store and operate on data as tabular collections instead of as individual data elements.  This class describes the common mathematical foundation of these tabular collections (associative arrays) that apply across a wide range of applications and technologies.  Associative arrays unify and simplify Big Data and Machine Learning.  Understanding these mathematical foundations allows the student to see past the differences that lie on the surface of Big Data and Machine Learning applications and technologies and leverage their core mathematical similarities to solve the hardest Big Data and Machine Learning challenges.

This interactive course will involve significant interactive student participation and a small amount of homework.   Those students who fully participate and complete the homework will receive a certificate of completion.

The MIT Press book "Mathematics of Big Data" that will be used throughout the course will be provided.

E-mail the instructor to sign up.

 

Instructors:

Jeremy Kepner - Fellow & Head MIT Supercomputing Center - kepner@ll.mit.edu

Hayden Jananthan - Post Doc MIT Supercomputing Center - hayden.jananthan@ll.mit.edu

Signup Deadline: Dec 15

Dates:

Jan 04 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Course Intro and Chapter 1

Jan 10 Mon 05:00PM-06:00PM Virtual Chapters 2 & 4 Team Prep

Jan 11 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Chapters 2 & 4

Jan 14 Fri 05:00PM-06:00PM Virtual Chapters 5 & 6 Team Prep

Jan 18 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Chapters 5 & 6

Jan 24 Mon 05:00PM-06:00PM Virtual Chapters 7 & 8 Team Prep

Jan 25 Tue 10:00AM-11:55AM Virtual Chapters 7 & 8

Medical Interpreting Course
Jan/03 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/04 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/05 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/07 Fri 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/10 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/17 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 12:00AM–09:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 12:00AM–09:00PM

ActLingual and the Prehealth Advising Office are teaming up to offer a medical interpreting training this IAP through the University of Massachusetts Medical School! There are some very important details below so please read carefully if you are still interested in signing up:

  • Weekly classes are planned to be from Monday to Thursday starting on January 3rd- January 26 (with MLK day off). The classes will be completely virtual and at night from 6pm to 9pm. Two nights a week are dedicated to anatomy and physiology and two nights a week are dedicated to interpreter skills.
  • All languages are welcome for this course, as there will be no specific language coaching, so you should already have a good grasp on your target language.
  • Certificates will be given to students to show completion of 40 hours of interpreting training.
  • Students will need to pay $200 and non-students will pay $400 for this course. Please bring a check made out to CAPD to E-17-294

Please fill out this form if you are interested!

Momentum 2022 Competition Day
Jan/27 Thu 02:30PM–05:00PM

The Office of Minority Education (OME) invites all Institute members to our annual Momentum Competition Day on Thursday, January 27, 2022 from 2:30-5:00 p.m.

Each year, the OME collaborates with one industry partner to introduce a collaborative design course, 16.682 (Momentum). This year, we partnered with Lockheed Martin this year for a fully-virtual IAP and had students solve one of two challenges: This group was tasked to use drone flight simulation software and generate mission plans which task a virtual aircraft to either retrieve water and suppress wildfires, or go on a virtual search-and-rescue mission and identify lost people on a map. The competition day is a culmination of four weeks of work among our first-and-second year participants, and our 9 groups will be presenting their IAP final projects. 

 

To join our meeting, click the Join Stream button appearing on the right-hand side or enter https://mit.zoom.us/j/97544762011?pwd=UjQvTnZiZXRLbEFpd21TbHZTQ2VnQT09 in your search bar. The passcode for this meeting is 517059.

Mycotecture, BioHab, MycoHab and Regenerative Food, Medicine, Materials: A surprisingly digital (r)evolution in agriculture and construction
Jan/28 Fri 12:15PM–03:00PM

Online only with interactive live video of mycotecture techniques.

Dr. Andreas Mershin, director of the MIT Label Free Research Group, hosts key doers in the mycotecture regenerative agriculture and construction materials industries in a series of short presentations and panel Q&A followed by hands-on, live and interactive demonstration of mycotecture techniques by Chris Maurer, via video link to redhouse studios in Cleveland, OH.

Using the exemplar of the BioHab, a joint MIT-SBG-redhouse project currently being deployed in Namibia, architect and founder of redhouse studio Chris Maurer will explain working mycelium methods to reform agriwaste leveraging inflatables to create superior new “bioterials”, self-reproducing buildings, edible and medicinal mushrooms all in one process. Carolyn Cameron-Kirksmith, head of Group Strategic Development of Standard Bank Group and BioHAB will cover Africa’s largest bank continued investment in mco-R&D as well as entrepreneurial deployment directly to market after establishing growing mushrooms operations at BioHab Namibia. We will cover blockchain technologies aiming at accurately tracking product quality and provenance and discuss monetizing carbon sequestration and land stewardship. 

Zoom linkhttps://mit.zoom.us/j/6736844148

Links to additional materials:
www.bio-hab.org
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L0EgAVwZbM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG5fe7AfaPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9ovt4QaprE&t=422s

NIH Data Management and Sharing Plans: What, Why, and What's Next
Jan/19 Wed 02:00PM–03:00PM

So, you want to write an NIH grant and need to know more about their new policy on Data Management & Sharing Plans (NOT-OD-21-013, effective 25Jan2023)? This session will highlight its key elements and changes, give an overview of the background and rationale of the new policy, and help you lay out a path for successfully meeting its expectations at MIT. This workshop will be over Zoom and the link will be emailed to participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8612296

Pleasures of Poetry 2022
Jan/03 Mon 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/04 Tue 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/05 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/07 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 01:00PM–02:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 01:00PM–02:00PM

Pleasures of Poetry meets this IAP 2022 in 14E-304 from 1:00 - 2:00pm every weekday through the first three weeks of IAP (Jan. 3-21), with the exception of MLK Jr. Day (Jan. 17). This popular activity – which aims to reach all those with an interest in poetry, regardless of experience level – has been offered every IAP for more than 25 years. Each one-hour session is devoted to a poet or two, often a single poem, chosen by session leaders who volunteer to facilitate conversation for that day. Discussion and collaborative close reading are the aim and ideal of each hour. Some participants attend every session, but many others may drop in only once or twice during the series to discuss a favorite poet or poem. The roster of poets is typically diverse: from ancient Chinese masters to American poets laureate, and from canonical authors such as Shakespeare, Keats, Auden, and Bishop to contemporary poets including Eve L. Ewing, Alice Notley, and many more.

Free and open to the public; as well as staff, alumni, and students. 

  • **Visitors must attest in Tim Tickets to having the booster by Jan 14th.**
  • Everyone must be masked and have COVID pass or a Tim Ticket to attend PoP 2022: http://covidapps.mit.edu/visitors
  • IF YOU ARE NOT ON COVID PASS: You must email tranvoj@mit.edu prior to coming to MIT. You will need a Tim Ticket invitation & attestation to gain access to building 14. 
  • No food or drink is allowed. Only the moderator may have a water bottle.
  • All attendees must be masked at all times, including the moderator and respondents. There will be no exceptions to this requirement.
  • Attendees are NOT allowed to come early or stay late; we, unfortunately, cannot allow that sort of socializing this year due to MIT’s COVID policies. **Please email with any further questions.

Location: Building 14, Room 14E-304
Pleasures of Poetry 2022 Poetry Booklet.pdf

*Updated Schedule: 1/14

Jan 3 Wyn Kelley - Emily Dickinson “Bloom - is Result - to meet a Flower” & "As if some little Arctic flower"; Herman Melville "Field Asters" & "Inscription"
Jan 4 Diana Henderson - William  Shakespeare "Song: Fear no more the heat o’ the sun”; Ben Jonson "On My First Son" & "On My First Daughter"; John Donne "A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy’s Day"
Jan 5 Pamela Sutton - Wilfred Owen "Spring Offensive"; Edwin Muir  "The Horses"
Jan 6 Zachary Bos - Bertolt Brecht "Fragen eines lesenden Arbeiters"; and "A Worker Reads History"/"Questions From a Worker Who Reads"
Jan 7 Inclement Weather - MIT Closed
Jan 10 Mary Fuller - Sandra Lim “Amor Fati” & “The Vanishing World”; Martha Collins “The Good Gray Wolf” & “The Story We Know”
Jan 11 Mark Hessler - Herman Hesse "Ode to Hölderlin" & "In a Collection of Egyptian Sculptures" & "The Poet" (German & English)
Jan 12 Avery Nguyen - Linda Hogan "If Home is the Body" & "The Fingers, Writing"
Jan 13 Lianne Habinek - Selection of poems by Margaret Cavendish
Jan 14* Elizabeth Doran - Forrest Gander "Aubade"; "In the Mountains"; "Pastoral" (pg 28-29); & "Pastoral"  (pg 46-47)
Jan 17 - There will be no POP session on Martin Luther King Jr. Day - Institute Holiday.
Jan 18 Anne Hudson - Joy Harjo "Bird" & "Ah, Ah" 
Jan 19 Brindha Rathinasabapathi - Anne Sexton "Her Kind”;  Audre Lorde “A Woman Speaks”;  Margaret Atwood "Siren Song";  Alice Walker "Be Nobody’s Darling"
Jan 20 Nick Montfort - Lillian-Yvonne Bertram "@Tubman’s_Rock"
Jan 21 David Thorburn - Robert Pinsky "At Mt. Auburn Cemetery" & "Shirt"

Practical High Performance Computing: Scaling Beyond your Laptop
Jan/11 Tue 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 09:00AM–12:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:00AM–12:00PM

The focus of this workshop is to introduce the role of High Performance Computing in research. Learn how to scale your application to run on HPC Systems available to the MIT Community.

Description
The focus of this workshop is to introduce the role of High Performance Computing (HPC, aka supercomputing) in research. We will discuss the fields where HPC is used and provide concrete examples where we describe the strategies used to scale applications to hundreds of processors. Students will learn when to scale from their laptops to HPC, what challenges that introduces, and how to address those challenges with efficient HPC workflows. The MIT SuperCloud will be used for hands-on examples using C/C++, Julia, Matlab, and/or Python. We will also demonstrate applications using other computing resources on campus, such as the Satori and Engaging clusters. Students should bring an existing research problem/application that they would like to scale as a project.

This is a blended course with asynchronous and live components. Much of the lecture will be available before class in pre-recorded short videos and class time will be spent on hands-on activities and student research project work. Students taking the class for MIT credit are required to complete a short report on their project.

Students looking to take this class for credit should sign up for 12.091/12.S593. Those interested in taking the class not for credit can send email to lauren.milechin@mit.edu.

Prerequisites
Working knowledge of one programming/scripting language. Laptop for hands-on exercises. Participants will get further instruction on how to access MIT Supercloud once registered for the class. Students should bring an existing research problem/application that they would like to scale as a project.

Quick and Dirty Data Management: the 5 things you need to be doing now
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–11:00AM

Do you have data? (Who doesn't?!) Learn about the five basic things you can do now to manage your data for future happiness. These tools and techniques support practical data management and you can start using them immediately. Work with your personal data or research data, but start working now to ensure a future you who is secure in the existence, understandability, and reusability of your data!

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/event/8612232

R for the true beginner
Jan/25 Tue 02:00PM–03:30PM

Heard of R but not sure what it does? Want to dive into it but not sure how to get started? In this session, we will go through the basics of R from what it is, when to use it, and how to perform simple tasks in the user-friendly RStudio interface. The workshop is geared towards people new to R with little to no programming experience. Attendees will be expected to download and install R and RStudio on their computers. Instructions will be provided to registrants ahead of the session.

Regsiter: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/Rbeginner_jan2022

Reconstructing Religion: Can Religious Faith Contribute to the Public Good? Should it have a Place in the Public Square?
Jan/25 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

How did the church get to the point where Christianity as a tradition and Christians, in particular, are often looked at with derision and as an anchor around the neck of society rather than a cool breeze blowing into its sails? Is there a way to imagine religion (specifically Christianity) that promotes human flourishing and strengthens our Democratic Tradition? Is there a place for the faith in the public square and what contributions can it make, if any? Or is it no longer needed?

Dr. Ron Sanders - Affiliate Assistant Professor in Ethics. He holds a Ph.D. in Theology and Christian Ethics from Fuller Theological Seminary, an M.A. in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics from Biola University.

Recruiting + Interviewing UROPs Workshop
Jan/05 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

Learn about how to advertise UROP opportunities and other ways to recruit UROP students. We will also cover tips to interviewing potential UROP students with key questions/topics to cover in interviews. There will be time for Q+A at the end. No advance sign-up.

Restorative Justice: ICEO Community Dialogues
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM
Transforming Communities, Classrooms and Conflict
 
Restorative justice challenges us to hold ourselves and our communities accountable to cultivating and maintaining the relationships and systems that deeply center our humanity and align with our core values. How can restorative practices be used to not only address interpersonal harm but transform the ways in which we live, work and learn together in service of a more just and equitable society?
 
In this interactive presentation and discussion, participants will be introduced to the indigenous origins and core tenants of restorative justice; its contemporary practices and applications on college campuses, and how it can help us realize our vision for equity, inclusion and belonging. 
 
The session will be led by Nina Harris, Restorative Resolutions Coordinator (Institute Discrimination Harassment & Response).
 
Science and Faith - friends of foes? (Part 2) - Can a Scientist Believe in the Miracles of Jesus?
Jan/13 Thu 07:30PM–09:00PM

How do we reconcile miracles with our modern, scientific understanding of nature? Is it reasonable for any thinking person to accept them as true? Do the miraculous claims of Christianity, like the miracles of Jesus, hold up under scrutiny, and what do they mean for us?

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Science and Faith - friends or foes? (Part 1) - Is there Evidence for God in the Universe? Do the Laws of Nature Point to God or lead us away from the idea of a God?
Jan/11 Tue 07:30PM–09:00PM

Many people have difficulty reconciling modern science with the Christian faith(as well as other faith traditions) - especially the Biblical account of cosmology and the origins of the universe. The fundamental laws of nature in our universe appear to be "fine-tuned" to allow for intelligent life. In this talk, we'll dive into modern scientific discovery and explore possible explanations for this phenomenon and speculate on the possible role of a designer.

DR. TOM RUDELIUS - Postdoctoral researcher in theoretical physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a bachelor's degree in physics, mathematics, and statistical science from Cornell University.

Seminar: Innovation and Social Justice
Jan/12 Wed 11:00AM–12:30PM
Jan/19 Wed 11:00AM–12:30PM
Jan/26 Wed 11:00AM–12:30PM

Whether you are seeking inspiration or already committed to making the world better and just, this series will give you indispensable insights and the tools you need. It draws from the speaker’s experience at the frontline, and from philosophy, history and sociology to address the nature of justice, injustice and paths to justice.

Manish Bhardwaj is a Fellow of the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values. He is the James Wei Visiting Professor at the Keller Center at Princeton where he teaches idealism, and entrepreneurship in the service of justice. He is the co-founder of Innovators In Health (IIH) which delivers healthcare to the rural poor in India. IIH works through accompaniment, addressing the particular barriers of a particular person in a particular place. Over the past 11 years, IIH has served more than 100,000 patients. Partnering with more than 800 female community healthcare workers, the organization has doubled access to TB treatment, and cut neonatal mortality by more than a third. Manish has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Software Radio
Jan/10 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 01:00PM–04:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 01:00PM–04:00PM

Learn about software defined radio using GNU Radio during this interactive course.

Software-defined radio (SDR) technology is having a tremendous impact not only in consumer devices but also in the areas of rapid prototyping and research and development. MIT Lincoln Laboratory is offering a course to introduce students to SDR fundamentals and applications. Students will gain hands-on experience with the USRP SDR platform and GNU Radio toolkit, while learning theory and practice of digital signal processing and digital communications. The course will consist of several projects, such as FM radio receivers, digital video transmission and reception, and spectrum sensing, highlighting the flexibility of software radios.

Gain hands-on experience with popular software radio platforms (USRP, HackRF, RTL-SDR,…)
• Learn theory and practice of digital signal processing and digital communications
• Projects include
– FM radio receiver
– Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) receiver
– Spectrum sensing / signal detection
– GPS receiver
– Digital modulation

Spice Up Your Writing: Add Music, Personality, and Voice
Jan/21 Fri 10:00AM–11:30AM

Academic writing does not have to be boring and insipid. During this hands-on virtual workshop, you will play with sentences, explore rhetorical devices, and have fun with punctuation. Pamela Siska, a WCC communication specialist, instructor, and published scholar, will equip you with tools to make your writing spicy and exciting, and you will leave with a mission to start exploring your personal voice.

Starr Forum: The Russian-Ukrainian Conflict: A prologue to WWIII or another frozen conflict?
Jan/28 Fri 10:30AM–11:30AM

Please register for this Zoom event at https://bit.ly/Russian-UkrainianConflict

Featuring:

Dmitry Gorenburg is a senior research scientist at CNA, where he has worked since 2000. Dr. Gorenburg is an associate at the Harvard University Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His research interests include security issues in the former Soviet Union, Russian military reform, Russian foreign policy, and ethnic politics and identity.

Olga Oliker is the program director for Europe and Central Asia at the International Crisis Group. Her research interests include foreign and security policies of Russia, Ukraine, and the Central Asian and Caucasian successor states to the Soviet Union, domestic politics in these countries, US policy towards the region, and nuclear weapon strategy and arms control. She received her PhD from the MIT Department of Political Science.

Serhii Plokhii is the Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History and director of the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University.  His research interests include the intellectual, cultural, and international history of Eastern Europe, with an emphasis on Ukraine.

Carol Saivetz is a senior advisor in the MIT Security Studies Program. She is a research associate at Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Dr Saivetz is the author and contributing co-editor of books and articles on Soviet and now Russian foreign policy issues, including an assessment of the “reset,” Russian policies toward the other Soviet successor states, and current US-Russian relations.

Elizabeth Wood is professor of history at MIT. She is the author most recently of Roots of Russia’s War in Ukraine (Woodrow Wilson Center and Columbia University Press, 2016). She is co-director of the MIT Russia Program, coordinator of Russian studies, and adviser to the Russian Language Program. 

 

A session of the Focus on Russia Lecture Series.

Co-sponsors:  MIT Center for International Studies (CIS), MIT Security Studies Program (SSP), MISTI MIT-Russia

 

Event Poster

View Poster | Watch Video | View Transcript

Free & open to the public 
Also watch it on YouTube.

MIT is committed to providing an environment that is accessible to individuals with disabilities. If you need a disability related accommodation to attend or have other questions, please contact us at starrforum@mit.edu.

Sign up for Starr Forum emails to get notified about upcoming events.

A full listing of Starr Forums is available here

Stretch Your Impact - faculty talk with Ben Armstrong
Jan/19 Wed 12:00PM–01:00PM

Join the MIT PKG Center in conversation with Ben Armstrong, Interim Executive Director and a Research Scientist at MIT’s Industrial Performance Center. His research and teaching examine how workers, firms, and regions adapt to technological change. His current projects include a national plan for the U.S. manufacturing workforce in partnership with the Department of Defense, as well as a policy playbook developing lessons for struggling regional economies in the United States.

In his work, Ben has collaborated with governments, non-profit organizations, and firms to understand how scholarship and education can be useful to practitioners and policymakers. Ben completed his undergraduate degree at Northwestern University and his PhD at MIT. Before graduate school, he helped lead an open-source hardware non-profit and worked at Google Inc.

Want to learn more about Ben’s work? Check out this Forbes article featuring his work. 

On Zoom - RSVP to get Zoom link 

Wednesday, January 19th, at 12 PM

​ 

Stretch Your Impact - social impact tech in education
Jan/13 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Looking to learn more about education, technology, and entrepreneurship?

Do you love music? 

Join the PKG Center and Rhymes with Reason to learn more about using education entrepreneurship to innovate.

We will be joined by Founder & CEO of Rhymes with Reason, Austin Martin. Rhymes with Reason is a "web-based educational platform that uses popular music to help students learn standardized, literacy-related topics, including vocabulary." Austin founded the organization while an undergraduate at Brown University as a means of making education more equitable and culturally inclusive of minority youth. Want to learn more? Watch Austin’s TED Talk learn more about his social innovation in education.  

On Zoom - RSVP to get link 

Thursday, January 13th, at noon ET

Styling Your Academic Writing (4-session series)
Jan/13 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/18 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/20 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM–11:30AM

This four-session series will equip you with the tools to take your academic writing style to the next level. You will learn how to clarify your meaning in complex sentences (Part 1), how to cut down your word count so that every word matters (Part 2), how to enhance the flow and coherence of your sentences and paragraphs (Part 3), and how to add "good words" to increase clarity and thick description (Part 4). This interactive workshop series will offer diverse and creative methods for styling writing. We will engage with examples from academic, technical, and creative writing to get us thinking about the context of "good style.”

This series is tailored to suit the needs of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars across disciplines as well as researchers and other scholars. We encourage you to attend all sessions of the series, but you are also welcome to sign up for separate sessions.

Summer Internships with Coding it Forward - info session
Jan/06 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

Looking for a meaningful tech internship for next summer?

Want to innovate at the intersection of tech and public service?

Join the PKG Center and Coding it Forward to learn about paid tech internships in government in the US. 

 

On Zoom - RSVP to get the Zoom link

Thursday, January 6th, noon ET

 

In 2017, a group of Boston-area technology students found themselves frustrated by the lack of mission-driven technical internships - so they decided to do something about it! Today, Coding it Forward offers paid internships for innovative technology students to work with federal, state, and local government offices. Applications for the summer programs open in January.

 

  • As a Civic Digital Fellow, you can spend the summer deepening your understanding of the technology behind federal government services and applying your skills to develop solutions that will serve everyday Americans.
  • Or, apply to the Civic Innovation Corps for the opportunity to collaborate with a host office at the state or local level to make government more effective and efficient for all.

 

Hear from MIT students who’ve participated recently and bring your questions for Coding it Forward’s Deputy Director, Ariana Soto.

Sustainability and Climate Change
Jan/25 Tue 10:00AM–04:00PM

Operations Research Center IAP Seminar 2022Operations Research is a powerful area for applications involving energy process design, waste minimization, climate change mitigation, scarce resources management, and other problems related to creating more sustainable and environmentally responsible operations. In this seminar, we will engage with a wide range of researchers and practitioners tackling these and other topics via data science, optimization, and other contemporary OR methods.

The Future is Flexible: MLK Scholar Kristen Dorsey
Jan/27 Thu 12:00PM–01:00PM

MLK Visiting Scholar Kristen Dorsey talks about developments in soft mechanical sensors, 3D printed textiles, and more; the need for culture change in academic to support a more diverse generation of engineers.

Tips + Strategies to Find a UROP
Jan/13 Thu 03:30PM–04:30PM

Join us to learn key ways to find research opportunities in your area(s) of interest. Includes overview on UROP postings, how to identify faculty/labs that align with your research interests, best practices when emailing supervisors, as well as resume and interviewing tips. There will be time to ask questions and receive suggestions based on your personal research interests! 

Tips, Tricks, and Tools for Productive Writing: Building a Supportive Community for Feedback and Motivation
Jan/26 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM

This workshop will provide an introduction to the concept of peer review writing groups: small groups self-organized specifically as a space for workshopping drafts, staying on track with writing projects, and practicing scholarly communication with colleagues. In this workshop, you will learn about the advantages of peer review writing groups and the best practices for establishing your own group. We’ll cover different possible models and the “predictable pitfalls” that can occur in sustaining a group and running meetings. We will also introduce tools and resources you can apply to support structured and constructive ways of giving and receiving feedback on writing.

Tips, Tricks, and Tools for Productive Writing: Constructive Procrastination as a Part of a Healthy Writing Process
Jan/19 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM

Society tells us that procrastination is bad, when in fact it can be a useful part of the writing process. In this workshop, Susan Spilecki,  a WCC Instructor, communication specialist, and poet, will help you brainstorm all the specifics of your individual writing process, from the beginning of a project to the end,  and discuss the usefulness of different strategies for different people. By reflecting on the way individuals actually learn, synthesize ideas, write, and revise, we can make our own processes more effective. Getting to know what you need for your particular process puts you in control of it, rather than letting it control you. In addition to gaining a better understanding of your existing writing process – and how you actually procrastinate constructively – participants will leave with resources and tools to better manage your process.

Tips, Tricks, and Tools for Productive Writing: Managing Your Time and Expectations
Jan/12 Wed 10:00AM–11:30AM

Writing a dissertation can seem distinct from earlier work, with fewer deadlines, less structure, and less contact with others. At the same time, tackling this bigger project can be seen as a continuation of previous work, but one with more options for choice. During this workshop, Betsy Fox, a WCC Instructor and Communication Specialist, will offer suggestions on managing time, being productive, and making the long-distance journey of a dissertation more comfortable and companionable.

Tools and tips for thesis authors
Jan/06 Thu 01:00PM–02:30PM

So it's time to write your thesis. What do you need to know about the process? What tools and experts are out there to help? This session will cover the required specifications for submitting your thesis, writing with the Overleaf LaTeX thesis template, ways to approach your literature review section, tools for organizing your literature, and options for managing and sharing related data and code. We'll review some common copyright questions related to theses, including whether you need permission to use certain figures in your thesis, and what is involved when you want to publish parts of your thesis before or after the thesis is submitted.

This session is appropriate for anyone who is planning to write a thesis or is currently writing a thesis at MIT. 

Registration is limited to current MIT affiliates.

Register here: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/thesis_iap2022

UROP IAP Expo (virtual)
Jan/19 Wed 04:00PM–05:00PM

Undergraduates - Join us (virtually) to learn about UROP opportunities at MIT!  We will have faculty, postdocs, graduate students and administrators from academic departments and research labs/centers available to speak with you about research projects in their areas.  This is a great way to start learning about and looking for a Spring or Summer 2022 UROP! Sign-up here!

UROP Project Planning Workshop for Supervisors
Jan/11 Tue 04:00PM–05:00PM

Join us as we review key characteristics of a successful UROP experience, and tips and strategies to develop a UROP project that best helps the UROP student, the lab, and you! No advance sign-up.

WCC Consultations are open during IAP 2022. Don’t wait -- schedule today!
Jan/03 Mon 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/04 Tue 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/05 Wed 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/06 Thu 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/07 Fri 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/10 Mon 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/11 Tue 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/12 Wed 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/13 Thu 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/14 Fri 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/18 Tue 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/19 Wed 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/20 Thu 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/21 Fri 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/24 Mon 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/25 Tue 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/26 Wed 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/27 Thu 09:00AM–06:00PM
Jan/28 Fri 09:00AM–06:00PM

The Writing and Communication Center offers free one-on-one professional advice from communication experts with advanced degrees and publishing experience. The WCC can help you learn about all types of academic and professional writing and further develop your oral communication skills. You can learn more about WCC consultations at the WCC website and register with the online scheduler to make a remote appointment through https://mit.mywconline.com. Please note that the WCC hours are offered Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., and fill up fast.

Writing Your Thesis Proposal in the Humanities and Social Sciences
Jan/27 Thu 10:00AM–11:30AM

Before you write a thesis or dissertation, you are usually required to get the approval of a “proposal” or “prospectus.” In this workshop, Bob Irwin, a WCC Lecturer and Communication Specialist, and Elena Kallestinova, WCC Director, will address what makes a prospectus successful. Join us to learn how that smaller task can help you with the larger one.

Writing better READMEs: mini workshop
Jan/12 Wed 11:00AM–11:30AM

README files are standard for software, but they provide useful basic documentation for datasets as well. Get up to speed on efficiently writing useful README files for datasets and software in this short class. We'll cover some common things you should include in these files, as well as how to provide a citation to ensure you get credit for your hard work, and will share links to resources. Save yourself time and trouble -- if you are sharing data or software, you need READMEs! This workshop will be over Zoom and the link will be emailed to participants.

Register: https://libcal.mit.edu/calendar/events/readmes_iap2022

iGEM Infosession
Jan/11 Tue 07:00PM

A ~1 hour info session about iGEM and how MIT students can get involved for the 2022 season. Learn more at https://biomakers.mit.edu/igem/ or email ellief@mit.edu and angao@mit.edu